St. George’s University Recognized for Initiative in Reaching International Community via the Web

sgu recognized for initiative in reaching international community via webFounded in 1991, Sonic Foundry is a technology leader in the emerging rich media communications marketplace. This cutting edge organization selected SGU as a finalist for the Global Reach Award as part of its third annual Rich Media Impact Awards.  This award recognizes SGU’s successful initiative in reaching the international community through the use of Sonic Foundry’s Mediasite technology.

Mediasite is a communication medium which delivers information through a transformational webcasting system.  SGU currently uses Mediasite to capture and deliver key presentations and lectures via the web. An example of which is Dr. John R. David’s 8th Annual WINDREF Lecture which can be viewed under the Lectures at SGU subhead of News and Events on the SGU home page.

Sonic Foundry launched the Rich Media Impact Awards program to recognize excellence in the practical and creative integration of its webcasting platform in business, education, health and government.  Sixteen organizations across eight categories will be honored at a special awards dinner in Madison, WI on May 7th where winners in each category including Global Reach will be announced.

Published on 4/25/07

An Award for Prime Movers – the Order of the Mace

The Chancellor Charles Modica Awarded with the MaceSGU created the Order of the Mace to coincide with the 30th Anniversary of the University.  This award is symbolic of the unique spirit of our University and will be granted to those rare individuals who embody and drive that spirit forward into the community, the region and the world.

Chancellor Charles R. Modica was honored as the first inductee into the Order of the Mace at the 30th Anniversary Awards Ceremony on January 17, 2007.  Dr. Modica was recognized for the vision and leadership that established SGU as an internationally respected academic institution.  His continuous pursuit of excellence is evident in the faculty of three schools – Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and Arts and Sciences – the highly regarded international partnerships and programs, the students from over 100 countries, the investigative projects and research institute, and the beautiful campus he has worked tirelessly to create.

Dr. Modica’s dedication and drive goes beyond the University gates, as he works diligently to improve the socio-economic standards of the Grenada community.  As Ambassador-At-Large for Grenada, he has worked to promote the country’s infrastructure in health, industry, business, and tourism.  His charge is to promote tourism in the country, working with businesses to encourage better access to the island.

The Chancellor is a generous supporter and contributor to several worthy local charitable organizations including the Fund for Orphans and Elderly, the Grenada Heart Foundation and the Bel Air Home for Children.  He clearly recognizes the immediate needs of those less fortunate, and leads by example through his significant philanthropic endeavors.

Dr. Modica personifies those exceptional qualities that make a true visionary.  This is why he has been selected to be the first recipient of the Order of the Mace.


The Origin of the Mace

Mace is in many ways representative of the path the University and its founders have taken in order to evolve to an internationally recognized academic institution.

The custom of carrying a ceremonial mace at the head of a solemn procession dates back to Medieval European times.  The original mace had both form and function, as a symbol of power and a weapon to divide the crowds in a procession.  Great universities later adopted the use of a mace for much the same reasons.

In modern times, the carrying of a purely ornamental mace has become an expected part of all formal academic ceremonies.  The design of each mace incorporates unique identifiers of the university it represents.  The St. George’s University Mace is no exception.

The first University Mace was designed for the earliest graduation ceremonies.  The wood carving featured a wooden sword with a dragon twisted around it, representing the sword and dragon of Saint George, the 4th century Christian figure and namesake of the University.  The pommel of the sword is a nutmeg, to symbolize our host nation of Grenada.

The design utilized in the award given to the Order of the Mace inductees has  recently been refined by the highly regarded, award-winning Grenadian artist, Wayne Snagg, being aptly formed from a single piece of Grenadian mahogany.
The Nomination and Selection Process for the Award Recipient
A Nomination Committee was formed to include members of the Steering Committee along with the Chair of the Academic Board, President of the University Alumni and President of the Faculty Senate.

The Nomination Committee is responsible for creating the nomination and application form, compiling all nominees by established deadline, screening and narrowing the application pool to 3 to 5, and submitting the chosen candidates to the Chair of the University Council of Deans (UCD) by the deadline.  The UCD may also include co-opted members from the four countries in which SGU campuses are located.

Should the Committee not find a suitable candidate, no award will be given.  The Order of the Mace is a prestigious honor which is awarded solely on merit, not on an annual or biannual basis.   The University Council of Deans will make the final determination of the number of awards per year.
The Award Presentation

Upon final selection of the recipient, a public ceremony will be held in the country where the awardees reside or another appropriate venue as determined by the UCD or the Chancellor.  At the ceremony, the selected candidate will be honored and presented with a framed certificate and a miniature mace.

Published 2/20/2007

Grenada’s Prime Minister visits University Praising Commitment to Grenadian Education

Charles Modica and Dr. Lorenz Shaking HandsGrenada’s Prime Minister applauds the University’s innovative and resourceful efforts in meeting the growing educational needs of Grenadians and the wider Caribbean region. Dr. the Right Honorable Keith C. Mitchell expressed this sentiment on an official visit to St. George’s University’s True Blue campus on Thursday, 21 September 2006.

The Prime Minister and a delegation of Government Ministers were led on a tour of the campus by the Chancellor and University representatives. Among the stops were the two new construction sites for lecture halls. When asked about his impression of the University, Dr. Mitchell was clearly pleased by the advances he witnessed first hand, and continues to support. “We have always been very impressed by the work done by St. George’s University, in particular as it relates to the training of our medical professionals. Of course, as a country we have benefited enormously from this.” The University is one of the largest employers on the island and the influx of students from scores of countries into the medical school pumps income into the community.

The Prime Minister gave special praise and support for the increased enrollment and development in the undergraduate courses. “I think the increase in the University particularly in the undergraduate program is something that we must be very proud of. I’ve always felt very strongly that in our individual countries there are enough human resources to be able to train and develop all the educational needs of the country… so the advent of the initiative of St. George’s University with so many excellent programs is a major plus for the country.”

On the topic of access to higher education, the Prime Minister waxed eloquent, “I think what’s good is that the St. George’s University initiative in providing scholarships and training opportunities for people who express need and interest in developing themselves must be seen as a noble effort. We’ll continue to support that initiative.”

In the press conference which followed the tour, Chancellor Modica reiterated the University’s commitment to increasing access to quality tertiary education in Grenada, “We are working now to increase the numbers of scholarships, full scholarships as well as partial scholarships so that any Grenadian who is qualified and really desires to have a higher education can find a place here at home.”

Among the Government Ministers present were the Hon. Clarice Modeste-Curwen (Minister of Works) and Hon. Ann-David Antoine (Minister of Health), both members of the Government’s University Monitoring Committee. Both Ministers thanked the University for its excellent corporate spirit. The visit ended with a renewed charge to further expand the collaboration between the University and the Government of Grenada for the mutual benefit of the Grenadian and University communities.

Published on 09/27/2006

Grenada and Campus Post-Ivan Progress Report

Sometimes a force as strong as a category four hurricane that disrupts life as we know and live it will also bring unexpected bonuses as we adjust to new patterns of living. The University has been honoured to facilitate a number of national and regional meetings and gatherings at the Bell Lecture and Caribbean House Great Halls.

Grenada Parliament finds a temporary home at the Bell Lecture Hall.

The House of Representatives, the lower House of Parliament, held a session at the Bell Lecture Hall on Friday, 5th November, 2004. It was the first session since Ivan struck Grenada on September 7th. York House, the seat of the Grenada Parliament suffered significant damage as a result of the hurricane and was unable to accommodate the proceedings. When the Speaker of the House of Representatives approached St. George’s University for a suitable venue to convene Parliament, the University readily offered the Bell Lecture Hall. The first post-IVAN sitting began at 9:00 a.m. and concluded at 6:00 p.m. This session was particularly important because it gave voice to concerns about and suggestions for the total reconstruction of Grenada in the wake of Hurricane Ivan.

The House of Representatives met for a second time at the Bell Lecture Hall on Thursday, 18th November, while the Senate, the Upper House, held its first session at SGU on November 16th, 2004.

The Director of the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) Tours the University

Dr. Denis Paul, Dr. Periago, and Dr. Macpherson

Dr. Denis Paul, Dr. Periago, and Dr. Macpherson

The Director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Dr. Mirta Roses Periago has met with officials of St. George’s University and the Windward Islands Research & Education Foundation (WINDREF) at SGU.

On a visit to Grenada, during a two-day PAHO workshop on Visioning for the Future, Dr. Roses met with Acting Provost, Dr. Denis Paul and the Director of WINDREF and the Dean of Graduate Studies, Dr. Calum Macpherson. Discussion centered around greater collaboration in research between the University, WINDREF and PAHO.

Dr. Roses was pleased to hear of the University’s success in resuming all programs just weeks after the passage of IVAN. She was also briefed on plans for reconstruction work at the University, which suffered major roof damage during Hurricane IVAN, as well as the areas in which SGU and WINDREF are aiding the Grenada reconstruction effort.
In addition, various student organisations and faculty and staff have found unique ways of relieving tension.

Students in Front of the Student Center Hurricane Ivan
Staff & Student Gatherings
Staff, faculty and students have organised various activities to allow for greater, constructive engagement of each other in informal social settings. These activities have been well attended and praised for their success in reminding individuals that they ought not to take themselves too seriously. The initiatives have included games, office socials and parties.
Students on Basketball Court After Hurricane Ivan
The most recent of these was a fete/talent show for staff and faculty at Caribbean House. One noteworthy performance came from Western Art History lecturer, Mike Meranski, who wrote and recorded a music video about recovery after IVAN. He has given the rights of the song to the School of Arts & Sciences.

Even the rain could not dampen the spirits of the participants, who, on more than one occasion, laughed till they cried.
Students on Basketball Court After Hurricane Ivan Yellow shirt
November 24, 2004

Two months after Hurricane Ivan dramatically changed all aspects of life in Grenada, there is obvious evidence of recovery. Life is again beginning to be shaped by realities outside of the parameters of Hurricane IVAN, a wonderful sign of some normality. Roofs are replacing some tarpaulins, roads have been completely cleared and cleaned, in most areas. The landscape has been transformed to rolling green hills and overgrown shrubbery, compared to the dry, broken trees that dominated in the immediate period following IVAN. The vast majority of Grenadians now speak of reconstruction, rather than relief, all positive signs of a nation well on its way to recovery.

CAMPUS

Having welcomed back almost 300 returning Arts & Sciences, premedical/preveterinary, and Masters of Public Health students on to the True Blue campus September 28th and October 4th, the University staff, faculty and administration have settled down to providing support services for the students in Grenada and for the professional programs temporarily operating in the United States. In addition, faculty and staff in Grenada are assisting with the reconstruction effort.

There was no structural damage to the buildings or to the infrastructure on the campus according to the assessors and insurance companies who examined the campus post-Ivan. Most of the displaced roof tiles on the campus have been removed and broken windows sealed to minimize any additional water damage to campus.

Scores of workers are repairing roofs and subroofs. The campus has been cleared of debris deposited by the hurricane and the early construction phase. The roof on the Chancellery has been repaired and the inside painted. A number of other roofs have been sealed, including the Bourne Centre, Buildings B & C and a number of dorms. Work is proceeding on the Bell Lecture Hall, the Science Building, Anatomy and WINDREF and Founder’s Library.

Housing: Over 50% of the dormitory rooms are habitable and are being used to accommodate Arts & Sciences and Graduate students as well as relief workers and foreign electricity workers, who are assisting with the reconstruction of Grenada’s infrastructure.
Landlords in the True Blue, Grand Anse and surrounding areas are also working tirelessly to repair their rental properties.

Communications: The infrastructure of the phone and fax lines is intact, and the lines are working, with a few disruptions to service. Mobile phones remain the most reliable means of communications. However, the phone service is getting demonstrably better each day. University personnel can be contacted via e-mail. The University can also be reached through its regular central telephone number: (473) 444-4175.

Water supply: There is an adequate supply of water on campus.

Power: The University has installed a second generator, a 1.2 megawatt generating plant, into the campus generator building which already houses a 1.5 megawatt auxiliary generator. With these two plants, we have a total of 2.7 megawatts of power. This not only meets our needs, but the needs of the entire True Blue peninsula. Since the new generating plant is designed to run at half the rpms of the auxilliary generator, there will be lower fuel costs and more efficiency.

Library: The library is presently open to students from 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Our computer labs, which open until midnight, continue to be available to the university community so that they can keep in touch with friends and family via the internet.

Safety:

There have been no reported crimes on the campus and reported storm-related crimes have all but vanished.

Safety of the university community and visitors to campus continues to be a priority for the administration. On Monday, 23rd November the University began a two-week training course for 19 SGU security officers at the Caribbean House Great Hall. The training course, which is being conducted by a Trinidadian Security team, is intended to equip the officers to carry out their duties in a non-intrusive, but effective manner.
Safety Meeting After Hurricane Ivan
The military personnel from the Regional Security Services that were being hosted on campus have moved off campus because the field they were occupying was flooded by the annual November rains. The university security team continues to be vigilant and have tightened security at the point of entry and the point of exit of the university.

BEYOND SGU

The progress that is made each week is astonishing. Stores and businesses are continuing to reopen and others are preparing to do so in time for Christmas. The vast majority of businesses are now operating at pre-IVAN hours. Houses are being repaired; and utilities are being restored at an astonishing rate.

Tourism:
First cruise ship to visit Grenada since IVAN, called on Tuesday, November 9th, 2004 with close to two thousand passengers. Since then, thousands of other passengers have visited on other ships. British Airways, like other airlines has returned to normal operations and is reportedly traveling at full capacity.

Transportation:
Air travel: The Point Salines International Airport resumed commercial operations from Monday, September 13, 2004. At the present time it is open for daily operations from 6:30 a.m., compared to 5:30 a.m. (pre-IVAN) and closes at 10:00 p.m., only half an hour earlier than its pre-IVAN hours.

Power: The Grenada Electricity Company, ably assisted by regional and international organizations, is working tirelessly to restore power to the island. Power has been restored to the hospital, to the town of St. George, and some surrounding communities. The areas include Lowther’s Lane, Grand Anse, True Blue and L’ Anse Aux Epines, Springs, Woodlands, Fort Jeudy & Westerhall Point and Calivigny. Teams have already connected parts of St. John’s, St. Marks’, St. Patrick’s and St. Andrew’s and have begun work in St. David’s.

Water: Service has been restored to the vast majority of communities and businesses throughout the island.

Communications: All telephone companies on the island are operational. Mobile phones are working and are for the time being, the main medium of communication. A number of land lines, including, most at the University, are functional and Cable & Wireless crews are continuing to restore others.

Cable: Grenada Cablevision is also working hard to restore services and has published a schedule for reconnection. Some communities in the south of the island are already enjoying service.

Food Supplies: The Food Fair, Bulk Buy and CK’s supermarkets, all located in the Grand Anse area are open for business daily. Supermarkets in the town of St. George and shops around the country are also operating. Real Value Supermarket and Foodland Supermarket are both working towards opening by January.

Entertainment
Aquarium, True Blue Bay, Bananas, Red Crab, Water’s Edge at Bel Air Plantation, Chef’s Castle, Nutmeg Restaurant and Tout Bagay are open for business.

Triple Reels Cinema at Excel Plaza and the video/DVD stores have also reopened.

Banking facilities: All commercial banks are open from 8:00-2:00 p.m., one hour shy of their normal hours, with a 3:00 p.m. closing time on Fridays. ATM machines are operational.

Medicine: Over the counter and prescription medications are available at pharmacies throughout the island.

Security: The security situation is greatly improved from the period immediately following the storm, although a 12 midnight – 5 a.m. curfew remains in effect.

Carriacou & Petite Martinique: Grenada’s Sister Islands, Carriacou and Petite Martinique were relatively unaffected by Hurricane IVAN.

Please see the related article on SGU/WINDREF relief efforts on the island.

Published on 11/24/2004

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Grenada and Campus Post-Ivan Progress Report

November 3, 2004

Items updated from last week’s report are underlined.

Hurricane Ivan dramatically changed life in Grenada overnight, yet there is an eagerness and determination among Grenadians to rebuild, restore and reclaim the contours of pre-storm life. Throughout the island, businesses, families, schools, churches, and communities have begun the arduous process of restoration. Visitors to the island are deeply affected by the damage done by Ivan, but their first observations are that there is a strong sense of purpose to rebuild this beautiful island and that the spirits of the Grenadian people remain high.

CAMPUS
The University staff, faculty and administration welcomed almost 300 returning Arts & Sciences, premedical/preveterinary, and Masters of Public Health students on to the True Blue campus September 28th and October 4th.

There was no structural damage to the buildings or to the infrastructure on the campus according to the assessors and insurance companies who examined the campus post-Ivan. There were lots of displaced roof tiles and broken windows which caused water damage to parts of the campus.

The campus is overun with workers who are clearing roof tiles, repairing subroofs, replacing roof tiles and windows, and continuing the process of cleaning up.

Staff members have resumed their duties at the University. In addition to their regular duties, they are helping with the clean-up and restoration and some are helping with relief efforts on the island.

Campus Shot After Hurricane Ivan

Housing: Over 50% of the dormitory rooms are habitable and are being used to accommodate Arts & Sciences and Graduate students as well as relief workers and foreign electricity workers, who are assisting with the reconstruction of Grenada’s infrastructure.

Communications: The infrastructure of the phone and fax lines is intact, and the lines are working, with a few disruptions to service. Mobile phones remain the most reliable means of communications. However, the phone service is getting demonstrably better each day. University personnel can be contacted via e-mail. The University can also be reached through its regular central telephone number: (473) 444-4175.

Water supply: The desalination plants are operational and there is an adequate supply of water on campus. The supply is occasionally disrupted due to testing and repairs on campus.

Power: The University’s 1.5 auxiliary generator has been supplemented by a 1.2 generator. This allows full power on campus, and it allows the University to provide power to the entire True Blue peninsula.

Library: The library is presently open to students from 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p. The library did not suffer much damage at all. Our computer labs, which open until midnight, continues to be available to the university community so that they can keep in touch with friends and family via the internet.

Safety: There have been no reported crimes on the campus and reported storm-related crime has waned. Safety of the university community and visitors to campus continues to be a priority for the administration. In addition to having our regular security, we are hosting military personnel from the Regional Security Services. The university has also tightened security at the point of entry and the point of exit of the university.

BEYOND SGU

Although to a newcomer, the destruction seems dismaying, the progress that is made each week is astonishing. Roads have been cleared; stores and businesses are opening up, with revised hours of operation; houses are being repaired; and utilities are being restored. It is heartening to see fresh leaves on the trees, clean roadways and green foliage. It is a reminder of the ability of the environment and by extension, human beings to adapt and rejuvenate.

Transportation:

Air travel: The Point Salines International Airport resumed commercial operations from Monday, September 13, 2004. At the present time it is open for daily operations from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

Land travel – Public transportation is now fully operational. The University buses have also resumed normal operations.

Power: The Grenada Electricity Company, ably assisted by regional and international organizations, is working tirelessly to restore power to the island. Already, power has been restored to the hospital, to the town of St. George, and some surrounding communities. The areas include Lowther’s Lane, Grand Anse, True Blue and L’ Anse Aux Epines, Springs, Woodlands, Fort Jeudy & Westerhall Point and Calivigny. Teams have already connected parts of St. John’s, St. Marks’, St. Patrick’s and St. Andrew’s.

Water: Although a number of lines and mains were damaged or destroyed, service has been restored to the vast majority of communities and businesses throughout the island.

Communications: All telephone companies on the island are operational. Mobile phones are working and are for the time being, the main medium of communication. A number of land lines, including, some at the University, are also functional and Cable & Wireless crews have begun restoring other land lines.

Cable: Grenada Cablevision is also working hard to restore services and has published a schedule for reconnection. Some communities in the south of the island are already enjoying service.

Food Supplies: The Food Fair, Bulk Buy and CK’s supermarkets, all located in the Grand Anse area are open for business daily. Supermarkets in the town of St. George and shops around the country are also operating.

Clothing Releif Efforts for Hurricane Ivan

Banking facilities: All commercial banks are open from 8:00-2:00 p.m., one hour shy of their normal hours. ATM machines are operational.

Medicine: Over the counter and prescription medications can be obtained from the pharmacies which have also re-opened.

Security: The security situation is greatly improved from the period immediately following the storm, although a 12 midnight – 5 a.m. curfew remains in effect.

Carriacou & Petite Martinique: The electricity, water, telephone and cable services in Carriacou and Petite Martinique were never disrupted.

Please see the related article on SGU/WINDREF relief efforts on the island.

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Fall 2004/Spring 2005 Adjusted Calendar

Revised November 1, 2004

Due to hurricane Ivan and the necessity for relocation of many of the University’s programs, the class schedules have been adjusted for the Fall 04 term and then subsequently for the Spring 05 term. The following calendar reflects the new start and end dates for all terms and programs.

Fall 2004 Term
MD Degree

Spring 05 Term
Start Last Exam

T1: Last Date in NY: December 23
Return to GDA: January 10
Last Exam: January 20

T2: Last Date in NY: December 23
Return to GDA: January 10
Last Exam: January 21

T4: Last Date in FL: December 23
Return to SVG January 10
Last Exam: January 14

DVM Degree

A04 Terms 1-6
Last Exam December 20
Last day US campus December 22
Return to GDA January 10**
End of Term January 21
Fall 2004 Term

T1 Feb 8 June 3

T2: Jan 24 May27

T3M: May 30 July 8

T3: Jan 24 March 4
T4: Mar 7 July 8

T5: Jan 18 Feb 25
T6: Feb 28 May 20

Spring 05 Term

T2-T6: Jan 24 May 20
T1 Feb 8 June 3

**The 3 clinical skills courses not completed at US campuses will be completed between January 10 and the 21st. Students who prefer to complete these courses during their next term should write to the Dean. They will resume classes in January 24, 2005. The animal production course will be completed during the Spring 2005 term.

Graduate
MPH
Trimester ends November 30

All March 7 May 13
(Summer 05)
All June 6 July 29

MSc/Dual N/A

SAS
A04 All Terms
Last Exam date: Dec 17 All

T1 (and returning students)
Feb 8 June 3

Feb 8 May 27

Revised, Nov 1, 2004

Grenada and Campus Post-Ivan Progress Report

Hurricane Ivan dramatically changed life in Grenada overnight, yet there is an eagerness and determination among Grenadians to rebuild, restore and reclaim the contours of pre-storm life. Throughout the island, businesses, families, schools, churches, and communities have begun the arduous process of restoration. Visitors to the island are deeply affected by the damage done by Ivan, but their first observations are that there is a strong sense of purpose to rebuild this beautiful island and that the spirits of the Grenadian people remain high.

CAMPUS
The University staff, faculty and administration welcomed almost 300 returning Arts & Sciences, premedical/preveterinary, and Masters of Public Health students on to the True Blue campus September 28th and October 4th.

There was no structural damage to the buildings or to the infrastructure on the campus according to the assessors and insurance companies who examined the campus post-Ivan. There were lots of displaced roof tiles and broken windows which caused water damage to parts of the campus.

The campus is overun with workers who are clearing roof tiles, repairing subroofs, replacing roof tiles and windows, and continuing the process of cleaning up

Staff members have resumed their duties at the University. In addition to their regular duties, they are helping with the clean-up and restoration and some are helping with relief efforts on the island.

Housing: Over 50% of the dormitory rooms are habitable and are being used to accommodate Arts & Sciences and Graduate students as well as relief workers and foreign electricity workers, who are assisting with the reconstruction of Grenada’s infrastructure.

Communications: The infrastructure of the phone and fax lines is intact, and the lines are working, with a few disruptions to service. Mobile phones remain the most reliable means of communications. However, the phone service is getting demonstrably better each day. University personnel can be contacted via e-mail. The University can also be reached through its regular central telephone number: (473) 444-4175.

Water supply: The desalination plants are operational and the water supply on campus is adequate. The supply is occasionally disrupted due to testing and repairs on campus.

Power: The University’s 1.5 auxiliary generator has been supplemented by a 1.2 generator. This allows full power on campus, and it allows the University to provide power to the entire True Blue peninsula.

Library: The library is presently open to students from 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. The library did not suffer much damage at all. Our computer labs continue to be available to the university community so that they can keep in touch with friends and family via the internet.

Safety: There have been no reported crimes on the campus and reported storm-related crime seems to have waned. Safety of the university community continues to be a priority for the administration. In addition to having our regular security, we are hosting military personnel from the Regional Security Services. The university has also tightened security at the point of entry and the point of exit of the university to help ensure the safety of all students, staff, faculty and other visitors to our campus.

ISLAND ENVIRONMENT

Although to a newcomer, the destruction seems dismaying, the progress that is made each week is astonishing. Roads have been cleared; stores and businesses are opening up, although not in continuous operation; houses are being repaired; and utilities are being restored. It is heartening to see fresh leaves on the trees, clean roadways and green foliage. It is a reminder of the ability of the environment and by extension, human beings to adapt and rejuvenate.

Transportation:

Air travel: The Point Salines International Airport resumed commercial operations from Monday, September 13, 2004. At the present time it is open for daily operations from 7:00 am to 5:00 pm.

Land travel: All main roads are passable and public transportation is now fully operational. The University buses have also resumed normal operations.

Power: The Grenada Electricity Company, ably assisted by regional and international organizations, is working tirelessly to restore power to the island. Already, power has been restored to the hospital, to the streets within the town of St. George and some homes where the power lines were not destroyed within the parish of St. George’s. The areas include Grand Anse, True Blue and L’ Anse Aux Epines. In some areas within the parishes of St. Andrew and St. Patrick, the power supply was never disrupted.

Water: Although a number of lines and mains were damaged or destroyed, service has been restored to the vast majority of communities and businesses throughout the island.

Communications: All telephone companies on the island are operational. Mobile phones are working and are for the time being, the main medium of communication. A number of land lines, including, some at the University, are also functional and Cable & Wireless crews have begun restoring other land lines.

Food Supplies: The Food Fair supermarkets located at the Grand Anse Shopping Centre and the Carenage, St. George’s are open for business between the hours of 10:00am and 3:00pm daily. Although a few items are in scarce supply, most food items can be purchased there.

Banking facilities: All commercial banks are open on a daily basis for a few posted hours. ATM machines are operational.

Medicine: Most over the counter and prescription medication can be obtained from the pharmacies which have also re-opened for few hours each day.

Security: The security situation is greatly improved from the period immediately following the storm. There is a very visible presence of personnel from the Regional Security Services. A 12 midnight – 5 a.m. curfew remains in effect.

Please see the related article on SGU/WINDREF relief efforts on the island.

October 28, 2004

New Associate Dean of Clinical Studies

Dr Daniel D RicciardiA new Associate Dean of Clinical Studies for St. George’s University was named in the school’s effort to further expand and enhance the excellent clinical program that is already in place.

Dr. Daniel D. Ricciardi was named Associate Dean of Clinical Studies for St. George’s University effective June 1, 2004. Based in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Ricciardi, under the leadership of Dr. Stephen Weitzman, Dean of the School of Medicine, is charged with the operation of the U.S. clinical program in the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut).

“My job is to make sure the clinical program is fully functional for each and every student in these hospitals,” Dr. Ricciardi said. “We want to give St. George’s students the full clinical experience from both an academic and a professional point of view and we want to offer every student every opportunity to choose what they need and what they want during their rotations.”

Prior to assuming his new post, Dr. Ricciardi served as Director of Medical Education at Long Island College Hospital. He has been active in the healthcare industry in the New York area for many years, serving on several hospital boards. His experience in the New York City hospital business has amply prepared him for his role as Associate Dean, especially in reviewing new sites for programs.

Dr. Ricciardi hopes to take the clinical program to all five boroughs in New York. “I am looking to expand the program and offer St. George’s students the opportunity to do their rotations in almost any hospital in New York, including in Manhattan,” he said.

Dr. Ricciardi proudly joins the ranks of four other Associate Deans of Clinical Studies – Dr. David L. Brown, Dr. Orazio Giliberti, Dr. John Madden, and Dr. Frances McGill.

A member of the charter class of St. George’s University graduating in 1981, Dr. Riccardi decided to become an SGU trailblazer after seeing an ad in the New York Times in 1976. “I was like Christopher Columbus discovering Grenada and discovering St. George’s – and it was great,” Dr. Ricciardi recalled.

Published on 10/06/2004

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Allen H. Pensick, PhD Named Provost

Allen H. Pensick, PhDAllen H. Pensick, PhD, the new Provost at St. George’s University, was living and working in Nebraska as a farmer and horse trainer and was a faculty member at the University of Nebraska when he learned of an open position at St. George’s University. He kept the farm and his love of horses intact in Nebraska and decided to further pursue his love of teaching down in Grenada. He joined the University in 1984 in the microbiology department then located on SGU’s temporary campus in Barbados and has taught and lectured at the University ever since. He became Associate Dean of Basic Sciences in 1989, was named Dean of Basic and Allied Health Sciences in 1992, and became Chairman of the University Council of Deans in 2001. He also served several times as elected chairman of the School of Medicine Faculty Senate.

Dean Pensick is involved in every aspect of University life – from students, to faculty, to other administrators, to the local, regional, and international educational community. The various roles he has played at the University have helped him to understand and recognize the needs and concerns of these diverse groups. He teaches in both the undergraduate and medical schools, keeping in touch with the grass roots of education – teaching. He also advises about six students each year – a mix of men and women from all over the world. “Being involved with the students in this way keeps me in touch with what’s going on with the students, raising my awareness of the issues they may be facing,” Dr. Pensick commented.

As Provost Dr. Pensick will further enhance his roll in the University’s commitment to positive growth and expansion to meet the needs of the local, regional, and international communities. “St. George’s University will continue to be involved in a cooperative way with other institutions in the Caribbean region to support and promote education,” Dr. Pensick said. “We’ve made inroads and have had success regionally and we’re looking to expand on our commitment. On an international level, St. George’s has established itself as a premier institution for higher education.”

Published on 10/06/2004

Research Funds Secured

The Liverpool Support Center, with funds from the Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Department for International Development (British Overseas Development Fund), have agreed to fund the Windward Island’s Research and Education Foundation’s (WINDREF) role in the regional lymphatic filariasis eradication program for the upcoming year. Dr. Calum Macpherson, Director of the WINDREF, an independent research institute located on the True Blue Campus of St. George’s University, stated that the funding amount is yet to be determined, but is expected to be around US$50,000.

In addition to supporting WINDREF’s involvement in this worthwhile program, the funds will provide educational support for St. George’s University PhD student Dr. Shamdeo Persaud, MPH student Karen Cummings, MD and MSc Microbiology student, Ede Langevine, current Head of the Department of Medical Technology at the University of Guyana. This recent news means that the two new students can begin in August.

Dr. Macpherson explained that this is an exciting continuation of WINDREF’s positive international links with the global alliance for the eradication of lymphatic filariasis. As the Director of Research and Dean of Graduate Studies for St. George’s University, Dr. Macpherson is also pleased that St. George’s University has been selected as the regional post graduate institute to facilitate this training program.

Published on 07/19/2004