Spring 2017 Class Begins Journey as Future Veterinarians at School of Veterinary Medicine White Coat Ceremony

At the Spring 2017 School of Veterinary Medicine White Coat Ceremony on January 28, the newest class of St. George’s University students donned their newly received white coats and collectively recited the Oath of Professional Commitment. Like the more than 1,200 veterinarian graduates of SGU had done before, they dedicated their professional future to the thorough and ethical care of animals.

“The White Coat Ceremony is one of my favorite events of the year, and I am thrilled and honored to be here to share this day with you,” enthused keynote speaker Douglas A. Freeman, Professor and Dean of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Canada. “The White Coat Ceremony is our opportunity to formally induct you into the profession and to welcome you as colleagues into the amazing and wonderful veterinary medicine community.

“This profession has evolved from farm animal care, to equine care to small animal care, and you too must be resilient as you evolve throughout your veterinary medical career,” advised Dr. Freeman. “There are many jobs available in the veterinary profession, from academia and research to the military and industry. You may try a lot of different things. You don’t have to choose just one path. So as you embark on your journey of lifelong discovery, I wish you great success.”

Alumnus and Master of Ceremonies Heather Douglas, DVM SGU ‘06, knew exactly how the matriculating class felt as first-term students, and counseled them to make the most of the opportunity to study at SGU. Dr. Douglas is now the owner and veterinarian at Douglas Animal Hospital in Osseo, Minnesota. She said that, through the commitment of her professors, colleagues, and the welcoming community, she gained invaluable opportunities and a deep-rooted love for the Spice Isle.

“Being in Grenada and attending this University gave me a wonderful opportunity, and I feel I am successful in my career in veterinary medicine because of SGU,” shared Dr. Douglas, President of Douglas Animal Hospital and Visiting Professor at St. George’s University. “You too have everything you could possibly need right here to become a successful veterinarian.”

Attending his first-ever School of Veterinary Medicine White Coat Ceremony was Dr. Joseph Childers, recently appointed Provost of St. George’s University. He welcomed and congratulated the students on this next step they were about to take and, although not a veterinarian himself, connected with the students through his area of expertise—literature.

“Some of the greatest literature that was ever produced—works by Anna Sewell, George Orwell, and Jack London—are actually written by the point of view of an animal,” Dr. Childers said. “This was emblematic of who we are as human beings and our connection to the animal world. We are absolutely dependent on our animals, and who will speak for them, who will communicate with them?

“I recognize the importance of seeking an MD and the importance of what people do as medical doctors but they have a distinct advantage, they are able to communicate directly with their patients,” added Dr. Childers. “ You are called to something a little bit higher, a little bit more noble and I think in many ways much more self less. You’re advocating for creatures that cannot advocate for themselves, the creatures that we depend on. You have a double responsibility to not only deliver that kind of care and compassion but also to be those advocates. I think this speaks to the core of humanity and I congratulate you on your choice and I welcome you to St. George’s University. “

Dr. Chadd Tindall, an alumnus from the very first class of the School of Veterinary Medicine in 1999 and currently the Director of the SVM Office of Career Guidance, attended the ceremony. In addition, Dr. Austin Kirwan, Assistant Dean of UK Affairs in the School of Veterinary Medicine, who took the opportunity to robe his son, Elliot, now a first-term veterinary student.

“It was a fantastic experience. It was a long journey to actually get where you are and you would never believe that your child would be following so closely in your own footsteps but I think it brings home what SGU is actually all about,” Dr. Kirwan said afterward. “We are one family, it’s one nation, it’s one health, it’s one medicine, and it’s an absolute privilege. I graduated on that stage with my MBA from SGU and I’ve introduced my son to the veterinary faculty and school on that same stage, so it was a fantastic moment.”

The School of Veterinary Medicine accepted its first class in August of 1999, followed six years later by the installation of the first international chapter of Phi Zeta National Veterinary Honor Society on campus, the Alpha Delta Chapter. In September 2011, the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education announced its full accreditation of the St. George’s University Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for seven years. Five years later, in October 2016, the American Animal Hospital Association gave its stamp of approval, accrediting the SVM Small Animal Clinic for two years, making it only the second practice outside of the US and Canada to earn the distinction.

St. George’s University SVM Dean Named to AAVMC Board

The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) has named Dr. Timothy Ogilvie, St. George’s University’s Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, to its Board of Directors and Governance. Dr. Ogilvie will serve as Region IV At-Large Director, representing  AVMA Council on Education-accredited veterinary medical schools in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Europe.

Dr. Tim Ogilvie“I take great pride in representing these schools, especially SGU,” said Dr. Ogilvie. “I am honored to be selected. It’s a great opportunity for me to encourage programming at AAVMC that builds upon our strengths and that our members can take advantage of. It’s also very valuable for a Dean to get exposed to new ideas and to work with colleagues who can lend their support when facing various challenges.”

The AAVMC was formed in 1966 by the deans of the 18 US and three Canadian veterinary colleges to promote and protect the health and welfare of animals, people and the environment by generating new knowledge and preparing the high-quality veterinary workforce needed to meet continually changing societal demands for veterinary expertise.

Today, the AAVMC coordinates the affairs of all 30 US veterinary medical colleges, all five Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine, eight US departments of veterinary science, eight US departments of comparative medicine, eight international veterinary schools, three veterinary medical education organizations, and four affiliate international veterinary schools. The association represents more than 4,000 faculty, 5,000 staff, 10,000 veterinary students, and 3,000 graduate students at these institutions.

“This appointment not only helps to build SGU’s brand, credibility, and reputation; it also allows me to help in making sure that the AAVMC, as an organization for the colleges of veterinary medicine, continues to think about students first,” stated Dr. Ogilvie. “Our colleges are training grounds for veterinary medical students so it has to be a student-centered program that we deliver. We must ensure that we think of the deeper mission of education.

“One of the goals of the AAVMC is to help promote wider accreditation,” he added. “Today, we are on the cusp of getting more global standards in place. We at SGU are positioned to understand well the international competencies for veterinarians, and this allows me to continue to push the agenda forward for quality assessment and quality assurances for the provision of educational programs for veterinary students.”

Dr. Ogilvie was appointed Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine in 2014 after spending six years as a Visiting Professor in the SVM. For his career, he was a founding faculty member of Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC) following his appointment as the Director of the Animal Industry Services branch within the Prince Edward Island Department of Agriculture and Forestry. Dr. Ogilvie later served as Chair of the AVC’s Department of Health Management (1990-1998) and Acting Dean (1998-1999), while also co-directing AVC’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The AVC Vet Camp was renamed the Dr. Tim Ogilvie AVC Vet Camp in 2009 and recently was acknowledged by the Canadian Council for the Advancement of Education as the best community outreach program in the country.

Published on 11/29/16

St. George’s University and Botswana Demonstrate Commitment to Reducing the Medical Brain Drain

Medical Doctors, Doctors of Veterinary Medicine and Public Health Graduates Celebrated at Gaborone Ceremony

Thirty-five Batswana graduates from St George’s University, the centre of international education on the Caribbean island of Grenada, will celebrate their achievement at the commencement ceremony on Saturday, 19 November at the Botswana TraveLodge in the country’s capital city.

botswana

This is the second time that such a graduation ceremony has been held outside the United States in the 40 year history of St George’s University. The first occasion was in 2012, also in Gaborone. The Batswana students have graduated from St George’s University schools of medicine, veterinary medicine, and the graduate studies programme.

“We are very pleased to be honouring the hard work of these graduates and now expect them to make a major contribution to medical and other professional services in their own country”, commented Dr G Richard Olds, the President and Chief Executive Officer of St George’s University.

“We have had a long and successful relationship with the University of Botswana’s medical school and with the Ministries of Education and Health. With four doctors for every 10,000 people in Botswana, it is vital that the medical doctor graduates in particular help to redress the brain drain which has resulted in 800 Batswana doctors working overseas or outside their own country”.

Dr Olds pointed out that Botswana had graduated more MD students through St George’s University than any African country, apart from Nigeria. “Botswana and St George’s University have produced 97 MD graduates, with 22 students still working for their degrees at our university”, he added. “We believe that Botswana has the potential to become a major medical hub for the region”.

The commencement ceremony held later this month will celebrate the entrance of the Batswana graduands into the country’s workforce and honour St George’s University’s Batswana alumni who are already working towards better health care delivery in Botswana. It will also acknowledge the strong relationship between St George’s University and the government, partner institutions and the people of Botswana.

Published on 11/18/16

St. George’s University Small Animal Clinic Obtains AAHA Accreditation

For more than 15 years, the St. George’s University Small Animal Clinic (SAC) has provided quality care for animals throughout Grenada. This month, the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) gave its stamp of approval, accrediting the SAC for two years, making it the second practice outside the United States and Canada to earn the distinction.

small animal clinic

Comprised of 10 clinicians and 15 support staff, the Small Animal Clinic is open year-round and around the clock, welcoming between 5,000 and 7,000 patients for wellness visits, emergencies, and surgeries. In addition, the SAC has been a clinical training venue for more than 1,200 School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) graduates.

“Accreditation proves that we are practicing a standard of excellence at the Small Animal Clinic,” said Dr. Christina Fernandez, DVM SGU ’07, Immediate Past Director of the SAC and an SVM Associate Professor in Emergency Critical Care. “The AAHA assessed what we’re teaching our students, providing for our clients, and how we work together as a business. On all of these fronts, we showed that we are doing a really good job.”

“AAHA accreditation provides an enhanced and enriched learning environment for students,” added Dr. Tim Ogilvie, Dean, St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine. “It is a point of pride for clinicians and staff, and it is a measure of quality and service focus for clients comparable to the best standards of care for animal patients.”

The SAC team began working toward AAHA accreditation in 2015, studying their efficiency of the practice, changing protocols, and updating the facility with state-of-the-art equipment. Earlier this month, an AAHA representative visited Grenada to measure the clinic on more than 900 mandatory and additional standards. The SAC attained accreditation for two years, and will be evaluated for potential three-year re-accreditation in 2018. According to the AAHA, only 12 to 15 percent of all veterinary practices in the US are accredited.

Dr. Wayne Sylvester, a longtime SVM Associate Professor and SAC Clinician, assumed the role of Interim Director, taking over for Dr. Fernandez on July 1.

“At the Small Animal Clinic, we are constantly striving to improve the standard of veterinary practice while optimizing the delivery of our services to our patients, clients and the community,” Dr. Sylvester said. “AAHA accreditation is a monumental accomplishment. It is a clear demonstration of the dedication and professionalism of our team, and we will continue to maintain the highest possible standards.”

For Dr. Fernandez, accreditation is only the latest feather in the clinic’s cap. She has witnessed tremendous improvements at the SAC since arriving at SGU as a student in 2003. “The clinic has changed so much, and the quality of medicine and teaching that the faculty offers is really outstanding at this point,” Dr. Fernandez said.

It has not only provided care and clinical training for SGU students but it has shifted Grenadians’ perspective of pet ownership. “Years ago, pets were considered property – they had a job to do, like to guard property or hunt,” Dr. Fernandez said. “Now we’re seeing more and more Grenadians who are proud of their animals. They bring their pets in for preventive care as opposed to just when they’re sick. They’re part of the family now.”

Published on 10/18/16

St. George’s University Veterinarians-In-Training Welcomed At Fall 2016 White Coat Ceremony

The School of Veterinary Medicine welcomed its newest class of future veterinarians at St. George’s University’s Fall 2016 White Coat Ceremony on August 27 at Patrick F. Adams Hall. Donning their white coats and reciting the Oath of Professional Commitment, it marked the students’ official entry into the veterinary profession.

svm white coat ceremony august 2016 group of students

Ten years prior, alumnus and Master of Ceremonies Dr. Thomas Monaco, DVM SGU ’09, made such a step himself. He reflected on his journey into veterinary medicine and admitted it would not have been possible without SGU giving him the opportunity to attend veterinary medical school – setting him on the path to becoming a board-certified small animal surgeon at Katonah Bedford Veterinary Center in New York.

“Now you all are in the same position with the same opportunities that I had,” extolled Dr. Monaco. “Be proactive and utilize the talented and dedicated faculty available to you at SGU. While we can all appreciate the luxury of attending veterinary school at a place where most people come for vacation, it is critical that you always remind yourself of the real reason you are here, and that is to become a doctor of veterinary medicine.”

Dr. Monaco stressed balance and time management to the future vets. He encouraged them to become caring and reliable colleagues. “The veterinary community is relatively small and everyone seems to know everyone, whether you are aware of it or not,” he counseled. “As you progress in your career, having a reputation as a great colleague will go a long way.”

Now entering his second year as President and Chief Executive Officer of St. George’s University, Dr. G. Richard Olds was pleased to share in the happy occasion. Having spent most of his career as a physician working closely with veterinarians, he emphasized the link between veterinary medicine, human medicine, nursing, and all the health professions under the banner of One Health, One Medicine.

Dr. Timothy Ogilvie, Dean of SGU’s School of Veterinary Medicine, also offered his advice, drawing from his 42 years in veterinary medicine. He then introduced the ceremony’s keynote speaker, Dr. Sheila Allen, Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Georgia. Dr. Allen has been extensively involved in developing and revising the college’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine curriculum. Through the use of famous quotes from American cinema and personal reflections of her 35 years of experience in the veterinary profession, she hoped that her heartfelt words would both inspire and resonate with the incoming class.

“How you handle failure builds a whole lot more character than how you celebrate victory,” she advised. “Secondly, don’t compare yourself to others. I promise you your class rank will not be on your diploma or your tombstone. And finally, when you can truly celebrate the achievement of another person as much as your own, or even more so than your own, it is truly liberating.”

St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine was first established in August 1999, followed six years later by the installation of the first international chapter of Phi Zeta National Veterinary Honor Society on campus, the Alpha Delta Chapter. In September of 2011, the School’s DVM program was granted full accreditation by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE) for seven years. The School of Veterinary Medicine continues to strive toward being a leader in providing veterinary knowledge and technology, while expanding its curriculum and adding new state-of-the-art laboratories and classrooms.

By Ray-Donna Peters

Published on 9/1/16

School of Veterinary Medicine Confers Degrees oo 2016 Class

The energy and excitement was palpable in Alice Tully Hall as the graduating class reunited after spending their final year across five countries. The 2016 St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine graduating class reconvened at Lincoln Center in New York for their commencement ceremony.

svm commencement june 2016

Chancellor Modica and President Olds both addressed the students and congratulated them on their hard work and achievements. The cheering was endless as the graduates walked across the stage to receive their diplomas. Many of the graduates were hooded by one of their parents or a loved one, adding to the joy of the ceremony.

Among them were Zachary Pearl, DVM SGU ’16, and his fiancée, Morgan McMillan, DVM SGU ’16, who will join a small animal practice in Cincinnati. They will be mentored in veterinary business ownership and management with the goal of opening their own practice. Dr. Pearl described the celebration in New York as “surreal,” rejoining his classmates after their clinical year and picking up right where they left off.

“I would recommend SGU to anybody who wishes to pursue veterinary medicine,” he said. “I felt that we were as academically prepared for clinics, if not more than the students who went to schools stateside. Combine that with living on a paradise island for three years and it really couldn’t be better anywhere else.

“I made so many local friends as well as met colleagues from around the world,” he added. “They say networking is everything, and there really isn’t a better place to meet a more diverse group of people than SGU.”

Sarah Schott, DVM SGU ’16, is moving on to become an Associate Veterinarian at Green Meadow Veterinary Hospital, a mixed animal practice in Marietta, OH. She enrolled at SGU with the idea of returning home to work with large and small animals. At Green Meadow, Dr. Schott will practice alongside her mentor, Jessica Smith-Kidd, DVM SGU ’06.

She called her SGU experience “truly life-changing” and enjoyed the opportunity to celebrate once more with her friends from True Blue.

“Commencement was truly an experience that I will never forget,” Dr. Schott said. “There is something to be said about being able to stand beside the people that became your family over the past four years, and knowing that you will always have people that shared the same experience you did. If I had to go back and do it again, I would do it exactly the same.”

By earning their degrees, this year’s graduates join more than 1,000 St. George’s University DVMs from 29 countries. DVM alumni have gone on to practice in 47 US states and 10 countries since the School of Veterinary Medicine opened in 1999.

Published on 6/20/16

School of Veterinary Medicine Confers Degrees to 2016 Class

The energy and excitement was palpable in Alice Tully Hall as the graduating class reunited after spending their final year across five countries. The 2016 St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine graduating class reconvened at Lincoln Center in New York for their commencement ceremony.

svm-commencement

Chancellor Modica and President Olds both addressed the students and congratulated them on their hard work and achievements. The cheering was endless as the graduates walked across the stage to receive their diplomas. Many of the graduates were hooded by one of their parents or a loved one, adding to the joy of the ceremony.

Among them were Zachary Pearl, DVM SGU ’16, and his fiancée, Morgan McMillan, DVM SGU ’16, who will join a small animal practice in Cincinnati. They will be mentored in veterinary business ownership and management with the goal of opening their own practice. Dr. Pearl described the celebration in New York as “surreal,” rejoining his classmates after their clinical year and picking up right where they left off.

“I would recommend SGU to anybody who wishes to pursue veterinary medicine,” he said. “I felt that we were as academically prepared for clinics, if not more than the students who went to schools stateside. Combine that with living on a paradise island for three years and it really couldn’t be better anywhere else.

“I made so many local friends as well as met colleagues from around the world,” he added. “They say networking is everything, and there really isn’t a better place to meet a more diverse group of people than SGU.”

Sarah Schott, DVM SGU ’16, is moving on to become an Associate Veterinarian at Green Meadow Veterinary Hospital, a mixed animal practice in Marietta, OH. She enrolled at SGU with the idea of returning home to work with large and small animals. At Green Meadow, Dr. Schott will practice alongside her mentor, Jessica Smith-Kidd, DVM SGU ’06.

She called her SGU experience “truly life-changing” and enjoyed the opportunity to celebrate once more with her friends from True Blue.

“Commencement was truly an experience that I will never forget,” Dr. Schott said. “There is something to be said about being able to stand beside the people that became your family over the past four years, and knowing that you will always have people that shared the same experience you did. If I had to go back and do it again, I would do it exactly the same.”

By earning their degrees, this year’s graduates join more than 1,000 St. George’s University DVMs from 29 countries. DVM alumni have gone on to practice in 47 US states and 10 countries since the School of Veterinary Medicine opened in 1999.

Brandon University and St. George’s University Sign Education Agreement for Medicine and Veterinary Medicine

Students will have new options to get a degree in medicine or veterinary medicine, thanks to a new agreement between Brandon University (BU) and Saint George’s University.

(left to right) Brandon University President, Dr. Gervan Fearon, and Dr. P. Benjamin Robinson, Assistant Director of Admission – Canada, for St. George's University

(left to right) Brandon University President, Dr. Gervan Fearon, and Dr. P. Benjamin Robinson, Assistant Director of Admission – Canada, for St. George’s University

 

The two institutions today signed a Memorandum of Understanding that will allow students to obtain medical or veterinary degrees at Saint George’s, in Grenada, after taking either a three- or four-year pre-professional science degree at BU.

“This is an extraordinary opportunity for students at Brandon University to broaden their cultural and geographic horizons while furthering their education,” said Acting Dean of the Faculty of Science Dr. Austin Gulliver. “There is very strong demand for physicians and veterinarians in Manitoba, and this agreement helps us educate Manitoba students to help meet that demand.”

Manitoba’s Labour Market Forecast predicts that there will be 1,300 job openings for physicians, dentists and veterinarians by 2021.

After two years at Saint George’s, medical students will take another two years in clinical rotation at affiliated hospitals in the Canada, the United States or the United Kingdom. Students of veterinary medicine will take three years at Saint George’s, followed by a year of clinical rotation at affiliated veterinary schools in Canada, the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, or Ireland.

”We are very excited to be announcing this agreement with Brandon University,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President and CEO of St. George’s University. “With the need for physicians and veterinarians on the rise in Canada – particularly in rural areas – we look forward to addressing this shortage by expanding the opportunities for BU students to receive a high-quality, international education here in Grenada.”

This new agreement builds on existing agreements that BU has for students to obtain a medical degree at the University of Manitoba, or a veterinary medicine degree at the University of Saskatchewan.

Brandon University President, Dr. GervanFearon, said that the new international agreement was a natural fit for the two institutions. “We are advancing our international activities at BU by increasing international student recruitment and providing our students with more opportunities for international experience,” Dr. Fearon said. “Today’s agreement reflects this broad internationalization theme at Brandon University.”

“In today’s world, it is important for students, citizens and universities to look globally for the best solutions,” he said. “Not only have we found a great partner in Saint George’s, but our partnership helps us supply solutions right here in Brandon and in Manitoba.”

Published on 4/21/16

St. George’s University and University Of Delaware Launch Medical, Veterinary Partnership

St. George’s University and the University of Delaware announced a new partnership which will enable qualified University of Delaware undergraduates to pursue advanced medical and veterinary degrees at St. George’s University in Grenada.

University of Delaware partnership hand shake

“We are thrilled to welcome the University of Delaware into our growing University community,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President and CEO of St. George’s University. “By further expanding our network of partners, we are continuing to provide a pathway for students from around the world to pursue medical and veterinary education.”

Upon receiving their bachelor’s degree, qualified students from the University of Delaware will have the option to pursue a degree in medicine or veterinary medicine at St. George’s University in Grenada. Students in St. George’s School of Medicine will complete their first two years of medical study in Grenada and their final two years in U.S. or U.K. clerkship programs. Those in the veterinary school will spend three years in Grenada before completing their final clinical year elsewhere.

University of Delaware partnership campus

The University of Delaware joins a diverse group of over 15 colleges and universities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada that have partnered with St. George’s University. The University also has similar partnerships with Mahidol University International College in Thailand and schools in Bermuda, Grenada, Hong Kong, Guyana, and Uganda.

“This agreement further enhances our relationship with St. George’s University and will provide our students with the opportunity to continue their journey to becoming professionals in the fields of medicine and veterinary medicine,” said Lynn Okagaki, UD deputy provost for academic affairs.

“We are pleased today to announce that the University of Delaware has entered into an agreement with St. George’s University in the West Indies that will expand opportunities for qualified UD students to pursue a career in medicine or veterinary medicine,” said David Barlow, director of the Center Premedical/Health Profession Studies. “It is designed for students who are certain that they want to become physicians or veterinarians and who desire a program of study that blends the scientific aspect of these professions in a highly diverse international setting.”

Published on 3/28/16

An Amazing Profession Spring 2016 DVM Class Begins Its Journey

The newest class of veterinary students at St. George’s University donned the emblematic White Coat and recited the Oath of Professional Commitment, signifying their entry into the profession of veterinary medicine on January 30.

SVM White Coat Spring 2016

“It’s an amazing and well-respected profession,” declared Dr. Jessica Harmon, DVM SGU ’13.  Dr. Harmon, this term’s emcee, welcomed and congratulated the incoming veterinary class.  “You made it,” she rejoiced, “but this is where the real work begins. This is the beginning of a long but very rewarding journey.”

Currently an associate at the McDavitt Veterinary Clinic in Zionsville, Indiana, Dr. Harmon credits her experience in Grenada as having shaped her successful career as a veterinarian. “The education I received at SGU went past knowledge,” she said. “It taught me to be a compassionate veterinarian and care for all of my patients.”

Attending his second School of Veterinary Medicine White Coat Ceremony was Dr. G. Richard Olds, Chief Executive Officer of St. George’s University and its first-ever President. “The White Coat Ceremony itself is relatively new, started by Columbia University in the early 1990s, with SGU being one of the first medical and veterinary schools to hold a White Coat Ceremony just three years later,” said Dr. Olds. “Symbolic of all health professions uniting in one health, the White Coat Ceremony is now almost universal. And so today, you too will go through the process of donning the white coat as you begin your health professional journey.”

As both a physician and a tropical disease specialist, Dr. Olds has spent most of his professional career working largely with veterinarians. “I know the importance of all the health care professionals who share in the unified theme of improving the health of our planet,” he stated.

Dr. Timothy Ogilvie , Dean of the SVM, shared four tips with the matriculating class that have served him well in his 41 years in the field of veterinary medicine. “Show up – because real change is made by those who show up and stick around. Keep up – don’t fall behind in your studies; this is a volume intensive program. Step up – colleagues, community members, and others will look to you for leadership. And lastly, cheer up – SGU is a great place and you’re going to have fun.” Dr. Ogilvie reminded the newly enrolled students, “You’re going to learn in an international environment, a cosmopolitan environment, and in a different culture. You have every opportunity to count your lucky stars and be cheerful.” He also took the opportunity to introduce his longtime friend and fellow Canadian, Dr. Trevor Ames, to deliver this year’s keynote address.

Twice a year for at least 10 years, Dr. Ames has been welcoming SGUSVM students to the University of Minnesota for their clinical year, where he currently serves as Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine.  Addressing the incoming students, Dr. Ames said,  “Today as you put on this coat you signify to those around you that you understand the professional, ethical, and social responsibilities of being a veterinarian.  “I would encourage you to not only think of today as your entry into veterinary school but also as your entry into the profession and begin practicing the ethical behavior and the responsible acts required of a graduate veterinarian.”

“The PAWS (Professional Attributes Workshop) training will not only help you succeed as a student but, after you graduate, those same traits will be just as important to your success as a veterinarian,” counseled Dr. Ames, “It’s as important as all of the facts and knowledge you will learn over the next four years.”

The School of Veterinary Medicine accepted its first class in August of 1999. In 2005, SGUSVM installed the first international chapter of Phi Zeta National Veterinary Honor Society on campus, the Alpha Delta Chapter. In September 2011, the DVM program was granted full accreditation by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE) for seven years. Graduates, who come from 27 countries, have been licensed to practice in 47 US states, and in 10 countries around the world including Canada, the UK, and South Africa.

Published on 2/4/16