Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy Draws Rave Reviews

For the past year and a half, 17-year-old Marco Turner mulled the idea of becoming a veterinarian. Originally from the Bahamas, he had volunteered in a veterinarian’s office, where he helped nurse the community’s pets back to health, and then began researching opportunities that would help further his career in veterinary medicine.

Enter the St. George’s University Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy, which has welcomed nearly 900 aspiring physicians and veterinarians to Grenada to receive an insider’s view of their future careers since 2002. In the program’s 15-year history, 46 Academy graduates have gone on to enroll in the School of Medicine or Veterinary Medicine.

“This experience so far has been great,” said Mr. Turner. “Today, we had a suture clinic where we learned how to do three different kinds of suture patterns. While working at a vet’s office, I would see these sutures done, and I always wished that I could do it myself. Now I have the chance.

“This has been a valuable opportunity for my own learning and development that I would definitely recommend to anyone interested in a med or vet program.”

This summer, 74 students hailing from the United States, Canada, Trinidad, Bahamas, Bermuda, United Kingdom, and Puerto Rico successfully balanced a challenging academic program with extracurricular activities such as hiking, sailing, and snorkeling. Both the med and vet students engaged in courses that combined didactic lectures, small-group problem solving sessions, practical lab work in state-of-the-art facilities, and hands-on training through simulated and real-life situations.

This year’s class included Charlize Espinoza, who had undoubtedly been regaled with stories of SGU by her aunt, Cholene Espinoza, MD SGU ’15, now a PGY-3 OB/GYN resident at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. When asked in kindergarten what she wanted to be when she grew up, Charlize replied “a doctor.” A decade later, that answer still hasn’t changed.

“I jumped at the chance to attend the Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy because I really wanted the opportunity to plan out my future and get a glimpse of what attending medical school would be like,” Ms. Espinoza said. “However, as someone who suffers from anxiety attacks, I thought this might not be right for me—being in a different country, living in dorms, and being away from my parents. But since being here, I haven’t had any anxiety issues. Instead, I’m really enjoying this experience, and everyone has been so warm and welcoming. It’s been a very intensive program so far but the lectures are very interesting and the doctors are very accessible. The Academy is a great place to test the waters and get ready for medical school.”

In 2017, four Academy alumni—Kristen Sellar, DVM; Abigail Maynard, DVM; Lisa Dyke, MD; and Virginia Vazzana, MD—earned their degrees at commencement in New York City. Dr. Vazzana, daughter of SGU alumnus Thomas Vazzana, MD SGU ’85, attended the Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy in 2010 after it received rave reviews from her older sister, who had attended three years earlier. She accepted a seat at SGU’s School of Medicine, where she met and married her classmate Hamfreth Shaul Rahming, MD SGU ’17. Dr. Vazzana began her pediatric residency at The Dwaine and Cynthia Willet Children’s Hospital of Memorial Health University Medical Center in Savannah, Georgia, this month.

“The Academy was truly the first experience that I had of what medical school and becoming a physician is really like,” stated Dr. Vazzana. “I still remember the first time I worked on a human cadaver, the first time I wore a white coat and shadowed doctors to see real patients, the first time I learned to use an ultrasound machine, and so much more. These things all happened at the Academy. For me, being exposed to these opportunities really was a perfect way to confirm what I wanted to do with my future and is a huge reason I became a doctor.”

St. George’s University Honored by Chicago’s Norwegian American Hospital

Daniel Ricciardi, MD SGU ’81, Dean of Clinical Studies (left) and Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University, accepted the Power of Community Award from Jose R. Sanchez, President and Chief Executive Officer, Norwegian American Hospital.

CHICAGO — On June 22, St. George’s University received Norwegian American Hospital’s Power of Community Award for its leadership in the quest to provide quality care to patients across Chicago.

“We are privileged to receive this honor from our friends at Norwegian American Hospital,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “We have made educating the primary care workforce of the future our mission, and we are grateful that Norwegian American Hospital supports that mission.”

Power of Community Award recipients are selected for their dedication to the community served by Norwegian American Hospital and their efforts to provide great medical care in the area. This is the third year the award was presented.

The award ceremony coincided with the inauguration of Norwegian American Hospital’s newly-accredited Family Residency Training Program, which will begin training medical graduates on July 1. The program was developed to address the shortage of primary care physicians in Illinois. There are less than 13,000 primary care doctors available to serve Illinois’s population of nearly 13 million.

“The shortage of primary care physicians is one of the chief public health challenges our state faces,” said Jose Sanchez, Chief Executive Officer of Norwegian American Hospital. “Together with St. George’s University, we look forward to doing our part to help solve it.”

Class of 2017 Veterinarians Take Next Step in Their Journeys

Commencement marked the ending of one chapter and the beginning of another for St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine’s Class of 2017. Before setting off to begin their careers as practicing veterinarians, they convened on June 11 at Lincoln Center in New York City to celebrate their collective success.

This year’s class of veterinarians hailed from 10 countries, as far away as Taiwan, India, and Botswana. Among the 2017 graduates was Abigail Maynard, DVM SGU ’17, from Barbados, who became the first doctor in her family on Sunday. Dr. Maynard plans to go into mixed animal practice before joining the public health residency program at the University of Minnesota. At graduation, she was cheered on by her parents, grandmother, and godmother.

“I feel really overwhelmed right now. I just can’t believe that the dream that I’ve had since I was 6 years old is finally coming true,” shared Dr. Maynard. “I felt very prepared by SGU especially during my clinical year. Comparing myself to other clinical students, I felt there were definitely certain areas in which I was leagues ahead of them. Today, my classmates and I are reunited, and after all our hard work I’m just so happy that we are here to achieve our dreams together.”

Hooded by her uncle, Dr. Albert D. Franklin, a medical infirmary practitioner, an emotional Devan Sacknoff, DVM SGU ’17, became the first veterinarian in her family. Dr. Sacknoff, who admitted to eyeing a career in veterinary medicine since the fourth grade, was joined at David Geffen Hall by her parents, aunt, and uncle. After graduation, she is applying to be a general practitioner in Huntington Beach, California.

“It doesn’t seem real; I’m still in shock,” said Dr. Sacknoff. “It feels amazing to be here, and I’m so glad to see everyone again after being apart for a year.”

A new addition to the program, this year’s ceremony featured heartfelt words by a class member— Clarence Williams, DVM SGU ’17—who was nominated by the graduands to speak on their behalf. Currently working in a small animal clinic in south New Jersey in emergency and clinical care, Dr. Williams shared pleasant memories of their time in True Blue.

“We’ve been on a wonderful journey these past four years. It has been extremely tough. We’ve learned a lot of information and we’re going to have to continue to learn more information,” said Dr. Williams. “But despite all our sacrifices, we did it; we’re veterinarians now, we’re doctors. It’s still hard to believe, but we didn’t do it alone. We had help from our great professors and all these memories have helped me realize that we’ve been like a family—an SGU family.”

Although unable to attend the ceremony in person, Dr. Eduardo Durante, Senior Associate Dean, was awarded the Distinguished Service Award for his longtime contributions to SGU in small animal medicine and surgery at the Small Animal Clinic. During his tenure at SGU, Dr. Durante also served as Acting Dean in 2013, and Associate Dean of Faculty and Academic Programs in SVM in 2010 and again in 2013.

SVM Dean Dr. Timothy Ogilvie, who accepted the award on Dr. Durante’s behalf, was also recognized by Chancellor Modica and President Olds for his outstanding service to the University during his three-year term. Dr. Neil C. Olson, the former Dean of University of Missouri School of Veterinary Medicine, will officially assume the same position at SGU on August 15.

Since opening its doors in 1999, SGU’s School of Veterinary Medicine has graduated more than 1,200 veterinarians from 29 countries. These alumni have gone on to practice in 47 US states and 10 countries around the world.

Newest St. George’s University Physicians Rewarded For Their Commitment

From all around the world and all walks of life, the St. George’s University School of Medicine Class of 2017 came to Grenada to pursue their dreams of becoming a physician. On June 10 and 11 at Lincoln Center in New York City, they were rewarded for their commitment to their profession and their future, earning the degree of Doctor of Medicine at SGU’s commencement ceremony.

This year’s class is comprised of graduates from 86 countries, from Afghanistan to Zambia. They join the more than 17,000 alumni of St. George’s University, including over 14,000 physicians.

“Graduates, this is truly your day, one in which we celebrate your accomplishments and pause for a moment to dream with you of your future,” said Dr. Joseph Childers, Provost. “As much as this ceremony symbolizes an end to your formal studies at SGU, it also signifies our faith in you, our unshakeable belief that you are moving forward fully prepared to handle the intellectual and professional challenges that you will inevitably face.”

2017 Caribbean medical school graduates read a professional oath.“On behalf of the faculty, staff, and administration of St. George’s University, I want to congratulate all of you in the graduating class of 2017,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President. “I also want to congratulate the other people in this audience, without whom this graduation would not have been possible – your family, friends, loved ones, and spouses. Thank you for making this day possible.”

The first to cross the stage on Saturday was Grace Lepis, MD SGU ’17, who was overjoyed to have matched into a categorical surgery residency at Monmouth Medical Center in Long Branch, NJ. Since completing her basic sciences in Grenada, she has returned to the island twice, including for her honeymoon.

“I love the island and I love the University,” Dr. Lepis said. “SGU gave me an opportunity that nobody else gave me. To be here at graduation is very exciting. It’s a humbling experience. We all worked very hard to get to this point, and I’m proud of myself and all of my classmates.”

Eight years ago, Janish Kothari, MD SGU ’17, watched his sister, Megha, graduate from SGU and move on to a career in gastroenterology. Her example and mentorship helped Dr. Kothari through the challenges of medical school. He will begin an internal medicine residency at New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn this summer.International medical school graduate at commencement.

“Everything flew by so quickly,” Dr. Kothari said. “I remember getting off the plane in Grenada, and now I’m standing here with my robe and getting ready for residency. It’s a surreal moment. I’m very excited to see what the future has in store for me, and can sincerely say that SGU has prepared me for whatever challenges I may face. I wouldn’t change anything.”

In addressing the graduates and their families, Chancellor Modica took a moment to recognize Nelly Golarz de Bourne, the former Dean of Women and Chair of Histology at SGU and widow of the University’s first Vice Chancellor, Geoffrey Bourne. Dr. Golarz was on hand to watch her grandson, Dr. Gordon Bourne, take the Hippocratic Oath.

“Dr. Bourne and Dr. Golarz made this University what it is today, more than anyone, in the first 10 years of its existence,” Chancellor Modica said. “It’s a great honor to know that Geoffrey, looking down on us now, can see his grandson graduate.”

The Chancellor also awarded Dr. Allen Pensick, Provost Emeritus of St. George’s University, with a Distinguished Service Medal for his more than 30 years of service to the University and Grenadian community, including as Provost from 2004 to 2016. Dr. Pensick’s roles also included Dean of Basic and Allied Health Sciences, Chairman of the University Council of Deans, and Chairman of the School of Medicine Faculty Senate. Bell Hall, an iconic building on True Blue’s upper campus, was renamed Allen H. Pensick Hall in 2011.

St. George’s University to Welcome Renowned Veterinary Anesthetists at First AVA Meeting in Caribbean

Grenada will be at the center of veterinary anesthesia discussion worldwide next spring as more than 200 leading experts in the field will descend on the island for the semi-annual Association of Veterinary Anesthetists (AVA) conference. Usually convened in Europe where the organization was founded, this will mark the first time in the organization’s history that the conference has been held in the Caribbean.

Dr. Karin Kalchofner Guerrero, Associate Professor in Veterinary Anesthesia at St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine, worked diligently to arrange the meeting in Grenada, for which SGU and the Radisson Grenada Beach Resort in Grand Anse will serve as hosts.

“The AVA meetings attract veterinary anesthetists, surgeons, technicians, researchers and other professionals from across the globe,” commented Dr. Guerrero. “Having the conference here will provide a great opportunity to showcase the evolution of SGU over the last 40 years into one of the world’s most renowned centers of international education today.”

Themed “Anesthesia and Analgesia—Myths and Misconceptions,” the conference will feature lectures and abstract sessions from a wide range of delegates. Presentations include “Pain in Mice and Man: Ironic Adventures in Translation” by Dr. Jeffrey Mogil, Pain Genetics Lab, McGill University, Canada; “Evaluating recovery of horses from anesthesia: moving beyond the subjective” by Dr. Stuart Clark-Price, University of Illinois; and “Safe anesthesia in young children: what really matters”, by Prof. Markus Weiss, Anesthesiologist-in-Chief, University Children’s Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland.

The meeting, which will take place March 11-13, 2018, will also feature a pre-congress day, which is aimed at interns, residents, practitioners, and anyone who shares a common interest in anesthesia, analgesia, and animal welfare to exchange ideas, expand their knowledge, and develop new skills.

Recent meetings have been held in such locations as Paris, France; Helsinki, Finland; and Santorini, with the Fall 2017 meeting scheduled for Berlin, Germany. Dr. Guerrero believes that SGU provides the perfect platform for members of the veterinary anesthesia community to collaborate on utilizing and developing new and established techniques, drugs and ideas, as well as, promote their brand awareness and engagement, and network with veterinary professionals from around the globe.

 

Grenada Class of 2017 Encouraged to Climb From “Good to Great”

With an excellent education under their wings, sound advice to lean on and the world before them, greatness is within reach for the St. George’s University Class of 2017.

Such was explained by those who addressed the more than 300 graduates at this month’s commencement ceremony in Grenada, including an SGU alumnus who once stood in the graduates’ shoes. Joel Jack, BSc SGU ’03, an Assemblyman of the Tobago House of Assembly (THA) and the Keynote Speaker for the evening, implored his fellow alumni to find their passion, prepare for change, and embrace the future, citing Jim Collins’ inspirational book, “Good to Great.”

“When what you are deeply passionate about and what drives your economic engine come together, not only does your work move towards greatness but so too does your life,” said Mr. Jack, Deputy Chief Secretary and Secretary of Finance and the Economy of THA. “For in the end, it is impossible to have a great life unless it is a meaningful life.”

Blossom Philbert, 2017 SAS Valedictorian

Joining him in the family of SGU alumni were graduates representing 33 countries across the globe. The 2017 class included nearly 150 students from the School of Arts and Sciences and more than 120 from the School of Graduate Studies. In addition, medical doctorates were conferred on 65 Caribbean graduates, with one new Grenadian veterinarian in attendance. Ceremonies for the Schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine will take place in June at New York City’s Lincoln Center.

In her address to the crowd, valedictorian Blossom Philbert, BSc ’17, also quoted Collins, saying “greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, it turns out, is a matter of conscious choice.” She went on to compare life to that of a book, but unlike the chapters of their textbooks, they could not flip forward to see how many more pages were left.

“My next chapter might last four years, whereas the person sitting next to me might write six chapters in four years,” Ms. Philbert said. “It matters not as along as those chapters are representative of the journey that leads to a life full of greatness, which will ultimately give a pleasant read when we flip back through its pages.”

Among the degrees conferred by the School of Graduate Studies, Dr. Trevor Noel became the fifth student — and first Grenadian—to earn his Doctor of Philosophy at SGU. Dr. Noel was simultaneously inducted into the Gamma Kappa Chapter of the Delta Omega Public Health Honor Society for his extraordinary service to public health and invaluable contributions to the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF).

Dr. Rudi Webster

St. George’s University also recognized Dr. Rudi Webster with its Distinguished Service Award for his work spanning the fields of medicine, sports, diplomacy, and politics. Dr. Webster was instrumental in establishing the Shell Cricket Academy at SGU, where he served as Academy Director – an endeavor which signified that SGU was not just a medical school but much more. Several of SGU’s Shell Academy graduates went on to play for the West Indies cricket team, including Darren Sammy, who captained the team to two consecutive T20 World Cups.

“To this year’s graduates, all that you have achieved so far shows what you have learned and what you have done,” stated Dr. Webster. “However, it does not reflect what you can learn, and what you can become. That should be your focus now.”

“Many of us in the Caribbean believe that we are not good enough and that something is missing. This is incredible because the secret to our success already lies within us—it’s called self-acceptance. That was the secret of the West Indies Cricket team’s 15 years of success,” added Dr. Webster. “Self-acceptance is going to be the key to your success and it differs from self-confidence. Although your self-confidence may fluctuate depending on your success or failure, self-acceptance means you value yourself as a worthwhile human being regardless of if you succeed or you fail. We in the Caribbean are just as smart and have just as much talent as anyone else in the world, and I have proven that.”

Visionary: Chancellor Charles Modica Receives Mike Fisher Memorial Award

Dr. Charles R. Modica, founder and Chancellor of St George’s University, has received the 2017 Mike Fisher Memorial Award at a ceremony in the House of Lords in London.

Forty years ago, Chancellor Modica saw an opportunity to provide an international education to talented prospective medical students. The Charter MD class matriculated in January 1977, and since then more than 14,000 MD graduates have gone on to practice medicine in a variety of disciplines the world over.

The Mike Fisher Award – given annually since 2006 – acknowledges the work of the late Mike Fisher, formerly of the pharmaceutical company, Merck, whose original research led to the discovery of the drug Ivermectin, which has spared 35 million people in developing countries from blindness and disfigurement and provided domestic animals and livestock with healthier lives.

The award was presented to Dr. Modica in recognition of his achievements in founding and developing St George’s University, from a single MD program four decades ago to a University offering more than 53 programs through its School of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, School of Graduate Studies, and School of Arts and Sciences. With students and faculty drawn from 140 countries, approximately 20 percent of SGU’s alumni come from Commonwealth countries, with many returning home to practice medicine. In total, Dr. Modica’s efforts have produced over 17,000 graduates in the field of medicine, veterinary medicine, and public health.

Many of these graduates have subsequently made enormous contributions to the field of One Health and are working and practicing in more than 50 countries worldwide.

“Dr. Modica’s vision and leadership over the last 40 years have significantly impacted the health and wellbeing of millions of people and animals on all continents,” the award citation states. “The value of this contribution to mankind cannot be overstated and epitomizes the key characteristics of the Mike Fisher Memorial Award.”

The award was presented at the fourth WINDREF Dinner at the House of Lords in the British Parliament by Baroness Howells of St. Davids, President of the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF), the research institute on St. George’s University’s True Blue campus.

St. George’s University Honors Clinical Studies Pioneer Morris Alpert

Back in its infancy, St. George’s University School of Medicine was guided forward by Dr. Morris Alpert, a hand surgeon and anatomist with a personality as unique as his expertise. The Founding Dean of Kingstown Medical College (KMC) in St. Vincent and a longtime member of the Board of Trustees for St. George’s University, Dr. Alpert built the foundation for SGU’s clinical studies program, creating a bridge between Grenada and the United States and the world that still exists today.

The University honored Dr. Alpert by unveiling a bronze plaque highlighting his accomplishments at a dedication ceremony on March 29 on the True Blue campus. Held outside Morris Alpert Hall, the ceremony was attended by University administrators, faculty, staff, and SOM alumni who knew and enjoyed the company of Dr. Alpert.

He came to SGU from Albany Medical College, where he had been Chair of Surgery. Dr. Alpert’s approach of using a modular system with leading specialists from the US, UK, and the world helped transform the School of Medicine in its early years.

“Starting off with not much—a lecture hall, a small dorm facility and two secretaries—Dr. Alpert single-handedly created the clinical program at KMC,” said Dr. C.V. Rao, Dean of Students. “He was a kind man but very strict and truly cared about all his students. And they also felt the same way, evidenced by the standing ovation he would receive when attending the SOM graduation ceremony in New York.”

“As SGU celebrates the first 40 years of its existence, what better way to do this than a formal dedication to Dr. Morris Alpert—honoring him for both his unique vision and leadership style which served our University well,” added Dr. Allen Pensick, Provost Emeritus. “For our students, there were at least 28 years of classes, twice a year, that went through St. Vincent. A great deal of our students and alumni met Dr. Alpert and got a real-life taste of medicine and how to conduct themselves in the real world.”

A member of the 1977 Charter Class, Dr. Emmett Cox II suffered a tragic bike accident early on in his studies at SGU. The first to treat Dr. Cox was Dr. Alpert, who saved his student’s life. Dr. Cox, has since become a successful orthopedic surgeon—and a hand surgeon like his mentor, Dr. Alpert.

“He was such a strong-willed person and yet so polite. He would tell us to respect our patients and learn our anatomy, and take time out to do a standard physical examination,” recalled Dr. Cox. “I feel so proud to have been trained and received my tutelage from Dr. Alpert. He taught us to never give up on your dreams no matter what. If he told you something, you could bank on it. And in my lifetime, he was a giant.”

The bronze plaque is only the most recent way in which St. George’s University has saluted Dr. Alpert’s impactful role in its growth and success. In addition to dedicating the building of Morris Alpert Hall to his memory, the Morris Alpert Scholarships exist in honor of the high moral and ethical standards he set for his students during his tenure on the faculty of St. George’s University. Dr. Alpert’s knowledge, dedication, and enthusiasm exemplified the University’s commitment to taking the practice of medicine to new and unanticipated heights.

12th Annual SGU Knowledge Bowl Champions Achieve Record Breaking Scores

Affectionately called the battle between the “Brothers and Sisters of Tanteen”, an exciting showdown between the gentlemen of Grenada Boys Secondary School (GBSS) and the ladies of Anglican High School (AHS) concluded the 12th season of the St. George’s University Knowledge Bowl. Squaring off for the second time in the history of the competition, the all-boys ensemble of GBSS sought to redeem itself after the school’s loss in 2008 at the hands of its neighboring rivals.

At the final match held at SGU’s Charter Hall on April 1, not only did the boys get their redemption with a 67-37 victory in the finale, but they achieved an all-time high score for the tournament. The previous record of 65 had been held by Westmorland Secondary School since its victory in 2011. The win earns GBSS its second championship after winning season two of the SGU Knowledge Bowl a decade ago.

“We are so very proud of our students. They’ve done an excellent job especially being undefeated all season and really living up to our school motto: Non Palma Sine Labore (No Reward Without Labour),” praised Coach Korrine Hobson-Mitchell. “They put in the hard work and are now reaping the rewards.”

For the school, the GBSS team was presented with the coveted Knowledge Bowl Challenge trophy and awarded $15,000 from St. George’s University. Additionally, each of the five team members – Bjorn Bubb, Tyler John, Darrell Simon, Rich Charles, and Azam Edwards – received a laptop and six months complimentary broadband service from FLOW, along with their choice of $500 in a Super Starter or Honey Bee account from Grenada Co-operative Bank, a certificate of distinction, and a supply of Ribena. Their coaches were awarded a tablet and six months complimentary broadband service from FLOW, and $500 credited to a Grenada Co-operative Bank account.

“By participating in this competition, I feel we got a bit of firsthand knowledge of what to expect when doing our CSEC exams,” said Mr. Charles. “The same type of pressure we experienced here today is most likely what it will feel like during our final exams. Having gone through this process will definitely help us be more prepared and better able to handle the pressure of exams. As for my fellow teammates, we were always a group of close friends but working so closely together, all those long days and nights made us even stronger brothers than we already were.”

Continuing to raise the standard of competition, it was the second year the double-elimination format was utilized. This season also welcomed newcomers J.W. Fletcher Catholic Secondary School, which, although it did not advance in the competition, received an honorable mention.

SGU Knowledge Bowl remains a source of great anticipation, garnering huge support each year as students, faculty, and fans come out to cheer for their favorite teams. It continues to encourage and promote friendly competition between Grenada’s secondary schools. In addition to primary sponsorships from St. George’s University and FLOW, local businesses Grenada Co-operative Bank, George F. Huggins, and Glenelg Spring Water sponsor the SGU Knowledge Bowl, which is regarded as the “Intercol of Academia.”

New York City Council Honors St. George’s University’s CityDoctors Scholarship Program for Addressing Primary Care Shortage

NEW YORK (April 5) – Today, the New York City Council issued a proclamation honoring St. George’s University (SGU) for establishing the CityDoctors Scholarship Program, which covers tuition for SGU medical students who commit to working with underserved patients in the city’s public health care system.

“We are grateful for the New York City Council’s recognition of the good work that our CityDoctors scholarship recipients are doing in New York’s neediest neighborhoods,” said Charles Modica, Chancellor of St. George’s University. “And we at St. George’s look forward to educating the next generation of CityDoctors scholars, who are making an honorable commitment to serve the people of New York.”

St. George’s University established the CityDoctors Scholarship Program in partnership with NYC Health + Hospitals to support students from New York City who might otherwise be unable to afford medical school. Students commit to one year of service with NYC Health + Hospitals for each year of scholarship aid they receive.

This year, the program will award $1.5 million in scholarships to 12 recipients from New York City and its surrounding area, who will commit to practicing primary care medicine in the city’s public health care system after graduation. Since its start in 2012, the CityDoctors program has awarded full- and partial-tuition scholarships to 112 students, totaling more than $12 million in medical school scholarships.

“The collaboration with St. George’s University has enabled more than 80 students the opportunity not only to continue their education, but to have job security following graduation,” said Machelle Allen, MD, Chief Medical Officer, NYC Health + Hospitals. “The program also helps bring more primary care physicians into the workforce and into communities across the city, where they are so desperately needed. Thank you to the New York City Council for acknowledging this important program.”

“St. George’s is committed to educating the top-notch medical graduates that the United States needs to close its doctor shortage,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, president of St. George’s University. “The CityDoctors Scholarship Program stands out as a great example of how medical schools can work with hospitals to do just that.”