Grenada Named “Destination of the Year” by Caribbean Journal

The sun rises over Grenada’s capital city of St. George’s.

Caribbean Journal has named Grenada as its 2017 Caribbean Destination of the Year, calling the Spice Isle “one of the region’s hottest places to visit.”

The Journal credited Grenada’s booming hotel development and a certain “x-factor” for earning its top billing in 2017. Visit caribbeanjournal.com to read more about the distinction and other travel award selections.

It is only the latest recognition for the island. In 2012, the Spice Isle took home two of Scuba Diving Magazine Reader’s Choice awards, finishing first in the Caribbean/Atlantic region in the “Advanced Diving” and “Wreck Diving” categories. A year later, National Geographic Traveler listed Grenada as one of its 20 “must-see places” to visit, calling its capital, St. George’s, “one of the prettiest towns in the Caribbean.”

Since 2008, Grenada has warmly welcomed thousands of visitors for St. George’s University bi-annual Family Weekend festivities, during which students’ families and friends get an insider’s look into life as an SGU student, learning about all that the campus and island have to offer.

Mini-Med School Plants Seeds for Grenada’s Future Physicians

Medical students can often point to the moment when their interest in medicine was sparked. By hosting a mini-medical school on general wellness and sickle cell disease for students from Westmorland Secondary School, the St. George’s University Chapter of the Student National Medical Association hoped to plant that seed in their minds and hearts as well.

During the visit, WSS students explored the field of medicine with interactive healthcare lessons, including learning how to take a pulse, identifying signs of anemia, and listening to a heartbeat.

“Children love this kind of hands-on approach to learning,” said Mrs. Meredith Swan-Sampson, Head of the Science Department at Westmorland Secondary School. “The mini-med school generated more interest in the medical field within the students by providing insight into the profession. Our students learned more about what it’s like becoming a doctor and all that it entails from a student perspective.”

In addition to a presentation on sickle cell disease by the members of SGU’s Internal Medicine Club, the students also learned about the components of the blood, conducted physical examinations, and received a lesson on how to perform CPR. At the end of the day, the visiting students took part in a mini-graduation ceremony, receiving certificates of participation and the added treat of being allowed to take photos in the white coats of the SNMA members.

“While in Grenada, we wanted to find more ways to interact with the youth and help encourage them to become doctors as well,” said Danae Brierre, SNMA President. “The purpose of SNMA-SGU Chapter is not only to promote medicine in the underserved communities but also to help influence the students of our host country through our outreach and education programs like the mini-med school. We’re here in Grenada becoming doctors and we want to show them that as Grenadians they too can become doctors here at SGU.”

With the mission of diversifying the face of medicine, SNMA chapters based at allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in the US are designed to serve the health needs of underserved communities and communities of color. Additionally, SNMA is dedicated both to ensuring that medical education and services are culturally sensitive to the needs of diverse populations and to increasing the number of African-American, Latino, and other students of color entering and completing medical school.

SAS Lecture Series Discusses Effects of Parental Migration

Meschida Philip introduces her documentary at Patrick Adams Hall.

Meschida Philip, Grenadian filmmaker and founder of Meaningful Projekts Creative Group, recently showcased her documentary, “Scars of Our Mothers’ Dreams”, as part of St. George’s University School of Arts and Sciences Open Lecture Series. The film, which offers a unique and intimate glimpse into the complexities of parental migration through the lenses of children left behind, was followed by a spirited panel discussion with the mix of faculty, staff, students, and the general public in attendance at Patrick Adams Hall.

The lecture was a collaborative effort between SGU’s Department of Humanities and Social Sciences and the University of the West Indies Open Campus.

“I wanted to start a conversation by looking at how children are emotionally affected when a parent is gone,” said Ms. Philip. “In most cases, we tend to focus on the financial gain—that parents were leaving to make better lives for their children. But what about the importance of nurturing the emotional connection between a mother and her child?”

Years after her own personal struggle to overcome the feeling of childhood abandonment, Ms. Philip returned to Grenada to share the stories of others with similar childhood experiences, describing how their lives were impacted after their parents migrated.

“I wanted to examine not just the economic benefits of a parent migrating but how we the children were affected emotionally and psychologically,” stated Ms. Philip. “Also, I wanted to find out if there were any common themes between myself and other people that affected us from childhood into adulthood.”

“Migration is a hot button issue right now that has both local and international appeal,” said Dr. Damian Greaves, Associate Professor, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. “In the past, the focus would usually be on the great economic benefit to the Caribbean in terms of remittances from the diaspora. However, I thought it was very important to highlight Ms. Philip’s unique perspective when addressing an issue that is so little talked about but has such a large effect on so many in our Grenadian community.

“The purpose of this lecture was not only to start the conversation but also to bring an awareness to bear on the Grenadian public, that there are people who have been scarred psychologically and emotionally by the migration of their parents, who through no conscious and deliberate fault of their own, thought that they were building a better life for their children but were unaware of what transpired in their absence,” added Dr. Greaves. “Our hope is that when looking at the issue of migration we can be mindful of the social policies that are needed in order to affect change at the state level.”

The Therapeutic Value of Hypnosis

Throughout the history of hypnotherapy, stage hypnotists have awed and delighted onlookers with their ability to control their subjects’ minds. There have been consequences however; many believe that stage hypnosis, often seen as humiliating its subjects, has undermined the credibility and therefore the therapeutic benefits of clinical hypnosis.

Dr. Zoita Mandila, Hon. Secretary at the British Society of Clinical and Academic Hypnosis (BSCAH), recently presented a CME lecture titled “Clinical Hypnosis – Changing from the Ordinary to Extraordinary” at St. George’s University. A dental clinician for more than 17 years, Dr. Mandila and her colleagues at the BSCAH described clinical hypnosis as the safe and responsible use of hypnosis in medicine, dentistry, and psychology for its therapeutic value when treating an array of psychological, emotional, and physical problems.

“I have been using clinical hypnosis for the past six years and I have to say it has changed the way I practice,” praised Dr. Mandila. “My goal here is to allow clinicians to see that hypnosis is really a tool for them. It could change the framework that they use in the clinical setting. This tool can help them to improve their relationship with patients, and how they perform their clinical treatment—allowing the patient to be much more relaxed and achieve a faster and easier recovery.”

According to Dr. Mandila, it is important to understand the difference between stage hypnosis, performed for entertainment in a club or at a party, and clinical hypnosis, induced in a private office setting for therapeutic benefit. The clinical hypnotherapist relies on his or her knowledge of the human psyche, a caring and compassionate manner, an understanding of the phenomena surrounding hypnosis, and clients who are prepared to accept help with the change they seek.

Additionally, she explains that hypnosis can’t make you do anything unwillingly. Hypnotherapists can’t change a patient’s beliefs and behaviors with a snap of their fingers. Dr. Mandila maintains that the patient is in full control at all times.

“The stage hypnotist uses hypnosis for entertainment. We do it to help people. We do it to make them better, which is a much more humanitarian scope for it,” she stated. “The techniques are a little similar, but we provide the best care for our patients.”

AMSA Conference in Grenada Dives Into Medicine That Matters in 2017

SGU AMSA’s President, Judy Wong (far left), and SGU AMSA Executive Board Members greet conference guests.

The St. George’s University-led chapter of the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) brought together a combination of expert facilitators and physicians-in-training during its 2017 AMSA International Conference in Grenada. Assembled for only the second time outside of the United States, the two-day conference, held October 21 and 22, focused on “Preparing for Medicine that Matters,” providing attendees with an opportunity to explore current issues in medicine, build clinical skills, and connect with peers and other healthcare professionals.

“The conference provided a networking opportunity and a chance to educate our students outside of a classroom setting,” said Judy Wong, SGU AMSA President. “In particular, the Practicing Physicians Panel allowed students to have their questions answered about various specialties and the road to pursuing them.”

In addition to more than 15 dynamic clinical skills sessions, students experienced an interactive exhibit fair that showcased medical technology that will shape their future practice. The conference also featured a keynote address by Dr. Marios Loukas, Dean of Basic Sciences at St. George’s University, and Professor of Anatomy in the School of Medicine. Other guest speakers included: Rebekah Apple, Director of Student Affairs and Programming, AMSA National; Elizabeth Ingraham, Assistant Vice President, Communications and Outreach at the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates; and Dr. Anthony Orsini, Neonatologist, Orlando Health, and Founder of the Breaking Bad News Foundation.

“This year’s speakers not only shared insights on residency preparedness but also techniques for having tough conversations, such as delivering bad news to patients and providing help on how to navigate ethical dilemmas that challenge physicians today,” said Ms. Wong.

Brushing up on anatomy and building clinical skills with an ultrasound lab.

St. George’s University Awards Scholarships to 122 Incoming Students

Legacy of Excellence and Chancellor’s Circle Legacy of Excellence scholarship recipients gather for a group photo on the upper True Blue Campus.

St. George’s University has awarded more than $800,000 in scholarships to 122 members of the School of Medicine’s incoming class of 2021.

“Here at St. George’s, we aim to help talented students from around the world achieve their goal of becoming doctors, irrespective of their social or economic backgrounds” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “Our scholarship recipients are enormously accomplished and we are excited to welcome them to school this fall.”

Seventy-nine incoming students received Legacy of Excellence Scholarships in recognition of their strong MCAT scores and records of academic excellence. St. George’s has offered these $60,000 scholarships for more than a decade.

Forty-three students received the Chancellor’s Circle of Legacy of Excellence scholarship, an $80,100 award for those with undergraduate GPAs of 3.7 or higher, science GPAs of 3.5 or higher, and MCAT scores of 506 or higher. St. George’s has offered these scholarships for the past eight years.

“We believe financial need shouldn’t stop aspiring physicians from serving their communities,” said Dr. Olds. “We hope that these scholarship recipients will graduate from St. George’s determined to bring their newfound medical expertise to areas most in need.”

This year’s recipients join more than 5,000 students who have received academic scholarships from the University. In total, SGU has granted more than $100 million in scholarships.

St. George’s University to Host Council for Education in the Commonwealth Annual Conference in 2019

Long a hub for international education, St. George’s University has been selected to host the Council for Education in the Commonwealth (CEC) Annual Conference in 2019. Hundreds of educators, policy makers, and education experts from around the world will gather in True Blue to discuss current issues and developments in the field of education and to identify ways to foster educational cooperation.

Glen Jacobs, Professor and Vice Provost for Educational Services at SGU, presented to more than 200 delegates at last month’s CEC conference in Windhoek, Namibia, and also delivered a keynote address.

The conference—titled “Leading the Elephant Out of the Bush: Education and Business Together Bridging the Gap”—focused on a variety of topics including ways to create business alliances that promote innovation, enterprise, and 21st century workplace skills; the ever-increasing role of digital learning and teaching; and strengthening the bridge between schools, tertiary education, and industry.

When the CEC comes to True Blue, Grenada will become the first Caribbean site to host the CEC conference in the organization’s 50-year history.

“We are delighted to be hosting the CEC’s annual conference in 2019,” Dr. Jacobs said. “Our university is at the center of international medical education, and it is fitting that we can provide a platform for an organization that conducts such vital work in promoting education across the Commonwealth. The theme ‘Student Success’ is directly relevant to our mission, and we are excited to provide engagement and collaboration on this topic with key constituents in the region and across the Commonwealth.”

Dr. Jacobs served as a keynote speaker on day two of the Namibia conference, presenting on the topic “Building Capacity Through Tertiary Education: The Role of Quality and Relevance in Best Practice.” He joined SGU’s Department of Educational Services (DES) in 1997, and it now welcomes close to 100 percent of the University’s students to participate in its innovative programs that assist with enhancing skills in time management, note-taking, the utilization of technology effectively in teaching and learning, as well as reading efficiency, writing, and oral communication. In addition, the Department’s faculty development program introduces new and evolving methods of instruction to faculty across all schools.

“If we accept students to an institution, it is our moral obligation to give them the academic support they need to be successful,” Dr. Jacobs said. “By implementing best practices in academic student support, it also helps institutions be sustainable.”

DES’s efforts have garnered three awards from the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA). Most recently, its Academic Enhancement Program (AEP) received NACADA’s Outstanding Institutional Advising Program Certificate of Merit Award in 2015.

Young Grenadians Turn Out in Record Numbers for SGU’s 2017 Career Day

Ten years since its inception, the St. George’s University and Rotaract Club of Grenada Career Day continues to be a success story, this year attracting more than 1,600 secondary school students and young adults from all over the country to the University’s True Blue campus.

Offering more career presentations than ever before, Career Day shined a light on fields such as luxury yachting, architectural design, accounting and finance, culinary arts, environmental sciences, physiotherapy, and public relations. In addition, Career Day representatives provided guidance on how to finance higher education, how to prepare for interviews, and how to dress appropriately in the workplace.

“St. George’s University provides an ideal venue to offer this kind of guidance to students in answering the oft-difficult question of what career to choose and empowering them to make that choice,” said Colin Dowe, Associate Dean of Enrollment Planning at SGU. “It is critical for our young Grenadians to think beyond a secondary education and to seek careers that utilize both their interests and strengths as they continue to develop for themselves, their families, and their country.”

In a continued effort to provide students the opportunity to experience more than the usual two presentations, this year’s Career Day also implemented for the first time the Career Track System. Four different career tracks were set up in each of the major halls on campus and students would remain seated as they listened to presentations in subjects related to their chosen field. The new system was effective in cutting down on assembly time, as students didn’t have to scour the entire campus to get to their different career listings. Another first was the introduction of the School of Arts and Sciences Alumni Interactive Session, which gave the students a break between each session and the chance to connect with SGU alumni.

Additional contributors to Career Day’s success were the Radioactive Grenada youth group, who served as both support staff and recorded the event’s welcome message. SGU’s Psychological Services Center (PSC) were also on hand to conduct student surveys to assess which personality traits would lend themselves to different types of careers.

Mr. Dowe once again led the ever-popular informative and interactive session for parents, for which attendance more than doubled that of the 2016 session.

“The parents’ session was very valuable, especially the 10 steps on helping your child choose a career path,” shared Cecil Noel. The retired Cable and Wireless representative was integral in setting up most of SGU’s telecommunications at the school’s inception and admits his bias in gladly sending his daughter to SGU. “I’ve always longed for the day that the University would be offering more than just a degree in medicine, and now with the School of Arts and Sciences, when the time comes, my daughter can reap the benefits of that.”

As the largest private employer in Grenada, the University continues to fulfill its mandate of being a good corporate citizen by taking the opportunity to expose these students to options beyond the traditional. With Career Day 2017, SGU hoped to assist students in making informed career choices and motivating them along their journey towards educational and career fulfillment.

Located Below the Hurricane Belt, St. George’s University Aids Its Northern Neighbors in Need

St. George’s University students, faculty, and staff are collaborating to lend a hand to citizens of Caribbean islands impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Grenada is, thankfully, south of the usual hurricane path and can assist its northern neighbors. The recent wave of storms has personally affected the friends and families of many students and staff members from the Caribbean.

“The people and the infrastructure in these countries have been dramatically affected by these storms, and it’s important that we band together to do what we can to assist in the relief efforts,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University.

On Wednesday and Thursday, SGU rallied together to make significant contributions to those in need, donating everything from non-perishable food and gently used clothing to toiletries and water to drop-off locations at Charter Hall and Bourne Hall. Representatives from the University’s Student Government Association will take inventory of donated items in preparation of delivery next week through Grenada’s National Disaster Management Agency (NaDMA), which is working with the Red Cross and other organizations to coordinate relief efforts in the region.

In addition, individuals have made monetary contributions to NaDMA through the Grenada Cooperative Bank. The Dean of Students office and Psychological Services Center have also been open to all those in need of assistance.

“In their time of need, we need to be an institution and a community that they can lean on,” Dr. Olds said. “We preach compassion and altruism in everything that we do and in day-to-day life, and this is a prime example of when we need to be here for people who need us.”

Next month, the undergraduate student organization ECO (Education Conservation Outreach) is planning a faculty and student talent and fashion show, with models wearing clothing made entirely of recycle goods and/or local, natural products. All funds generated from the event—set for October 27—will be given to relief organizations providing aid in Antigua, Barbuda, and Dominica.

Tickets will be on sale at the Student Center beginning on October 19. Individuals interested in participating in the event can email ECO President Michelle Taylor at mtaylor2@sgu.edu.

Faculty Members Present at International Medical Illustration Conference

Two faculty members in St. George’s University’s Department of Anatomical Sciences, Wes Price and Xochitl Vinaja, delivered a full-day digital sculpting course to professional scientific artists at the 72nd Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI) Conference held in Austin, TX, on July 23.

The workshop covered the basics of sculpting anatomical models in virtual digital clay using the software ZBrush. Once these models are created on the computer, an illustrator can use them to teach complex scientific concepts in a variety of ways, from turning them into book illustrations to creating a 3D print.

More than 20 medical and scientific artists from all over North America were in attendance, including illustrators for the Mayo Clinic, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Smithsonian Institution, and Scientific American.

In addition, Dr. Marios Loukas, the Dean of Basic Sciences and Professor in the Department of Anatomical Sciences, presented a plenary session titled “Common Anatomical Mistakes in Cardiac Anatomy” to the AMI, emphasizing the need for illustrators to draw directly from the source—the human body—in order to avoid mistakes and misconceptions.

SGU faculty members Xochitl Vinaja, Quade Paul and Wes Price organized a day-long digital sculpting course.

Department of Anatomical Sciences faculty attending the meeting included Jessica Holland, Marios Loukas, Xochitl Vinaja, and Katie Yost.