Grenada Class of 2017 Encouraged to Climb From “Good to Great”

With an excellent education under their wings, sound advice to lean on and the world before them, greatness is within reach for the St. George’s University Class of 2017.

Such was explained by those who addressed the more than 300 graduates at this month’s commencement ceremony in Grenada, including an SGU alumnus who once stood in the graduates’ shoes. Joel Jack, BSc SGU ’03, an Assemblyman of the Tobago House of Assembly (THA) and the Keynote Speaker for the evening, implored his fellow alumni to find their passion, prepare for change, and embrace the future, citing Jim Collins’ inspirational book, “Good to Great.”

“When what you are deeply passionate about and what drives your economic engine come together, not only does your work move towards greatness but so too does your life,” said Mr. Jack, Deputy Chief Secretary and Secretary of Finance and the Economy of THA. “For in the end, it is impossible to have a great life unless it is a meaningful life.”

Blossom Philbert, 2017 SAS Valedictorian

Joining him in the family of SGU alumni were graduates representing 33 countries across the globe. The 2017 class included nearly 150 students from the School of Arts and Sciences and more than 120 from the School of Graduate Studies. In addition, medical doctorates were conferred on 65 Caribbean graduates, with one new Grenadian veterinarian in attendance. Ceremonies for the Schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine will take place in June at New York City’s Lincoln Center.

In her address to the crowd, valedictorian Blossom Philbert, BSc ’17, also quoted Collins, saying “greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, it turns out, is a matter of conscious choice.” She went on to compare life to that of a book, but unlike the chapters of their textbooks, they could not flip forward to see how many more pages were left.

“My next chapter might last four years, whereas the person sitting next to me might write six chapters in four years,” Ms. Philbert said. “It matters not as along as those chapters are representative of the journey that leads to a life full of greatness, which will ultimately give a pleasant read when we flip back through its pages.”

Among the degrees conferred by the School of Graduate Studies, Dr. Trevor Noel became the fifth student — and first Grenadian—to earn his Doctor of Philosophy at SGU. Dr. Noel was simultaneously inducted into the Gamma Kappa Chapter of the Delta Omega Public Health Honor Society for his extraordinary service to public health and invaluable contributions to the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF).

Dr. Rudi Webster

St. George’s University also recognized Dr. Rudi Webster with its Distinguished Service Award for his work spanning the fields of medicine, sports, diplomacy, and politics. Dr. Webster was instrumental in establishing the Shell Cricket Academy at SGU, where he served as Academy Director – an endeavor which signified that SGU was not just a medical school but much more. Several of SGU’s Shell Academy graduates went on to play for the West Indies cricket team, including Darren Sammy, who captained the team to two consecutive T20 World Cups.

“To this year’s graduates, all that you have achieved so far shows what you have learned and what you have done,” stated Dr. Webster. “However, it does not reflect what you can learn, and what you can become. That should be your focus now.”

“Many of us in the Caribbean believe that we are not good enough and that something is missing. This is incredible because the secret to our success already lies within us—it’s called self-acceptance. That was the secret of the West Indies Cricket team’s 15 years of success,” added Dr. Webster. “Self-acceptance is going to be the key to your success and it differs from self-confidence. Although your self-confidence may fluctuate depending on your success or failure, self-acceptance means you value yourself as a worthwhile human being regardless of if you succeed or you fail. We in the Caribbean are just as smart and have just as much talent as anyone else in the world, and I have proven that.”

St. George’s University Mourns Lord Soulsby of Swaffham Prior

Ernest Jackson Lawson Soulsby, Baron Soulsby of Swaffham Prior passed away on Monday at his home in Swaffham Prior. As the former President of the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation, former Chairman of the UK Board of Trustees for WINDREF, and a 20-year member of the Academic Board, he leaves behind a noteworthy legacy at St. George’s University. His remarkable career spanned five decades, during which he made significant contributions to veterinary and human medicine, global public health, parasitology, immunology, and zoonosis through his teaching, inspiring leadership, and scholarly contributions.

“Lord Soulsby’s contributions to WINDREF and St. George’s University leave an incredible legacy, but it is in his contributions to global health and education that his legacy will most endure,” said Calum Macpherson, Vice Provost for International Program Development, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, and Director of Research at St. George’s University, and Vice President and Director of WINDREF. “He will be missed by the many students and others who have met him as well as by the thousands who have relied upon his many publications, textbooks, and edited volumes in conducting their own research. His legacy in One Health One Medicine is indelible and his contributions will be missed.”

A distinguished microbiologist and parasitologist, and a leader in the US and UK worlds of veterinary medicine, Lord Soulsby was the first veterinary surgeon raised to the peerage in the United Kingdom.

He advised the UK government on animal welfare, science and technology, biotechnology, and environmental issues. He was President of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Royal Society of Medicine, the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee, the Royal Institute of Public Health, and the Royal Society for Public Health. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Biology, the Royal College of Pathologists, the Royal Society for Public Health, the Royal Society of Medicine, and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS).

His career included positions as Professor of Parasitology at the University of Pennsylvania and Professor of Animal Pathology at the University of Cambridge, where he was Dean for several years. Earlier, Lord Soulsby was in general veterinary practice in the north of England, a Veterinary Officer for the City of Edinburgh, and a lecturer in clinical parasitology at the University of Bristol. He was an Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge, and an Emeritus Professor of the University of Cambridge.

Lord Soulsby was also a Visiting Professor at various universities in Europe, the Far East, South America, and the United States. He is an honorary member of numerous international parasitology societies and has been awarded nine honorary degrees and several awards for his research. He published 14 books, as well as many articles in various veterinary and parasitological journals.

In 2015, the RCVS awarded him the Queen’s Medal, its highest award for services to veterinary medicine. His global experience provided an incredible resource for international agencies and he served as an advisor and consultant to World Health Organization, Food and Agriculture Organization, Pan American Health Organization, United Nations Development Program, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Department for International Development, and to numerous governments and universities.

Lord Soulsby is survived by his daughter, Katrina, and his granddaughter, Kananu. His service will be held at the Church of St. Mary, Swaffham Prior, at 2:00 pm local time on Wednesday, May 24. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Soulsby Foundation.

Helping Grenadians See Better: SGU’s Physician Humanitarian Network Aiding Disease-Related Blindness

When ophthalmologist Fred Lambrou first came to Grenada in 2014 to visit his stepson, Weston, a medical student at St. George’s University, the issues facing many Grenadians was plain to see. Diabetes, afflicting approximately 30 percent of the country’s population, threatened to slowly rob their eyesight unless they received proper treatment.

Having learned of this, Dr. Lambrou and his wife, Pat, an ophthalmology nurse, jumped at the opportunity to serve the country that provided their son’s medical education. Since their first visit, they have provided free weeklong ophthalmology clinics in Grenada twice each year through SGU’s Physician Humanitarian Network (SGU PHN), leaving their comfortable lives to provide more than 150 free laser treatments to those suffering from the blinding effects of diabetes.

“I feel very blessed to be working here in Grenada,” said Dr. Lambrou, Retina Surgeon at Retina Associates PA in Jacksonville, FL. “The people have been wonderful, and I think we are making a difference and progressing forward.  I keep coming back because of the need and the people. The SGU PHN has been fabulous, and I think together we can make a big difference in the lives of the people of Grenada. Our goal is to eliminate blindness from diabetic retinopathy in Grenada.”

“Dr. Lambrou represents the spirit of the SGU Physician Humanitarian Network,” said Brendon La Grenade, Interim Vice Provost, Office of Institutional Advancement at SGU. “We are grateful to have them as associate alumni, as well as their son, Weston. To sum them up in one word—humanitarians.”

To further bolster ophthalmologic treatment in Grenada, the Lambrous organized the donation of the OcuLight laser system by IRIDEX Corporation, a device that generally targets the damaged eye tissue by treating leaking blood vessels directly and or eliminating abnormal blood vessels that have formed. More recently, they secured an EasyScan retinal camera that will lead to earlier diagnoses of conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma.

“With the EasyScan camera, retinal screenings are very simple. They don’t hurt the patient, there is no need to dilate the pupils, and the camera takes a good picture that I can use for earlier diagnoses of retinal conditions,” Dr. Lambrou said. “Patients tend not to go see their eye doctor until they’ve lost their vision, and by then it’s almost too late. We strongly encourage people who are diabetic to get their eyes checked, and hope that, with this new equipment, we can get patients to come in earlier so we can treat them earlier and help prevent blindness.”

The EasyScan retinal imaging device was secured through HealPros, a mobile telemedicine service company that addresses unmet needs of diabetes management programs and diagnostic services. The camera employs Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) technology, which makes use of an infrared and a green laser that show multiple layers of the retina. When viewed individually and combined, different types of deviations can be identified, serving as a perfect basis for accurate diagnoses. With EasyScan’s high contrast images, retinopathies become more easily detectable leading to earlier diagnosis of retinal conditions.

All told, Mr. La Grenade estimated that Dr. Lambrou has sourced and donated equipment in excess of US $30,000 to provide corrective procedures to the people of Grenada.

“After screening 30-40 patients during his vacation on his very first visit to Grenada, Dr. Lambrou began strategizing on how he could lend his expertise to assist the patients he saw and to expand service to others,” Mr. La Grenade said. “It was immediately clear to him that, with the high prevalence of diabetes on the island, early detection and some treatment options would be necessary if these individuals were to keep their sight.”

Lending his almost 30 years of retina expertise, Dr. Lambrou also invites the University’s basic sciences students to the clinics giving them a chance to both observe and use the ophthalmoscope—gaining valuable hands-on experience and an early opportunity to build their clinical skills.

“I would love to expand the clinical aspect of my visits because the SGU PHN has provided a great resource for clinical material for students to learn,” praised Dr. Lambrou. “Medical education in the US is changing. It’s now important to get more clinical experience to students in the first two years of school. This is a great facility for students to get some much-needed practice dealing with patients and using the ophthalmoscope.”

St. George’s University Names CVS Health Executive Vice President Dr. Andrew Sussman as New CEO

GRENADA (May 3) — Today, St. George’s University named Andrew J. Sussman, MD, a physician with a long and distinguished career at some of the top hospitals, universities, and healthcare companies in the United States, as its new Chief Executive Officer.

“For 40 years, St. George’s University has transformed promising students into outstanding doctors committed to addressing the healthcare needs of people all over the world, especially those in underserved communities,” said Sussman. “I look forward to working with the entire St. George’s University team to continue to fulfill this important and inspiring mission.”

Sussman will lead all executive functions of the University, with a particular focus on expanding educational opportunities, programs, and support for students; forging clinical partnerships with hospital systems; and increasing the University’s reach internationally. Dr. G. Richard Olds will continue in his role as President of St. George’s University, and report to Dr. Sussman.

Sussman was most recently Executive Vice President of Clinical Services at CVS Health, the largest pharmacy care provider in the United States. Previously, he led the development and growth of CVS MinuteClinic, the largest walk-in clinic provider in the United States, with more than 1,100 locations. Under his leadership, CVS MinuteClinic established collaborative affiliations with more than 75 major hospital systems across the United States.

Before his career at CVS Health, Sussman was Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer at UMass Memorial Medical Center, the major teaching affiliate of UMass Medical School. He is an Associate Professor of Medicine at UMass Medical School.

Prior to his work at UMass, Sussman served as Chief Medical Officer of the Brigham and Women’s Physicians Organization, consisting of 800 teaching faculty at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He began his academic career at Harvard Medical School, first as Instructor and then as Assistant Professor of Medicine.

Sussman is a graduate of Harvard College, Harvard Medical School, and Boston University Questrom School of Business. He is a board-certified internist and primary care physician.

“We are thrilled to have Andy join St. George’s University as CEO,” said Charles Modica, the Founder and Chancellor of the University. “His record of leadership and achievement in health care is remarkable, and I know that he’ll position the University for sustained excellence over our next 40 years.”

Dr. G. Richard Olds, President and CEO of St. George’s University, Visits With BBC to Discuss Physician Maldistribution

Dr. G. Richard Olds, President and CEO of St. George’s University, appeared on the BBC to discuss how we can assist in reversing the medical brain drain from developing and middle-income countries. This is an important topic as physicians are already scarce worldwide and demand for foreign-born doctors is stretching resources in their home nations to a breaking point. What’s more, many of these people never return to work in their own communities.

Click on the Play button below to hear Dr. Olds outlining his ideas on how we can help mitigate the problem, or visit the World Service here.

 

St. George’s University Hires Leading Canadian Medical Education Official

File Photo: Ms. Banner, third from left, during an April 2013 visit to SGU’s True Blue Campus.

St. George’s University has hired Sandra Banner, the former director of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS), as its new consultant for University relations in Canada.

“I’m thrilled to join the St. George’s University team,” Ms. Banner said. “I look forward to expanding the St. George’s presence in Canada and strengthening our relationships with the Canadian medical community.”

As a consultant, Ms. Banner’s focus will be on expanding St. George’s University clinical programs in Canada, which currently include partnerships with the University of Saskatchewan and Vancouver General Hospital. She will also assist in recruiting Canadian students and shaping SGU’s message to Canadian audiences.

Ms. Banner comes to SGU after serving for 29 years as Executive Director and CEO of CaRMS, the national organization that matches students with residencies in Canada. During her tenure, CaRMS also grew from 1.5 full-time staffers to more than 40. The Service now serves over 7,000 applicants and 650 programs across Canada.

Ms. Banner brings a wealth of medical and educational experience to St. George’s University. She has served as a Board Director on the Physicians Credential Registry of Canada and is an Honorary Member of the College of Family Physicians in Canada. She has also presented to government committees on the state of medical education, including the Advisory Committee on Health Delivery and Human Resources, established by the Deputy Ministers of Health in Canada. Banner collaborated and contributed to the Future of Medical Education in Canada, a groundbreaking report aiming to reform the medical education system in order to better address the health needs of Canadians.

“St. George’s University is committed to training the physicians Canada needs to address its nationwide doctor shortage,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President, St. George’s University. “Sandra is the perfect person to lead our efforts in pursuit of that mission.”

SGU Graduate’s Work to Appear in New York City’s Museum of Modern Art

Before Joanne Caring, MD SGU ’86, began her career as an award-winning psychiatrist, she was an art student at Cornell University. Almost 40 years since changing career paths, her life will come full circle.

Dr. Caring has been friends with Louise Lawler, now an internationally renowned artist and photographer, since their undergraduate years in Ithaca. Together, they created artwork under the joint pseudonym, The Roseprint Detective Club, after college. Their joint effort from 1972, “Untitled,” is considered a seminal piece in Ms. Lawler’s career and will be on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City from April 30 to July 30 as part of “Why Pictures Now,” the first New York museum survey for Ms. Lawler.

Dr. Caring, a St. George’s University graduate who is now an Attending Psychiatrist at Metropolitan Hospital and an Assistant Professor at New York Medical College, will join Ms. Lawler at the exhibit’s opening on April 25.

“I knew that Louise was going to have the show at MoMA, but I didn’t know how far back they were going to go,” Dr. Caring said. “When I found out our piece was going to be included, it was very exciting. We did a lot of this kind of work together.”

“Untitled” is a 24-page book that features a series of sayings printed on slips of paper, similar to those found in fortune cookies. Examples include “’If you don’t listen’ said the sheriff, ‘I’ll fall’” and “New shoes, blue shoes, red and pink and blue shoes, tell me what would you choose, if you were to buy.” According to MoMA, the “sly, self-effacing, oddly humorous book of misdirection and nonspecific readings … cunningly embodies how an artist’s book can be a locus for engagement between artists and readers.”

The Roseprint Detective Club’s work has been displayed at art shows in New York City, Washington DC, and Pamplona, Spain. Although Dr. Caring no longer creates art herself, she looks back fondly on her time as an art student at Cornell, where she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts before going on to obtain her master’s degree from Hunter College. She taught art in college for three years before accepting a media fellowship at a psychiatric clinic, which ended up being her segue to a career in medicine. Following the fellowship, she created video content at a psychiatric hospital and became fascinated by the research that doctors were conducting, leading her to enter into the field herself. She applied to and enrolled at SGU in the fall of 1982.

Since graduating, Dr. Caring has enjoyed a three-decade-long career in psychiatry, arriving at Metropolitan Hospital as a resident in 1987 before accepting an attending position in 1991. She was Unit Chief of the Community Support Services Psychiatric Day Treatment Program for 26 years. She has also been a Guest Editor of Psychiatric Annals and is board certified in psychiatry. For her work, she has received the Behavioral Health Best Practices Award and Behavioral Health Recognition Award from NYC Health + Hospitals.

“I couldn’t have had this career without SGU,” said Dr. Caring, who is also a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

She looks forward to welcoming friends from all over the country to New York for the exhibit. Tickets to view “Why Pictures Now” and other exhibits can be purchased on the MoMA website.

Hemoglobinometer Donation Promises Patients Need No Longer Dread Finger Pricks

“No more tears” was the promise made to the patients of the Pediatric Ward at the Grenada General Hospital. Through US-based technology manufacturer Masimo Corporation, the St. George’s University Advisory Board for Sickle Cell Association of Grenada (SCAG) recently secured the donation of a hemoglobinometer – the first and only FDA-cleared technology that noninvasively and continuously measures hemoglobin without a painful needle stick and invasive blood draw.

“This Masimo unit is a noninvasive way of getting hemoglobin measurements on both pediatric and adult patients,” said Dr. Beverly Nelson, MD SGU ’86, Co-Chair of Pediatrics and Consultant Pediatrician for the Ministry of Health, Grenada. “It’s bright red and very easy to introduce to the child. You also get a measurement that will allow you to give an instant assessment and improve patient care with minimal deviations of accuracy from the normally dreaded finger prick.”

The Pronto device, which is useful for 8,000 measurements before needing to replace its probes, uses optical or light sensors to measure the total amount of hemoglobin in the body, avoiding the requirement of pricking the finger to get a blood sample for a lab test.

Housed in the Pediatric Ward of the General Hospital, the device will also be used by SGU students at health fairs, and for use on sickle cell patients at the monthly SCAG health clinic. Discovering the device is not currently validated for use on patients who suffer from sickle cell disease (SCD) only after it was secured, SGU’s advisory board now hopes to certify the Pronto, especially since one in 10 people in Grenada carry the sickle cell trait, according to SCAG.

Grenada also has an important place in the disease’s history, as the first recorded case was found in Dr. Walter Clement Noel, a Grenadian, in 1910.

“A main reason that we contacted Masimo was to support treatment of Grenadians who have SCD,” stated Dr. Andrew Sobering, Professor, Department of Biochemistry at SGU. “Validation will be done by comparing the measurement from the Pronto device to the standard lab test which involves a blood draw. This project is straightforward because there are enough people with SCD for us to create meaningful comparisons. This will be an important contribution to the international medical community as it will allow quick spot checks for hemoglobin to be done on SCD patients.”

The SGU Advisory Board for SCAG consists of founding members Drs. Felicia Ikolo, Chair and Liaison to SCAG; Mary Maj, Coordinator with Student Health Fairs; Tuula Jalonen, Researcher; and Dr. Sobering, who heads development and fundraising efforts. The team was also aided by SOM student Josh Whitesides, who wrote the initial draft proposal requesting the donation of the hemoglobinometer. By validating the Masimo device, the board strives to make a strong and valuable contribution to medical science while hopefully securing future donations of additional medical technology to the cause.

Masimo is a global medical technology company that develops and manufactures innovative noninvasive patient monitoring technologies, including medical devices and a wide array of sensors. A key medical technology innovator, Masimo is responsible for the invention of award-winning noninvasive technologies that are revolutionizing patient monitoring, including Masimo SET® pulse oximetry, Masimo Rainbow Pulse CO-Oximetry and new Masimo noninvasive and continuous total hemoglobin (SpHb™) monitoring technology.

Nearly $2 Million in Scholarships Awarded to St. George’s University Students From NYC

Today, St. George’s University announced that 15 students from New York City will receive $1.8 million in scholarships to pursue degrees in medicine at the school as part of the CityDoctors Scholarship Program.

“St. George’s University has long addressed the U.S. doctor shortage by producing highly qualified physicians who are committed to their community and the practice of medicine,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President, St. George’s University. “We are proud to offer these CityDoctors scholarships because it helps pave the way for these students to practice in areas that are near and dear to them, and areas that need such physicians the most.”

CityDoctors scholarship recipients on campus at St. George’s University.

St. George’s University established the CityDoctors Scholarship Program to help address the city’s shortage of primary care physicians and to enable promising students who otherwise might not be able to afford medical school to attend. Twelve of this year’s scholarship recipients received awards sponsored by NYC Health + Hospitals and commit to serving in the New York City public health system after completing their residency. The remaining three CityDoctors honorees received awards sponsored by Brooklyn Methodist Hospital as part of a similar partnership.

Students commit to one year of service with NYC Health + Hospitals for each year of scholarship aid they receive. Since its inception, the program has awarded $11 million to 112 students from metropolitan New York.

This year, CityDoctors scholarship recipients hail from Queens, Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Manhattan, as well as Florida and Pennsylvania. They’re selected based on their academic qualifications and financial need. Recipients receive either partial or full scholarships to pay for medical school for up to four years. Some scholarships are valued at more than $200,000.

“We are very proud of our ongoing partnership with St. George’s University, as it provides students with strong ties to the New York City area with an opportunity not only to continue their education, but to have job security following graduation,” said Machelle Allen, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, NYC Health + Hospitals. “The program also helps bring more primary care physicians into the workforce and into communities across the city, where they are so desperately needed.”

The 2017 CityDoctors scholarship recipients are:

Name

Residence

Hospital Award

Lance Wobus

Florida

NYC Health + Hospitals

Edward Lee

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Daniel Dever

Pennsylvania

NYC Health + Hospitals

David Michael

Brooklyn

NYC Health + Hospitals

Maggie Yeung

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Fateha Ahmed

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Taikchan Lidar

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Sadik Uddin

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Sneha Aidasani

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

GraceTackie

Bronx

NYC Health + Hospitals

Imran Baksh

Bronx

NYC Health + Hospitals

Tammy Jiang

Manhattan

NYC Health + Hospitals

Ashley Jack

Brooklyn

Brooklyn Methodist Hospital

Mena Awad

Brooklyn

Brooklyn Methodist Hospital

Paula Marie

Brooklyn

Brooklyn Methodist Hospital

St. George’s University Honors Clinical Studies Pioneer Morris Alpert

Back in its infancy, St. George’s University School of Medicine was guided forward by Dr. Morris Alpert, a hand surgeon and anatomist with a personality as unique as his expertise. The Founding Dean of Kingstown Medical College (KMC) in St. Vincent and a longtime member of the Board of Trustees for St. George’s University, Dr. Alpert built the foundation for SGU’s clinical studies program, creating a bridge between Grenada and the United States and the world that still exists today.

The University honored Dr. Alpert by unveiling a bronze plaque highlighting his accomplishments at a dedication ceremony on March 29 on the True Blue campus. Held outside Morris Alpert Hall, the ceremony was attended by University administrators, faculty, staff, and SOM alumni who knew and enjoyed the company of Dr. Alpert.

He came to SGU from Albany Medical College, where he had been Chair of Surgery. Dr. Alpert’s approach of using a modular system with leading specialists from the US, UK, and the world helped transform the School of Medicine in its early years.

“Starting off with not much—a lecture hall, a small dorm facility and two secretaries—Dr. Alpert single-handedly created the clinical program at KMC,” said Dr. C.V. Rao, Dean of Students. “He was a kind man but very strict and truly cared about all his students. And they also felt the same way, evidenced by the standing ovation he would receive when attending the SOM graduation ceremony in New York.”

“As SGU celebrates the first 40 years of its existence, what better way to do this than a formal dedication to Dr. Morris Alpert—honoring him for both his unique vision and leadership style which served our University well,” added Dr. Allen Pensick, Provost Emeritus. “For our students, there were at least 28 years of classes, twice a year, that went through St. Vincent. A great deal of our students and alumni met Dr. Alpert and got a real-life taste of medicine and how to conduct themselves in the real world.”

A member of the 1977 Charter Class, Dr. Emmett Cox II suffered a tragic bike accident early on in his studies at SGU. The first to treat Dr. Cox was Dr. Alpert, who saved his student’s life. Dr. Cox, has since become a successful orthopedic surgeon—and a hand surgeon like his mentor, Dr. Alpert.

“He was such a strong-willed person and yet so polite. He would tell us to respect our patients and learn our anatomy, and take time out to do a standard physical examination,” recalled Dr. Cox. “I feel so proud to have been trained and received my tutelage from Dr. Alpert. He taught us to never give up on your dreams no matter what. If he told you something, you could bank on it. And in my lifetime, he was a giant.”

The bronze plaque is only the most recent way in which St. George’s University has saluted Dr. Alpert’s impactful role in its growth and success. In addition to dedicating the building of Morris Alpert Hall to his memory, the Morris Alpert Scholarships exist in honor of the high moral and ethical standards he set for his students during his tenure on the faculty of St. George’s University. Dr. Alpert’s knowledge, dedication, and enthusiasm exemplified the University’s commitment to taking the practice of medicine to new and unanticipated heights.