St. George’s University’s School of Medicine Introduces College System

St. George’s University has entered a new era of medical education with a radical restructuring of the incoming classes in the Doctor of Medicine program.

Set to launch this fall, all incoming students will belong to one of nine Colleges set up to frame a learning community system with student wellness, interaction, and support at the center of the curriculum and student experience at SGU.

The mission of the system is to create a diverse collegiate environment in which students are comprehensively supported to develop and demonstrate the skills, knowledge, compassion, tolerance, commitment, and personal integrity required to be a practicing physician.

“I’m enthused about the foundation for success that this new system will create for our students,” said Charles R. Modica, Chancellor of St. George’s University. “Since we opened our doors more than 40 years ago, the University has always placed great pride on student success and the support they receive from faculty and their peers, and the new College structure will strengthen them both.”

Each College represents an academic family that supports the wellness of students and fosters the academic, personal, and professional development of its membership. Each will have its own director and associate director, as well as dedicated personnel for student support, including academic advisors, faculty, learning strategists, advisors, and other support staff.

The Colleges will also provide a sense of community, with each College having a dedicated master schedule of classes, and all small group work will be centered around the Colleges. College and intercollegiate social events and competitions will also take place throughout the year.

“The new College system will enhance the student experience here at SGU, not only in lectures and labs but as students live, work, and interact with each other, both on and off campus,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU. “We truly believe that it provides our students with the best chance to be successful in their studies and as they pursue their dream of becoming a physician.”

In addition, St. George’s University will also integrate a wellness program for students in their first term, featuring seven classes that cover such topics as lifestyle medicine, diet and nutrition, and test-taking strategies.

The nine Colleges were named after some of the most influential physicians and scientists in history, including:

  • Blackwell: Elizabeth Blackwell was a British physician who became the first woman to receive a Doctor of Medicine in the United States.
  • Curie: Marie Curie was a Polish physicist and chemist who pioneered research on radioactivity, and the only person to win Nobel Prizes in two different sciences.
  • Fleming: Alexander Fleming was a Scottish physician-scientist best known for his discovery of  antibiotics.
  • Galen: A Greek physician and philosopher whose medical research influenced and developed the fields of anatomy, pathology, pharmacology, and more.
  • Hippocrates: The Greek physician who is commonly regarded as the Father of Medicine.
  • McIndoe: Archibald McIndoe was a New Zealand-born surgeon whose tactics to treat burns during World War II revolutionized plastic surgery.
  • Metrodora: Greek physician who wrote one the oldest surviving medical text written by a woman and who was one of the first to suggest surgical treatment for both breast and uterine cancer.
  • Peabody: Francis Peabody was an American turn of the 20th century physician famous for his dedication to compassionate patient care, as well as his work on typhoid and polio.
  • Taylor: Keith B. Taylor was SGU’s second Vice Chancellor and one of the most cited gastroenterologists of his time. This College is reserved for students who enter SGU through the Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program.

Health Education England and St. George’s University Reach Agreement on New Program to Fill Postgraduate Medical Training Programs in England

Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University (left), and Professor Ian Cumming, Chief Executive of Health Education England, sign a Memorandum of Understanding that will allow SGU graduates to undertake postgraduate training in England through the NHS’ Widening Access to Specialty Training program.

At a ceremony in Grenada, leaders of Health Education England (HEE), part of the National Health Service (NHS), and St. George’s University signed a Memorandum of Understanding to enable SGU School of Medicine graduates to undertake postgraduate training in England, with the first intake expected in the autumn of 2018. SGU School of Medicine is the only Caribbean medical school in a direct agreement with Health Education England for the first 18-month program to provide graduates for postgraduate training. The agreement is expected to facilitate 50-100 trainees annually from SGU School of Medicine entering the NHS in England.

This agreement establishes a pathway for a significant number of SGU School of Medicine graduates to join the Widening Access to Specialty Training (WAST) Program, an initiative within NHS that recruits overseas postgraduate doctors, with a focus on ensuring they are able to enter general practice and psychiatry training programs, the expansion of both specialties being a key priority for the NHS. Sixteen SGU graduates will begin WAST in the next seven months, with many more in the application process.

Graduates will undertake one or two postgraduate foundation years, depending on prior experience, followed by entry into specialty training. This postgraduate training is recognized for licensure and given credit in the UK, the European Union, and Commonwealth countries.

“Our role is to ensure the health workforce in England can meet the challenges faced by the NHS, which includes the provision of services in underserved areas,” said Professor Ian Cumming, Chief Executive of Health Education England. “We are very impressed that graduates provided by SGU are of the high standard demanded by the NHS; I look forward to the first intake arriving in 2018.”

St. George’s University has graduated more than 16,000 physicians who have gone on to practice medicine throughout the world.

HEE Director of Global Engagement Ged Byrne added, “St. George’s students are well qualified and talented. We anticipate they will have great success in our postgraduate training programs and in practice in the UK afterwards.”

“This agreement highlights the increasingly important role played by SGU as an international institution in global health care,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU. “Our extensive network of partner universities and teaching hospitals around the world, including in England, ensures our students receive a comprehensive education in a range of clinical environments. This is reflected in the fact that we are the only Caribbean medical school to enter into an agreement with HEE, enabling our graduates to apply for the WAST program. England has one of the most stringent regulatory frameworks in the world, and that our graduates now have this opportunity is reflective of their caliber. We are delighted that this major development has taken place in the 70th anniversary year of the NHS.”

With intakes in February and August each year, most successful applicants will join a one-year postgraduate foundation clinical course in England, where they will improve the skills and competencies required for admission to specialty training. The program will typically consist of six months of psychiatry training followed by six months in an acute hospital setting. Upon completing the program, graduates will be eligible to apply for an Alternative Certificate of Foundation Competencies, after which they can apply for a three-year program of specialty training in England.

Commenting on the importance of the agreement for SGU in the UK, Rodney Croft, Dean of Clinical Studies, UK, said, “I am delighted that St. George’s medical graduates, some of whom have received clinical training in our 17 NHS affiliated hospitals in England, will now have the opportunity to return to England to practice—thereby helping to offset the numerical and specialty shortage of doctors we are presently experiencing.”

The location of training for those on the WAST program will be assigned by HEE, with most programs focusing on areas of acute shortage, predominantly in the Midlands, East, North and South West of England, Yorkshire, and the Humber. Successful applicants will be offered their highest available location preference.

“One of our central aims is to find ways to train doctors in the areas they are needed most,” said Dr. Olds. “The global shortage of medical professionals is exacerbated by maldistribution, both by geography and specialty. This agreement, which will encourage our graduates to train in family medicine and psychiatry in areas of England with the greatest need, is one example of how we are making a significant positive impact around the world.”

St. George’s University and Mahidol University Further Partnership With Joint Doctor of Medicine Pathway Program

From left to right, Mr. Phee Na Lamphun, Student Recruitment Manager for Thailand, St. George University; Dr. G. Richard Olds SGU President; Dr. Sarayut Nathaphan, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research, MUIC, Mahidol University; and Mr. Pete Fiaschi, Director of International Recruitment for Asia, St. George’s University

St. George’s University has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Mahidol University International College (MUIC), Thailand, establishing a new medical foundation year at MUIC which is equivalent to the first year of the 5-year MD program taught at SGU in Grenada. Mahidol students who successfully complete this premedical year of study will be eligible to enroll in SGU’s MD degree program.

SGU has committed to award five partial-tuition scholarships per year, over a five-year period, to Mahidol students for admission onto SGU’s MD degree program.

The deal further strengthens the relationship between SGU and Mahidol University International College, following an earlier agreement in 2014 that launched a dual BS/MD degree between the two institutions.

“This Memorandum of Understanding builds on an already fruitful relationship with Mahidol University International College,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “We know from experience that their students are dedicated and talented, and find studying at SGU an enriching experience. I am delighted that we have opened a new pathway for students to join our world-leading MD degree program, many of whom will do so with tuition scholarships.”

Dr. Phitaya Charupoonphol, Dean of Mahidol University International College, said: “Four years after the signing of our first agreement, our partnership with SGU continues to go from strength to strength. In choosing to offer scholarships to our students, the quality of our teaching has been recognized by one of the world’s leading international medical education. We look forward to many years of close collaboration”.

“We are excited about this opportunity where students in Asia can now begin their studies at a world class university with a pathway to an MD degree at SGU,” added Dr. Calum Macpherson, Vice Provost for International Program Development and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. “In addition to a world class medical education, the clinical training opportunities available in the United States and UK provide SGU students with valuable exposure to a variety of healthcare systems.”

Pete Fiaschi, Director of Recruitment Asia, commented, “This is an extremely exciting 1+4 partnership which will enable Asia-based students to study the first year of a five-year MD program at a world-class University in Asia. We are delighted to offer this to students in Asia who would prefer a localized program in Thailand before embarking on their future in Grenada and then the US and UK for clinical training.”

St. George’s University Signs Agreement with Government of Fujairah, United Arab Emirates

St. George’s University has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Government of Fujairah, United Arab Emirates. The MOU “recognizes the benefits of mutual cooperation, and both institutions will now explore potential educational collaboration in medical related studies.” As part of the agreement, SGU will be listed on the Government of Fujairah’s website as a recognized education provider, meaning that SGU can now accept students from the Emirate of Fujairah.

The agreement, which is now in effect, expresses the commitment of both parties to increase access for the Government of Fujairah’s students to a US postsecondary education through SGU. The MOU further strengthens SGU’s relationship with the UAE, following last year’s announcement that the Ministry of Education had recognized the university’s MD degree program.

“I am pleased that students in Fujairah will now have the option of studying at St. George’s University in Grenada where they will receive a top international medical education,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU.  “The University will also benefit, increasing the diversity and breadth of experience of our student body.”

Adding his remarks, Mohamed Khalifa Alzyoudi, Employee Affairs Director, Government of Fujairah, said: “SGU is a world-leading institution, and I am very happy that our students will now have the opportunity to study medicine at their campus in Grenada. This MOU marks the beginning of a fruitful relationship, and I look forward to working with SGU to further our collaboration in the near future.”

St. George’s University’s School of Medicine draws students and faculty from 140 countries. Key to its success has been developing enthusiasm in students to practice medicine in their home countries, often in areas where physician numbers are low. Approximately 1 percent of all practicing doctors in the United States are graduates of St. George’s University, with that figure rising to around 15 percent of the physician population in Trinidad and Tobago, and 20 percent in Botswana.

Newest Class of Physicians Reflects on the Past, Looks Ahead to the Future

 

Before setting off for residency, St. George’s University School of Medicine’s newest class of physicians gathered at New York City’s Lincoln Center once more to celebrate the completion of one journey, and the beginning of another.

The newest class of physicians came from 44 US states, six Canadian provinces, and 51 countries from around the world. They join a network of more than 16,000 physicians who have earned their Doctor of Medicine degrees from SGU since the University opened in 1977.

“You’ve made sacrifices and you’ve persevered, and for that I have the utmost respect for each and every one of you,” said St. George’s University Chancellor Charles Modica. “I hope you know how proud you’ve made all of us, and how proud you’ve made your parents and friends. The world is full of all sorts of problems, and you’re the solution. You’re going to do well. I know that because  of your predecessors. You’ve earned this, you deserve this, and we love you for it.”

Graduates gathered at David Geffen Hall on June 9 and 10 for the commencement festivities, enjoying each other’s company two years after they departed Grenada for their clinical rotations.

“Going to SGU was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made,” added James Velasquez, MD SGU ’18, who will start his emergency medicine residency at Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in Brooklyn, NY. “I received a great education, I loved the island, and because it taught me how to buckle down and study right, it got me ready for the next part of my career.”

All together, St. George’s University graduates will begin their postgraduate residencies in 43 US states, four Canadian provinces, as well as Trinidad and Tobago, and the United Kingdom next month.

Colleen Murphy, MD SGU ’18, will join Yale New Haven Health’s obstetrics and gynecology residency program at Bridgeport Hospital this summer. She chose OB/GYN because of how it combines surgery with continuity of care.

“It’s nice to celebrate with everyone else who was there along the way,” she said. “We all did it together, so it’s nice to end the journey together.”

Joining her on the journey was Philip Lettieri, MD SGU ’18, who not only gained an education at SGU but he also met his wife, classmate Jessica Lettieri, MD SGU ’18, during their first year of the Foundation to Medicine program. Married this past April, the couple is now off to New Jersey for residency, with Philip obtaining a categorical surgery residency at St. Barnabas Medical Center, and Jessica matching into a pediatrics position at Atlantic Health.

“Growing up on Long Island and coming from college in the Midwest, I didn’t know what to expect coming down to Grenada,” Philip Lettieri said. “There were definitely some times where it was tough, but looking back, I wouldn’t change anything at all.”

Jessica Lettieri appreciated all the opportunities available to her during her time as a student, including volunteering around the island, participating in the popular Prague selective, and completing clinical rotations in the same hospital where her grandmother worked over 50 years ago.

“I wouldn’t have it any other way,” she said. “It’s great to see people today that we started first term with, many of whom we haven’t seen in two years because they were on the other side of the country for clinicals. Today has been a great experience because we all did it together.”

In addition to the accolades showered in the 2018 class of graduates, the University also acknowledged the contributions of one of its longtime administrators and faculty members. Dr. Ted Hollis, who served as Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences from 2000 to 2017, was bestowed the Distinguished Service Medal. Dr. Hollis came to St. George’s University in 1978 as a visiting professor before joining the faculty full-time as a professor in 1994.

“Dr. Hollis is responsible for enriching the learning environment of thousands of undergraduate students across the Caribbean and the Commonwealth countries,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU.

The University also presented Bruce Hebets, CEO of Borrego Health, with an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters. Mr. Hebets took charge of a single, small Federally Qualified Health Center in Southern California and over the next 15 years built it into the fifth largest FQHC system in America, caring for nearly 500,000 residents of inland Southern California.

– Brett Mauser

St. George’s University Hosts First International Meeting of NIH Fogarty Program Administrators

This week, St. George’s University will host a conference for the National Institutes of Health’s Fogarty International Center grant administrators—the first ever outside the United States.

“We’re thrilled to host this year’s Fogarty International Center administrators meeting,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “This meeting is an opportunity for the world’s leading minds to collaborate and continue their efforts to produce revolutionary research on global health. It’s an honor for St. George’s to facilitate that work.”

Attendees will hear from a number of Fogarty grantees and will discuss a number of global public health initiatives.

Several St. George’s faculty members have received funding from the Fogarty International Center. Among them is Dr. Randall Waechter, Assistant Dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Associate Director of Research at SGU. He’s also Grants Administrator of the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation.

In 2016, Dr. Waechter and Dr. Angelle Desiree LaBeaud of Stanford received a grant to investigate the threat of Chikungunya, a mosquito-borne viral disease, on children born during the outbreak in Grenada in 2014. Their work focused on how this disease may affect neurodevelopment in infants exposed to Chikungunya in tropical regions.

In 2014, St. George’s University Professor Cheryl Macpherson partnered with Fogarty grantee Sean Philpott of Union Graduate College (now merged with Clarkson University) on the “Caribbean Research Ethics Education Initiative”—a suite of graduate-level online and onsite bioethics courses for middle and low-income students across the Caribbean.

“At St. George’s University, we share the Fogarty International Center’s commitment to carrying out research that improves the lives of people worldwide while building research capacity in low- and middle-income countries,” said Dr. Waechter, the lead organizer of this year’s Fogarty administrators meeting. “We’re honored to welcome the Fogarty administrators to Grenada and to help advance the Center’s important work.”

AMSA SGU Donates EC$15,000 to Grenada Heart Foundation

St. George’s University’s chapter of the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) recently presented a donation of EC$15,000 to the Grenada Heart Foundation (GHF)—the latest in a decades-long partnership to help provide lifesaving interventional cardiac procedures to the most vulnerable.

Funds were raised at this year’s Valentine’s Day Date Auction, the group’s biggest and most popular fundraising event of the year. Featuring donations from local businesses and paired with students showcasing various talents, prizes including restaurant vouchers, two-night hotel stays, and a catamaran cruise were auctioned off as “dates” for potential bidders.

The evening included a fire-breather, a belly dancer, and several musicians and dancers.

“The fundraiser turned out to be really amazing. We raised more than we even expected,” said Sravan Vemuri, President of AMSA SGU. “The event was very well attended and full of excitement, with our wonderful and talented students giving their best to help fundraise for such a worthy cause..”

In the last five years alone, AMSA SGU has donated more than EC$100,000 to the GHF through a series of annual, student-organized, community-supported fundraising events. According to Devangi Dave, Secretary of AMSA SGU, its biggest draw, the Valentine’s Day Date Auction, has had “dates” go for four, five, or even 10 times their actual worth because of the audience’s willingness to support this worthwhile charity.

“The date auction is our best and biggest fundraiser,” added Ms. Dave, a fifth-term medical student. “It’s more of a way to engage the Grenadian community and get students excited about being a part of this very important cause, which is not only dear to us but also helps them get involved and give back to the people of the country that serves as their home away from home.”

The Grenada Heart Foundation was established in 1984 when St. George’s University was approached for assistance in obtaining heart surgery for a young Grenadian child. Since then, more than 300 children and young adults have received crucial cardiovascular care through direct funding and philanthropic partnerships.

Today, the GHF is administered by St. George’s University and is generously supported by corporate entities as well as civic and community organizations. All of its services are supported by donors, including the Government of Grenada, Rotary International, American Airlines, Caribbean Airlines, Virgin Atlantic, Children’s Health Organization Relief and Educational Services (CHORES), and a network of generous hospitals at which the patients are treated.

“On behalf of the board of directors of the Grenada Heart Foundation, I thank AMSA at SGU profusely for the generous donation, which directly goes toward providing quality cardiac care to needy children,” commented Dr. Kesava Mandalaneni, Chair, Grenada Heart Foundation. “It is because of such selfless efforts of various organizations that GHF can provide life-saving services to patients including covering travel expenses so that they can receive the best care and treatment options available irrespective of their economic situation.”

The American Medical Student Association (AMSA) is the oldest and largest independent association of physicians-in-training in the United States. Today, AMSA is a student-governed, national organization committed to representing the concerns of physicians-in-training. AMSA members are medical students, premedical students, interns, residents, and practicing physicians. Founded in 1950, AMSA continues its commitment to improving medical training and has more than 62,000 national and international members.

Global Scholars Study Rheumatic Effects of Living at Altitude in Tanzania

Three St. George’s University medical students, all alumni of the Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program (KBTGSP), recently took part in a research pilot project in Tanzania to test the effects of altitude on people living in different global regions.

Dr. Clive Kelly led the research and invited the alumni of the Northumbria-based program to join him in Tanzania after having taught them during their first year clinical selections in Newcastle. The KBTGSP provides students of St. George’s University on the Caribbean island of Grenada, to complete their first year of basic sciences at Northumbria as part of their medical degree.

Dr. Kelly, a Physician from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Gateshead and Senior Lecturer at Newcastle University, developed an interest in researching cases of arthritis in East Africa after traveling in the region last year. He has been involved in a pilot study to assess the range and extent of locomotor disease in the hopes it will give insight into regional variations in rheumatic conditions and treatments.

The students—Zoe McKinnell, Gillian Richmond, and Renee Wong—are now in the fourth year of their medical degrees at SGU. In addition to the research pilot project, they took on the additional challenge of spending a week climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, where they participated in a comparative study with Dr. Kelly on the effect of physiological adaptations to altitude in climbers from different parts of the world.

During their trip, the students also assisted Dr. Kelly’s teaching programme for junior medical students at a Tanzanian hospital and joined classes with more senior students to expand their knowledge from the perspective of different healthcare systems.

“It was great to have Zoe, Gillian, and Renee involved in this international research project, both for their own development and for the contribution they made in the field,” said Dr. Kelly. “From a teaching point of view, it was invaluable to have them there and their input was crucial. We were teaching a class of 40 students and they helped by taking smaller groups on to wards with me to talk to and examine patients and test techniques. I wouldn’t have been able to teach such large classes without their assistance.”

“The Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program was a great experience and the small group of 70 students meant we had a real community and support system,” said Ms. McKinnell. “It also gave me the opportunity to go to Tanzania, which turned out to be a big eye-opener. I was pleasantly surprised to be able to teach as well as learn while I was there.”

SGU student Gillian Richmond applied for the KBTGSP because she was interested in studying healthcare systems around the world.

“It was really interesting to go into a teaching hospital as an outsider and learn about healthcare in an international context,” Ms. Richmond said. “Joining SGU’s program at Northumbria University was the best decision I’ve made. I’ve made lifelong friends and my experience in Tanzania will be a helpful bridge to my teaching responsibilities as a resident next year.”

“I am grateful to Dr Kelly who helped us organize a teaching elective in Tanzania, where I was able to learn more than I could teach,” said Ms. Wong. “I was humbled every day by my patients, students, and colleagues.”

Building on this initial success, Dr. Kelly hopes to create an annual program for future students as the research project develops.

For the Love of Grenada: SGU Students Present EC$1 Million Donation of Medical Supplies from Project C.U.R.E.

St. George’s University students and administration hold a press conference with the Government of Grenada to announce the donation of EC$1 million worth of medical supplies from US-based healthcare non-profit Project C.U.R.E. The donation was spearheaded by medical students from the SGU Global Surgery Club and involved two years of preparation, fundraising, and logistics.

After two years of fundraising and preparation, students from St. George’s University Global Surgery Club recently presented a donation of medical supplies and equipment valued at EC$1 million to the Government of Grenada from US-based medical non-profit Project C.U.R.E. (Commission on Urgent Relief and Equipment).

“We are extremely grateful to have received this gift,” stated Pauline Peters, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Health, Grenada. “We all know the challenges that Grenada faces in regard to resources, so whatever partnership or collaboration we can foster with generous donors we’re more than willing to do so. This donation will go a long way in supporting the transformation of health care in Grenada by ensuring that all of our hospitals and health centers are fully equipped and stocked with the necessary medical supplies and equipment to provide essential health services.”

The 40-foot container packed with much needed healthcare provisions will be used to furnish a new operating room and intensive care unit at the Grenada General Hospital, as well disbursed to surrounding clinics. These vital supplies range from operating tables and orthopedic surgery packs to sutures, scalpels, and basic IV lines and fluids.

“The way in which this donation can affect people’s lives is almost without limits. After surveying some of the items donated, I can just imagine that thousands of Grenadian lives are going to be positively impacted by such a large contribution to our healthcare system,” commended Dr. George Mitchell, Chief Medical Officer, Ministry of Health, Grenada. “This donation will serve as a testament to just how much can be accomplished in the spirit of collaboration. I really want to thank SGU Global Surgery Club and I know that the ultimate beneficiary is going to be the people of Grenada.”

The brainchild of SGU Global Surgery Club Past President, Joshua Carlson, along with current President Amanda Hughes initiated contact with Project C.U.R.E. and were instrumental in leading the coordination efforts to make this donation possible. Working closely with the Ministry of Health, Medicine with a Mission, D’Amore Personal Injury Law LLC, and other SGU student organizations, the group was able to raise approximately US$20,000 toward covering the cost of shipment, logistics, and administrative expenses involved in bringing the container of supplies to Grenada.

“This project started with an email from Project C.U.R.E. asking us to meet the CEO, in order to provide medical and surgical supplies. More importantly, it stemmed from a desire to give back to a country that opened its doors to us, so we could attend a university that allowed us to achieve our dreams,” said Mr. Carlson. “This was a massive team effort and, along with the help of the amazing leadership of the SGU administration, we are honored to be able to give back to the people of Grenada in some tangible way. We just had the vision, but it was an incredible collaboration that made this donation a reality.”

“This all began with a single idea, but it was a team spirit that made it happen, with the public and private sectors and NGOs all working together,” commented Dr. C.V. Rao, Dean of Students, SGU. “Looking around at all of these boxes filled with medical supplies, I feel excited for the patients, Grenada’s citizens, and its visitors. This will have a definite impact, and all of that was possible because of our wonderful students. I am extremely proud of them.”

According to Dr. Rao, this is just the beginning. In two years, a study will examine how the supplies were utilized. He hopes that it will encourage other donors to give generously in the future.

“I’m thrilled about what’s happening,” Dr. Rao said. “It really will make a difference.”

SOM Alumni Association CME Examines the Art of Medicine

The science of medicine has produced miracles in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Yet, it is the art of medicine which remains the medium through which illness and suffering are relieved. This was the focus at this spring’s School of Medicine Alumni Association (SOMAA) continuing medical education conference in Grenada.

Titled “The Art of Medicine,” the four-day conference was held in association with the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). It featured prominent SOM alumni and faculty presenters who covered an array of topics such as new strategies and treatment for atrial fibrillation, the downside of mechanical ventilation, a discussion on high flow oxygen therapy, and how to use ultrasound to improve patient safety.

“Despite the enormous advances in the science of medicine, being a physician also entails the art of medicine—the interpersonal contact between patient and physician which remains a keystone of medical care,” said SOMAA President Bruce Bonanno, MD SGU ’83. “This conference provides not only education for physicians and other health care professionals but a way for our alumni to also get back to the beautiful island of Grenada to rekindle their love for the school, the people, and the island.”

For Jack Davidoff, MD SGU ’88, and his wife Tracey Davidoff neé Quail, MD SGU ’90, this was their second time returning to Grenada since earning their medical degrees at St. George’s University almost three decades ago. After attending last year’s CME held as part of SGU’s 40th anniversary celebrations, the couple was so impressed with the advances made at the University, they felt compelled to return again this year.

“Our first visit back last year was very emotional for us. It’s not just the school that gave us our start but it’s also the people that welcomed us to their island,” commented Dr. Jack Davidoff, an emergency medicine physician. “The True Blue campus is outstanding. Our three daughters are all in college and, of all the college campuses we’ve visited in the US, nothing compares to SGU.”

“With our second visit, we wanted to focus more on giving back in a teaching way,” said Dr. Tracey Davidoff, Vice President of the College of Urgent Care Medicine. “My husband has a vision of improving emergency medical services in Grenada and we wanted to make some connections on island and figure out the best way to do that.”

The 2nd annual SOMAA CME grew in participation since last year with more than 60 attendees, 50 of whom were SGU alumni, as well as 14 Grenadian physicians who practice locally. Additionally, their time in Grenada wasn’t only about lectures and education, the SOMAA provided plenty of opportunities to experience a taste of culture and hospitality on the island many called home during their studies. The group enjoyed a sightseeing tour of Grenada’s natural beauty; lunch at Belmont Estate, a fully functional and historic plantation; a shopping tour of Grenada’s capital, St. George’s; a Catamaran VIP day cruise including snorkeling and a visit to the Underwater Sculpture Park and Hog Island; and a closing sunset dinner at Louis and Marion Modica Hall.

“CME conferences present an opportunity for our graduates to come back to the island to reunite with classmates, friends, faculty and the community, and at the same time partake in a valuable and often needed continuing education component for their careers,” stated Brendon La Grenade, Vice Provost for Institutional Advancement, SGU. “CMEs are usually conducted in fun places, and SGU and Grenada offer exceptional facilities and a stellar location to achieve just that.”

– Ray-Donna Peters