St. George’s University Graduate Elected President of New Jersey Academy of Family Physicians

A primary care physician in the state for more than 30 years, Peter Carrazzone, MD SGU ’83, has been named President of the New Jersey Academy of Family Physicians (NJAFP), and will represent the membership and its best interests during his term of office.

Dr. Carrazzone practices family medicine with Vanguard Medical Group in North Haledon, NJ. He is also the Medical Director for the John Victor Machuga Diabetic Center at St. Joseph’s Wayne Hospital.

“I can promise this board will be focused and work tirelessly to improve the Academy and the landscape for family physicians in this state,” he said during his acceptance speech at the NJAFP’s Annual Scientific Assembly in Atlantic City on June 27.

Peter Carrazzone, MD SGU ’83

The NJAFP, the largest primary care medical specialty society in the state, is comprised of more than 2,000 physicians statewide, and is a leader in health care practice transformation and advocacy. Dr. Carrazzone has chaired the Academy’s Government Affairs Committee for the past three years, and as President, pledged to represent all NJAFP members, from the debt-ridden family medicine resident, to the family physician working in academic medicine, to the solo and large group family physicians and more.

Dr. Carrazzone said he has two primary focuses for his tenure as president – addressing family medicine resident debt and loan forgiveness, and a thorough review of the state’s family practice bylaws. He said that New Jersey has been dubbed a “primary care desert,” with family physicians leaving the state to pursue higher-paying opportunities elsewhere. As a result, New Jersey has the second-highest cost of care per patient in the United States, yet ranks 49th according to quality-of-care metrics.

“For our patients, for our families, for the specialty of family medicine, this is the time we must be advocates,” he said. “This is the time we need to communicate to our legislators. This is the time our collective voice needs to be heard. This is the time to promote value and quality. This is the time to promote a stronger primary care infrastructure to insurances and our government. This is the time to cure a broken health care system. This is the time for family medicine.”

Upon graduating from SGU, Dr. Carrazzone completed his residency in family practice at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Paterson. In addition to his longstanding tenure with Vanguard, he has taught at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ).

Dr. Carrazzone came to St. George’s University in 1979, and has used the experience as a foundation for his career in medicine. Although he has yet to return to Grenada since his basic science studies, he routinely guides his alma mater’s clinical students who rotate through St. Joseph’s. “It’s a strong academic program,” he said. “The students are bright and motivated, and I don’t see much of a difference between them and students coming from US schools.”

Banner: Addressing Canada’s Rural Doctor Shortage

Sandra Banner

An opinion piece by Sandra Banner, former director of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) and currently a consultant at St. George’s University, appeared in the Vancouver Sun on Sunday, June 25.

In it, Ms. Banner explained how medical schools such as SGU address the rural doctor shortage in Canada, citing a Canadian Institute of Health Information report that states that fewer than half of residents can secure same-day or next-day appointments with their family doctors.

“Canada’s leaders must act to reverse these shortages,” Ms. Banner wrote. “Doing so will require an aggressive effort by medical schools and governments to encourage more young people to consider careers in family medicine—careers that have an outsized impact on the health of Canadians.”

St. George’s University has graduated more than 1,300 Canadian doctors, more than 70 percent of which have entered a career in primary care. Read the entire opinion piece by visiting the Vancouver Sun website.

Visionary: Chancellor Charles Modica Receives Mike Fisher Memorial Award

Dr. Charles R. Modica, founder and Chancellor of St George’s University, has received the 2017 Mike Fisher Memorial Award at a ceremony in the House of Lords in London.

Forty years ago, Chancellor Modica saw an opportunity to provide an international education to talented prospective medical students. The Charter MD class matriculated in January 1977, and since then more than 14,000 MD graduates have gone on to practice medicine in a variety of disciplines the world over.

The Mike Fisher Award – given annually since 2006 – acknowledges the work of the late Mike Fisher, formerly of the pharmaceutical company, Merck, whose original research led to the discovery of the drug Ivermectin, which has spared 35 million people in developing countries from blindness and disfigurement and provided domestic animals and livestock with healthier lives.

The award was presented to Dr. Modica in recognition of his achievements in founding and developing St George’s University, from a single MD program four decades ago to a University offering more than 53 programs through its School of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, School of Graduate Studies, and School of Arts and Sciences. With students and faculty drawn from 140 countries, approximately 20 percent of SGU’s alumni come from Commonwealth countries, with many returning home to practice medicine. In total, Dr. Modica’s efforts have produced over 17,000 graduates in the field of medicine, veterinary medicine, and public health.

Many of these graduates have subsequently made enormous contributions to the field of One Health and are working and practicing in more than 50 countries worldwide.

“Dr. Modica’s vision and leadership over the last 40 years have significantly impacted the health and wellbeing of millions of people and animals on all continents,” the award citation states. “The value of this contribution to mankind cannot be overstated and epitomizes the key characteristics of the Mike Fisher Memorial Award.”

The award was presented at the fourth WINDREF Dinner at the House of Lords in the British Parliament by Baroness Howells of St. Davids, President of the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF), the research institute on St. George’s University’s True Blue campus.

St. George’s University Partners with Canadore College to Offer Unique Biology Program

NORTH BAY, ONTARIO, CANADA and GRENADA, WEST INDIES (May 8) — Canadore College has entered a partnership that will enable qualified Canadore graduates to earn their Bachelor of Science degree at St. George’s University in marine, wildlife, and conservation biology.

“We are excited to offer Canadore students the chance to study biology in a unique setting, at our campus in the Caribbean,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “Our program will equip them with the tools they need to thrive in careers in the life sciences and conservation.”

In order to qualify for the St. George’s program, Canadore graduates must have excellent academic records and a passion for marine and wildlife conservation. They can apply after completing their first two years of undergraduate study and receiving their Environmental Technician – Protection and Compliance diplomas. Admitted students complete the last two years of their education at SGU and earn a Bachelor of Science.

Students will focus on issues related to climate change, water conservation, and sustainability. SGU’s location will offer them ample opportunity to conduct groundbreaking field work in disciplines like marine biology, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, and conservation. They’ll also have access to research partners at Grenada’s Fisheries Division, the Marine Protected Areas Program, and the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation, the on-campus research institute developed with the goal of advancing health and environmental development through research and education programs.

“This is a tremendous academic pathway for our graduates,” said Derek Erickson, Professor in Canadore College’s School of Environmental Studies and Biotechnology. “St. George’s approach to personalizing education and their integration of experiential learning opportunities, in the natural Caribbean environment, are truly unique and invaluable.”

St. George’s University maintains academic partnerships with dozens of educational institutions in 13 countries, including the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.

“SGU is committed to educating the next generation of leaders in health and the sciences from a global perspective,” said Dr. Olds. “We look forward to welcoming Canadore’s best and brightest to our campus for many years to come.”

12th Annual SGU Knowledge Bowl Champions Achieve Record Breaking Scores

Affectionately called the battle between the “Brothers and Sisters of Tanteen”, an exciting showdown between the gentlemen of Grenada Boys Secondary School (GBSS) and the ladies of Anglican High School (AHS) concluded the 12th season of the St. George’s University Knowledge Bowl. Squaring off for the second time in the history of the competition, the all-boys ensemble of GBSS sought to redeem itself after the school’s loss in 2008 at the hands of its neighboring rivals.

At the final match held at SGU’s Charter Hall on April 1, not only did the boys get their redemption with a 67-37 victory in the finale, but they achieved an all-time high score for the tournament. The previous record of 65 had been held by Westmorland Secondary School since its victory in 2011. The win earns GBSS its second championship after winning season two of the SGU Knowledge Bowl a decade ago.

“We are so very proud of our students. They’ve done an excellent job especially being undefeated all season and really living up to our school motto: Non Palma Sine Labore (No Reward Without Labour),” praised Coach Korrine Hobson-Mitchell. “They put in the hard work and are now reaping the rewards.”

For the school, the GBSS team was presented with the coveted Knowledge Bowl Challenge trophy and awarded $15,000 from St. George’s University. Additionally, each of the five team members – Bjorn Bubb, Tyler John, Darrell Simon, Rich Charles, and Azam Edwards – received a laptop and six months complimentary broadband service from FLOW, along with their choice of $500 in a Super Starter or Honey Bee account from Grenada Co-operative Bank, a certificate of distinction, and a supply of Ribena. Their coaches were awarded a tablet and six months complimentary broadband service from FLOW, and $500 credited to a Grenada Co-operative Bank account.

“By participating in this competition, I feel we got a bit of firsthand knowledge of what to expect when doing our CSEC exams,” said Mr. Charles. “The same type of pressure we experienced here today is most likely what it will feel like during our final exams. Having gone through this process will definitely help us be more prepared and better able to handle the pressure of exams. As for my fellow teammates, we were always a group of close friends but working so closely together, all those long days and nights made us even stronger brothers than we already were.”

Continuing to raise the standard of competition, it was the second year the double-elimination format was utilized. This season also welcomed newcomers J.W. Fletcher Catholic Secondary School, which, although it did not advance in the competition, received an honorable mention.

SGU Knowledge Bowl remains a source of great anticipation, garnering huge support each year as students, faculty, and fans come out to cheer for their favorite teams. It continues to encourage and promote friendly competition between Grenada’s secondary schools. In addition to primary sponsorships from St. George’s University and FLOW, local businesses Grenada Co-operative Bank, George F. Huggins, and Glenelg Spring Water sponsor the SGU Knowledge Bowl, which is regarded as the “Intercol of Academia.”

St. George’s University CME Examines Advances In Medicine Over Last 40 Years

Since opening its doors 40 years ago, St. George’s University has evolved from a mere idea into an international center for education. Health care, too, has witnessed significant advances that have changed the landscape of medicine. These innovations were examined and celebrated in concert with SGU’s milestone anniversary at March’s School of Medicine Alumni Association (SOMAA) continuing medical education conference in Grenada.

Titled “Advances in Medicine in the Last 40 Years,” the four-day conference was sponsored in part by Hackensack University Medical Center (HUMC) in New Jersey. It featured prominent SOM alumni and faculty presenters who presented on such topics as sepsis treatment, opioid abuse and solutions for health care providers, and the impact of infectious disease on society today.

In addition, SGU President Dr. G. Richard Olds delivered a presentation on “Building a Medical School Around Social Needs.”

“CME conferences are designed to educate physicians on what’s happening in practice, and in medicine. My presentation focused on what’s the latest we know in the education of physicians and how to design a medical to school to get a higher percentage in the future to better address the US health needs,” explained Dr. Olds. “This CME in particular was aimed at a broad group of physicians trying to give them updates in areas that are relevant to their practice but they may not individually be as up to date on.”

“As the academic sponsor, Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center is pleased to bring continuing medical education back to the island of Grenada,” said Dr. Joseph Feldman, MD SGU ’89, Chairman of Emergency Medicine, HUMC. “We look forward to partnering with SGU on this important initiative for many years to come and to expand the event, increasing the number of participants worldwide, to make it a truly international endeavor.”

More than 50 attended the CME, 44 of whom were SGU alumni, as well as 18 Grenadian physicians who practice locally. In addition to the seminars, the SOMAA provided plenty of opportunities to experience a taste of culture and hospitality on the island many of the attendees called home during their studies. The group enjoyed a sightseeing tour of Grenada’s natural beauty; lunch at Belmont Estate, a fully functional and historic plantation; a shopping tour of Grenada’s capital, St. George’s; a sunset barbecue; river tubing; and a Catamaran day cruise including snorkeling and a visit to the Underwater Sculpture Park and Hog Island; and lastly an alumni charity dinner with proceeds aiding the purchase of cardiology equipment for the SGU Physicians Network Program.

“Physicians are always looking for continuing medical education but this was also a chance for our graduates to come back to Grenada and celebrate 40 years of alumni achievements with their friends and colleagues,” said Dr. Bruce Bonanno, SOMAA President. “We are extremely pleased with the success of this event and can’t wait for the next CME in March 2018.”

Dr. Nadia Lopez Presents at 3rd SGU Principals and Teachers Forum

By attending the 3rd SGU Principals and Teachers Forum, more than 150 secondary and primary school educators were able to engage in critical dialogue on issues that impact their schools’ success and the major role they play in the development of Grenada’s most valuable capital – its children.

Held at Allen Pensick Hall on March 7, the event was the brainchild of Dr. Allen Pensick, Provost Emeritus of SGU, who encouraged the University’s administration to host a series of workshops that provided Grenadian instructors with an opportunity to empower themselves and improve the quality of education on the island as a whole.

“Teachers have extraordinary commitment. First of all, you’re committed to your students. The fact that you’re here today to discuss ideas and new ways and techniques to extend your own expertise to them – that speaks volumes,” said Dr. Joseph Childers, Provost, SGU. “Also, you’re committed to learning, to making yourself better, to learn to communicate better, to learn new approaches, and to learn from each other. But mostly, I want to thank you for your commitment to the future because what you do is perhaps the most important thing anyone can do. You are visionaries, and you are helping to shape our future.”

Delivering an inspirational keynote address, encompassing this year’s theme “Empowering Teacher Leaders”, Dr. Nadia Lopez is pioneering a path of outstanding leadership carrying her message to classrooms far from Brooklyn of how under-privileged communities can beat the odds and create positive institutions that have a global impact.

“My vision was to open a school to close a prison. So that every child will be able to take over this world, become globally competitive, and know that they have value,” shared Dr. Lopez, Principal, Mott Hall Bridges Academy, Brooklyn, NY. “My goals were to find teachers who are passionate about teaching, have compassion for the community they serve, and a willingness to learn; to ensure that students receive social and emotional support so they can access knowledge with confidence and develop strategies to navigate life; and to build partnerships that support learning and teaching, by providing resources for access and opportunities.”

As the Academy’s founding principal, Dr. Lopez rose to international fame after the popular photoblog, Humans of New York (HONY), featured one of her students touting her as the most influential person in his life. Millions of people around the world learned of the positive learning environment, high expectations, and growing success rate at a school right in the middle of one of the most underserved communities in America. Her success story was shared through numerous media outlets and resulted in Dr. Lopez’s guest appearance on the Ellen Show, a visit with President Barack Obama at the White House, and receiving the Medal of Distinction from Barnard College.

“As part of SGU’s educational outreach to the community of Grenada, it is important for us to work with our principals and teachers and support them in matters such as strengthening leadership,” commented Dr. Glen Jacobs, Vice Provost of Educational Services at SGU. “That’s why we felt it so necessary to have Dr. Lopez here to share her experience of not having many resources and how important it was for our educators to hear how she did it anyway.”

This year’s Principals Forum built on the success of last year’s event, more than doubling its attendance. “Considering that many of the Grenadian students may become future students at SGU, we believe that the more help we can provide in educating and empowering our school leaders, the better for everyone,” said Dr. Jacobs.”

Good Shepherd trains residents; some practice in East Texas 6/19/16

Nithin Nayini, MD SGU ’13, chose to start his career at Good Shepherd Medical Center in Texas as a hospitalist.

https://www.news-journal.com

Orlando medical examiner: ‘It looked like they just laid down’ 6/16/16

Joshua Stephany, MD SGU ’00, the Chief Medical Examiner in Florida District 9, is visited by CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta to discuss his role in overseeing the autopsy process following the Pulse tragedy in Orlando.

http://www.cnn.com

In Orlando, young Nebraska doctor found himself in trauma center full of ‘absolute chaos’ 6/14/16

Nicholas Sakis, MD SGU ’15, a surgery resident at Orlando Regional Medical Center, found himself in the throes of rescue efforts following the Pulse tragedy in Orlando.

http://www.starherald.com