SGU Dean of Basic Sciences Elected President of American Association of Clinical Anatomists

As a medical student at the University of Warsaw, Marios Loukas joined the American Association of Clinical Anatomists in 1997. Since then, the Dean of Basic Sciences and Professor in the Department of Anatomical Sciences at St. George’s University has been committed to teaching and studying anatomy, calling it the “foundation knowledge” for all physicians, as well as the foundation for his own career in medicine, academia, and research.

At the AACA annual meeting in Minneapolis last month, the organization’s members elected Dr. Loukas as its 18th president, 20 years since his entry into the AACA. In his new role, Dr. Loukas hopes to expand the visibility of anatomists across the scientific community, improve faculty development, and increase student membership. In addition, he aims to create a clinical anatomists certificate program that recognizes individuals’ excellence and dedication in the field of clinical anatomy.

“In anatomy, you not only learn what makes up the human body, but you learn the clinical application behind every bone, organ, nerve, artery, and more,” said Dr. Loukas.

Through his affiliation with the AACA, he met Drs. Peter Abrahams, Vishnu Rao, and Robert Jordan, who invited him to join SGU as an Associate Professor of Anatomy in 2005. Dr. Loukas has ascended to his current roles within the Department, and also serves as the University’s Dean of Basic Sciences and Research.

While the study of anatomy dates back thousands of years, Dr. Loukas said the most contemporary method of studying human anatomy is imaging—specifically ultrasound—for which the human body “comes to life.” Beginning in 2011, SGU integrated ultrasound education in its curriculum, with training sessions complementing relevant material taught in lectures, wet labs, and small-group discussion sessions. An additional outcome of such integration is availability of research opportunities for students and faculty. This year, five SGU medical students presented ultrasound research at the AACA meeting, including second-year student Jenna Kroeker, who was recognized for the best clinical anatomy poster presentation among 120 submissions.

University of Munich Recognizes SGU Professor for Lung Function Research

One of the most prestigious universities in Europe, the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) annually offers the Prize of the Munich University Society for outstanding scientific work by students. Among the winners of the six coveted spots for exceptional doctoral works was St. George’s University professor Dr. Maia Smith, whose research titled, “Associations Between Physical Activity and Lung Function in a Cohort of German Adolescents” garnered her both a certificate of recognition and the corresponding prize money of Euro 3,000.

“I’m beyond pleased and somewhat surprised at this honor,” said Dr. Smith, an Assistant Professor at SGU’s Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. “Among such impressive candidates from such diverse backgrounds, I feel extremely proud to have my work recognized.”

Touted as the largest cross-faculty support organization in Germany, the Society of friends and sponsors of LMU offers an annual incentive for young academics to intensify their scientific work. Up to six doctoral works and three habilitations are awarded, with the goal of directing the attention of a broader scientific public towards the particular achievement of the scientist.

Dr. Smith joined SGU this April to teach epidemiology and biostatistics. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in human ecology from the College of the Atlantic, a Master of Science from Drexel University in biostatistics, and a research doctorate in human biology from LMU. During her studies at LMU, she served as a graduate research assistant for Helmholtz Center in Munich, which develops personalized medical approaches for the prevention and therapy of major common diseases such as diabetes, lung disease, and allergy.

“I believe a combination of research support and relevant teaching is what will make a difference to young MD students, and it’s what brought me to SGU,” said Dr. Smith. “Science has always seemed like a universal language, and it’s very gratifying to see that others feel that way too.”

SGU Student Receives Prestigious Grant for Prostate Cancer Marker Research

Aleef Rahman’s commitment to prostate cancer research has been unwavering since it began, and now with a prestigious grant through the New York Academy of Medicine, the St. George’s University medical student can take his project—and his passion—even farther.

This spring, the Academy selected Mr. Rahman as the 2017 recipient of the Ferdinand C. Valentine Medical Student Research Grant in Urology. Mr. Rahman will conduct his research project, titled “Characterization and Validation of Novel Prostate Cancer Markers,” under the guidance of his mentor, Dr. Srinivas Pentyala, Director of Translational Research at Stony Brook University Medical Center in New York.

“When I received confirmation of this prestigious award, I was floored,” Mr. Rahman said. “I had previously received a research grant before, but this one being specifically from the New York Academy of Medicine was a great honor. It’s very humbling to know that only one or two people nationally get this award every year, and all the hard work that I put in has paid off.”

In addition to spending the next 10 to 12 weeks conducting research at SBU, Mr. Rahman is expected to present his research findings at the Academy’s annual Medical Student Forum in September, to an audience of Academy Fellows, faculty mentors, research colleagues, and fellow student grant awardees.

Research has always been a passion of Mr. Rahman’s, particularly throughout his years in undergraduate school at Stony Brook University and later in graduate school. Prior to enrolling at SGU, Mr. Rahman was the Director for Research in the Department of Surgery for Mount Sinai Services at Elmhurst Hospital Center. He then decided to combine his research skills with a medical degree to advance his professional career.

Working with Dr. Pentyala for almost a decade, Mr. Rahman’s research project will expand on his mentor’s previous discovery of three different diagnosis markers for prostate cancer. Mr. Rahman’s intention is to characterize what these markers look like, their genetic code, and how physicians in the future can utilize his findings as a novel marker for prostate cancer.

“Once this summer project is complete, my goal is to continue working with Dr. Pentyala, with the hope that one day doctors can use our results for earlier detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer,” added Mr. Rahman. “It’s exciting to think that the work we’re doing now can have a significant impact in saving the lives of patients in the future.”

St. George’s University Mourns Lord Soulsby of Swaffham Prior

Ernest Jackson Lawson Soulsby, Baron Soulsby of Swaffham Prior passed away on Monday at his home in Swaffham Prior. As the former President of the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation, former Chairman of the UK Board of Trustees for WINDREF, and a 20-year member of the Academic Board, he leaves behind a noteworthy legacy at St. George’s University. His remarkable career spanned five decades, during which he made significant contributions to veterinary and human medicine, global public health, parasitology, immunology, and zoonosis through his teaching, inspiring leadership, and scholarly contributions.

“Lord Soulsby’s contributions to WINDREF and St. George’s University leave an incredible legacy, but it is in his contributions to global health and education that his legacy will most endure,” said Calum Macpherson, Vice Provost for International Program Development, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, and Director of Research at St. George’s University, and Vice President and Director of WINDREF. “He will be missed by the many students and others who have met him as well as by the thousands who have relied upon his many publications, textbooks, and edited volumes in conducting their own research. His legacy in One Health One Medicine is indelible and his contributions will be missed.”

A distinguished microbiologist and parasitologist, and a leader in the US and UK worlds of veterinary medicine, Lord Soulsby was the first veterinary surgeon raised to the peerage in the United Kingdom.

He advised the UK government on animal welfare, science and technology, biotechnology, and environmental issues. He was President of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Royal Society of Medicine, the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee, the Royal Institute of Public Health, and the Royal Society for Public Health. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Biology, the Royal College of Pathologists, the Royal Society for Public Health, the Royal Society of Medicine, and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS).

His career included positions as Professor of Parasitology at the University of Pennsylvania and Professor of Animal Pathology at the University of Cambridge, where he was Dean for several years. Earlier, Lord Soulsby was in general veterinary practice in the north of England, a Veterinary Officer for the City of Edinburgh, and a lecturer in clinical parasitology at the University of Bristol. He was an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge, and an Emeritus Professor of the University of Cambridge.

Lord Soulsby was also a Visiting Professor at various universities in Europe, the Far East, South America, and the United States. He is an honorary member of numerous international parasitology societies and has been awarded nine honorary degrees and several awards for his research. He published 14 books, as well as many articles in various veterinary and parasitological journals.

In 2015, the RCVS awarded him the Queen’s Medal, its highest award for services to veterinary medicine. His global experience provided an incredible resource for international agencies and he served as an advisor and consultant to World Health Organization, Food and Agriculture Organization, Pan American Health Organization, United Nations Development Program, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Department for International Development, and to numerous governments and universities.

Lord Soulsby is survived by his daughter, Katrina, and his granddaughter, Kananu. His service will be held at the Church of St. Mary, Swaffham Prior, at 2:00 pm local time on Wednesday, May 24. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Soulsby Foundation.

Hemoglobinometer Donation Promises Patients Need No Longer Dread Finger Pricks

“No more tears” was the promise made to the patients of the Pediatric Ward at the Grenada General Hospital. Through US-based technology manufacturer Masimo Corporation, the St. George’s University Advisory Board for Sickle Cell Association of Grenada (SCAG) recently secured the donation of a hemoglobinometer – the first and only FDA-cleared technology that noninvasively and continuously measures hemoglobin without a painful needle stick and invasive blood draw.

“This Masimo unit is a noninvasive way of getting hemoglobin measurements on both pediatric and adult patients,” said Dr. Beverly Nelson, MD SGU ’86, Co-Chair of Pediatrics and Consultant Pediatrician for the Ministry of Health, Grenada. “It’s bright red and very easy to introduce to the child. You also get a measurement that will allow you to give an instant assessment and improve patient care with minimal deviations of accuracy from the normally dreaded finger prick.”

The Pronto device, which is useful for 8,000 measurements before needing to replace its probes, uses optical or light sensors to measure the total amount of hemoglobin in the body, avoiding the requirement of pricking the finger to get a blood sample for a lab test.

Housed in the Pediatric Ward of the General Hospital, the device will also be used by SGU students at health fairs, and for use on sickle cell patients at the monthly SCAG health clinic. Discovering the device is not currently validated for use on patients who suffer from sickle cell disease (SCD) only after it was secured, SGU’s advisory board now hopes to certify the Pronto, especially since one in 10 people in Grenada carry the sickle cell trait, according to SCAG.

Grenada also has an important place in the disease’s history, as the first recorded case was found in Dr. Walter Clement Noel, a Grenadian, in 1910.

“A main reason that we contacted Masimo was to support treatment of Grenadians who have SCD,” stated Dr. Andrew Sobering, Professor, Department of Biochemistry at SGU. “Validation will be done by comparing the measurement from the Pronto device to the standard lab test which involves a blood draw. This project is straightforward because there are enough people with SCD for us to create meaningful comparisons. This will be an important contribution to the international medical community as it will allow quick spot checks for hemoglobin to be done on SCD patients.”

The SGU Advisory Board for SCAG consists of founding members Drs. Felicia Ikolo, Chair and Liaison to SCAG; Mary Maj, Coordinator with Student Health Fairs; Tuula Jalonen, Researcher; and Dr. Sobering, who heads development and fundraising efforts. The team was also aided by SOM student Josh Whitesides, who wrote the initial draft proposal requesting the donation of the hemoglobinometer. By validating the Masimo device, the board strives to make a strong and valuable contribution to medical science while hopefully securing future donations of additional medical technology to the cause.

Masimo is a global medical technology company that develops and manufactures innovative noninvasive patient monitoring technologies, including medical devices and a wide array of sensors. A key medical technology innovator, Masimo is responsible for the invention of award-winning noninvasive technologies that are revolutionizing patient monitoring, including Masimo SET® pulse oximetry, Masimo Rainbow Pulse CO-Oximetry and new Masimo noninvasive and continuous total hemoglobin (SpHb™) monitoring technology.

Professor Ian McConnell Delivers Annual Keith B. Taylor Memorial/WINDREF Lecture at St. George’s University

Professor Ian McConnell, most recognized for his fundamental discoveries on the immune system, drew upon his distinguished career in research while delivering the Keith B. Taylor Memorial/WINDREF Lecture at Bourne Hall on November 8. His address, titled “One Health: Successes and Opportunities,” focused on the immunology of infectious diseases of both animals and man, and was delivered to an audience of more than 1,100 faculty, staff, community members, and online viewers.

ian-mcconnell-lecture

Dr. McConnell is an Emeritus Professor of Veterinary Science and Director of Research at the University of Cambridge, England. One Health has been a theme of his extensive research and teaching, with particular emphasis on zoonotic diseases and genetic diseases of animals that have parallels with genetic diseases in man. In particular, his work is currently focused on the scientific basis of infectious diseases of animals and man and how they impact public health at a global level.

“One Health is a concept that has had a long history in both medical and veterinary science,” said Dr. McConnell. “It is an important and defining concept which recognizes the interconnectedness between medicine, veterinary medicine, epidemiology, and the biomedical and biological sciences. Public health, environmental health, and biodiversity all play in to the issues and concerns affecting the health of animals and man.”

ian-mcconnell-lectureAlthough One Health is a broad subject that covers many areas in veterinary medicine, human medicine, and biological sciences, Dr. McConnell chose to focus his lecture on two areas: global infectious diseases and comparative medicine. He used the examples of the eradication of rinderpest and rabies in animals in Europe to illustrate the successes and opportunities for One Health in global infectious diseases. For comparative medicine, he discussed the opportunities for translational research in man based on the repair of spinal cord injuries in dogs.

In addition to his professorship, Dr. McConnell is a Founder Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, the UKs foremost Academy of medical science. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE), and was elected to Fellowships of the Royal Society of Medicine, and Royal College of Pathologists’ on scientific merit. He is a Professorial Fellow in Veterinary Science of Darwin College Cambridge.

After he graduated in veterinary medicine from the University of Glasgow and in Natural Sciences (Pathology) from the University of Cambridge, he carried out his doctoral studies (PhD) in immunology in the laboratory of Professor Robin Coombs, one of the founding fathers of immunology, in the Department of Pathology at Cambridge. Professor McConnell also gave the 13th Annual Geoffrey H. Bourne Memorial Lecture at St. George’s University in 2007.

The Annual WINDREF and Keith B. Taylor Memorial Lecture, named after SGU’s second Vice Chancellor, has drawn the attention of numerous renowned presenters willing to share their expertise on topics such as climate change, health needs, and drug abuse and addictions. Past speakers at the lecture have included Dr. Robert C. Gallo, Director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, best known for his role in the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and Dr. Valentin Fuster, a renowned cardiologist who presented on the topic, “The Worldwide Challenge of Cardiovascular Disease.”

Published on 11/15/16

WINDREF Receives $380,000 in Grants to Study Vector-Borne Diseases

The Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF) has received two grants, valued at $380,000, to study the prevalence and impact of the Zika and Chikungunya viruses in Grenada and surrounding countries.

windref

A two-year, $300,000 USD grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) – Fogarty International Center will allow researchers to examine the neurodevelopmental impact of the chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in infants in Grenada. In addition, WINDREF, which is based on the St. George’s University campus, has been granted $80,000 USD by the United States Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) to study the Zika virus in the Southern Caribbean.

Dr. Randall Waechter, Research Grants Coordinator and faculty member in St. George’s University’s Department of Bioethics, and Dr. Angelle Desiree LaBeaud, Associate Professor at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, will serve as Co-Principal Investigators for the NIH study, which is titled “Neurodevelopment and Vector-borne Diseases: Building Research Capacity in the Tropics.” They will be assisted by SGU faculty members Barbara Landon and Trevor Noel and also work in conjunction with researchers from Stanford University, Oxford University, and Université de La Réunion.

“The recent discovery of the potential impact of the Zika virus on neurodevelopment in utero has researchers all over the world wondering if other vector-borne viruses can also impact neurodevelopment. We have put together a global team of leading experts to address this question. We are very excited to carry out this study, get SGU students involved, and build further research capacity in Grenada”

CHIKV’s spread through the Caribbean beginning in December 2013, including Grenada from August to December 2014, was followed by the recent emergence of the Zika virus in the region, highlighting the need to investigate, predict, contain and respond to vector-borne diseases. Through the NIH study, researchers will determine the prevalence of mother-to-child transmission of CHIKV in Grenadian pregnant mothers, compare the neurodevelopment of children born to infected mothers versus unexposed children, assess the burden of confounding factors to better understand the specific impact of VBD on neurodevelopment, and build local capacity for arboviral and neurodevelopmental testing at SGU.

Past WINDREF research endeavors have been supported by the NIH, including a $50,000 grant through the NIH and the Caribbean Public Health Association (CARPHA) to research the efficacy and awareness of breast and cervical screening in the region earlier this year. However, the CHIKV study marks the first time that the NIH has directly funded a WINDREF research project. It comes on the heels of another neurodevelopmental study, funded by Grand Challenges Canada, for which WINDREF examined the connection between corporal punishment and cognitive outcomes. Through this previous grant, the capacity to examine neurodevelopment in association with CHIKV has already been established.

“In the recent UNESCO Science Report titled: ‘Toward 2030’,  the remarkable increase in research output from Grenada over the last decade – largely as a result of St. George’s University – was acknowledged,” Dr. Waechter said. “Grenada is now the number three producer in the Caribbean of the most internationally respected publications, behind Jamaica and Trinidad. SGU has a promising future as an international research center and we are excited by the opportunities this offers to Grenadians and other CARICOM citizens.”

Titled “Zika virus surveillance in the Southern Caribbean and Reference Lab Support,” the NMRC study will be led by Dr. Calum Macpherson, Director of Research at SGU, Todd Myers from the NMRC, and William Nelson, the President and Chief Executive Officer of Tetracore. Zika dominated headlines around the world in the spring and summer of 2016 and Grenada was among more than 55 countries whose residents were afflicted with the virus.

The study is only the latest partnership between SGU and Tetracore. In July, the Maryland-based biotechnology company donated a Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction thermocycler device to assist with the diagnostics and surveillance for Zika and other vector-borne infections in Grenada. The device can identify multiple genetic markers for Zika and can process six samples simultaneously.

“This collaboration between WINDREF, the Ministry of Health, Grenada, and the US NIDDL and Tetracore provides an essential diagnostic service, using the latest technology for the diagnosis of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue,” said Dr. Macpherson. “This information is important for many at-risk sectors of the population.”

 

Published on 10/5/16

Thermocycler Device Allows SGU and WINDREF to Administer Zika Testing in Grenada

St. George’s University and Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF), in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, have partnered with Tetracore to build capacity towards diagnostics and surveillance for Zika virus and other vector-borne infections in Grenada.

thermocycler device team

On May 9, Dr. William Nelson, President and CEO of Tetracore, donated a Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) thermocycler device, the Illuminex, in response to WINDREF’s expressed need not only for improved capabilities for diagnostics and clinical management but also for outbreak investigation and research of Zika virus, as well as Chikungunya and Dengue viruses, which also affect the island.

While in Grenada, Dr. Nelson met with healthcare staff at the General Hospital, the Ministry of Health, faculty and researchers at SGU and WINDREF, and other health centers to provide training on the use of Illuminex and to assess some of the suspected cases of Zika virus found on island.

“The Illuminex device is very efficient in terms of its diagnostic capabilities, which circumvents the need for Grenada to access regional and international laboratory capacity,” said Dr. Satesh Bidaisee, Chair of the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at SGU. “Now we have the opportunity here at SGU and WINDREF to effectively and efficiently have a very short turn around time for diagnosis and clinical intervention in Grenada.”

The RT-PCR technology identifies multiple genetic markers for Zika, which allows for the testing to be highly specific and of applicable diagnostic potential. Illuminex is capable of processing six samples simultaneously, including blood as well as urine, which is less invasive and easier for clinical management. Through the use of a battery/chargeable power source, the device is portable and has been able to be tested across the government diagnostic laboratories and community health centers.

With Zika already present in the western hemisphere, including the surrounding Caribbean islands and Grenada, the imminent rainy season results in increased ground water collection, and in turn, more opportunities for mosquitoes to breed. The rise in population of the vector can lead to a heightened mode of transmission and ultimately an increase in the number of cases of Zika.

“The extent of the number of persons infected with Zika virus will be determined by the public health approaches that have been implemented,” explained Dr. Bidaisee. “In terms of education, source reduction, and vector control, these measures have already been put in place and can possibly have a reduced burden towards any outbreak, as opposed to Chikungunya which had an exponential effect on the population.”

“Zika presents one of the most challenging threats of the emerging arboviruses in the tropics. In partnership with the Ministry of Health and now Tetracore, we hope to mitigate its impact in Grenada,” said Dr. Calum Macpherson, Director of Research, St. George’s University. “Having this Illuminex device provides all the parties involved with access to real-time data that will give insight to what’s working in terms of control and response to the threat posed by Zika virus to Grenada.”

About Tetracore

Tetracore is a biotechnology research and development organization that develops highly innovative diagnostic reagents and assays for infectious diseases and biological warfare (BW) threat agents. Tetracore offers a broad range of highly-specific, rapid, antibody-based test kits and antibody reagents for the detection of BW infectious agents and toxins, including the first FDA cleared test kit for identification of B. anthracis from colonies. The four founding scientists, Gary Long, Ph. D., Beverly L. Mangold, Ph.D.*, Thomas W. O’Brien, Ph.D., and William M. Nelson, M.D. (CDR, US Navy Ret.), have been leaders in the development of state-of-the-art diagnostic technology for use by the Joint Program Office for Bio-defense (JPO), the Department of Defense (DOD), FBI, and DOE.

Published on 8/5/16

St. George’s University Hosts 48Th Ten-Day International Teaching Seminar on Cardiovascular Disease

The International Society of Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention (ISCEP) partnered with St. George’s University for the second time in five years to host the 48th Ten-Day International Teaching Seminar on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention in Grenada.

48th ten day international teaching seminar on cardiovascular disease

Thirty-six fellows from 26 countries participated in the International Teaching Seminar geared at providing formal training in this area for interested and qualified health professionals, through a program described as “specialty bridging” between epidemiology and cardiology.

Professor Neil Poulter, Chair of Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at Imperial College, London, UK, and a Board of Trustees Member of WINDREF, co-directed the Teaching Seminar. Dr. Poulter has been involved with the ISCEP for almost 30 years; he participated as a fellow himself in 1980 and later started teaching at the Seminar in 1986.

“It is a very prestigious course to get involved with,” said Professor Poulter. “There’s a huge need and a fantastic opportunity that St. George’s University has given us to come back here for a second time. Grenada is a marvelous place to be; it’s a fabulous environment and relatively central for this region. We are extremely grateful to SGU for this superb opportunity.”

With the awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD) as a global health problem growing, Drs. Ancel Keys and Jeremiah Stamler of the International Society of Cardiology (ISC) spearheaded the first ISCEP edition, in Makarska, Yugoslavia, in 1968. The ISC recognized a serious practical limitation of its field, namely a lack of trained and experienced scientists and practitioners to address the worldwide need for effective work in epidemiology and prevention of CVD.

Almost 50 years later, the Seminars have since trained nearly 2,000 health professionals from 100 countries, in all continents except Antarctica, with last year’s Seminar being held in Denaru, Nadi, Fiji. The success of the International Seminars has stimulated national and regional Seminars, in countries such as Japan, Mexico, and Spain, where Alumni Fellows have set up local seminars to be taught in their native languages, thus further disseminating the training and education to conduct research and practice in this field.

Over the years, the International Seminars have equipped some of the world’s most prominent leaders in preventive cardiology, many of whom have either taken the Seminar, taught it, or are still teaching it. Today, these fellows are responsible for not only many of the landmark research studies into prevention but also in terms of policy and prevention in governments worldwide. Distinguished alumni include ministers of health from Pakistan and most recently from India, Dr. K. Srinath Reddy, Past President of the World Heart Federation.

According to Dr. Kay-Tee Khaw, Professor of Clinical Gerontology at the University of Cambridge, UK, and Seminar coordinator for the ISCEP, Grenada and other countries in the Caribbean are observing a great rise in diabetes, obesity, and cases of high blood pressure. “Our aim is to both raise awareness of the issue and also increase capacity in terms of people who are able to address this issue,” explained Dr. Khaw.

“Having been to Grenada five years ago, several past fellows have been instrumental in developing many of the surveillance studies on risk factors and improving health policy in the region,” added Dr. Khaw. “Grenada has many positive examples of control of risk factors and has many advantages in being able to be a model for how we can improve prevention of CVD in both the region and the rest of the developing world. We are very grateful to Dr. Calum Macpherson, Vice Provost of the International Program Development at SGU, for graciously hosting the Seminar here.”

The International Seminars remain an essential training resource for cardiovascular epidemiology and prevention and a model for complementary programs needed to meet the growing demands for skilled health professionals in this field throughout the world. The Ten-Day International Teaching Seminars on Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Prevention offer a well-tested and very successful model for introducing young specialists in cardiology and related disciplines to epidemiology and biostatistics as applied in research and practice in the prevention of CVD.

Published on 7/18/16

St. George’s University Mourns Loss of Lord Walton of Detchant

Lord Walton of Detchant

John Walton, Lord Walton of Detchant, sadly passed away on Thursday, 21st April, 2016 after a brilliant career during which he made enormous contributions to many fields in medicine. Lord Walton was born on 16th September, 1922. He graduated with a first class honors MBBS from Newcastle upon Tyne, then part of the University of Durham, England, in 1945. He spent two years in the British army, becoming second-in-command of a hospital ship which covered the final evacuation of Palestine in 1948. Lord Walton spent a year at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston with Raymond D. Adams from 1953 to 1954. He was appointed Professor of Neurology in Newcastle and Dean of Medicine (1971-1981). From 1983-1989, he was head of Green College, Oxford. Lord Walton obtained his MD in 1952, FRCP in 1960, DSc in 1973, and founding fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 1998. He served as president for many organizations including the British Medical Association (1980-1982), the General Medical Council (1982-1989), the Royal Society of Medicine (1984-1986), the Association of British Neurologists (1986-1987), and the World Federation of Neurologists (1989-1997). He was knighted in 1978 and became a cross bench life peer in the House of Lords in 1989. Lord Walton has honorary degrees from seven British universities and from universities in France, Italy, and Thailand, and is an honorary member of 21 national neurological associations.

Lord Walton served as a first president of WINDREF (UK) from 1999-2002. He made many visits to Grenada and gave the WINDREF lecture titled “A doctor in the house” in 2002. For his contributions he also was awarded the Mike Fisher Memorial award in 2010. He loved his local football team, Newcastle United, and he thoroughly enjoyed playing golf with a tremendously competitive spirit, a quality he brought to everything he put his hand to. Lord Walton’s clear thinking, brilliant mind, and incisive but fair decisions were much appreciated and will be greatly missed by everyone.

Published on 4/29/16