New Zealand Anatomy Conference Examines Impact of “Stethoscope of the Future”

A foundation component of medical education for every clinician, anatomy has recently emerged in the practice of ultrasound technology. Together, they have been called “the stethoscope of the future,” not only in a clinical setting but in the classroom.

For nearly a decade, Dr. Marios Loukas, Dean of Basic Sciences at St. George’s University, has spearheaded its implementation at SGU. As a keynote speaker at the 2017 Australasian & New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists (ANZACA), held at the University of Auckland from December 4-6, Dr. Loukas outlined how and why ultrasound has become an integral part of the St. George’s University curriculum.

“We’ve invested a lot in ultrasound training and we’re really ahead of the curve,” Dr. Loukas said. “As more and more schools are teaching it, it’s important that we explain how we did it, why it’s proven beneficial, some problems that we’ve faced, and how we have sorted it out.”

Ultrasound has been a platform for Dr. Loukas at past conferences, including the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) conference held in Grenada in 2012, after which several attendees obtained hands-on experience utilized SGU’s expansive ultrasound technology during a one-day postgraduate course on the True Blue campus. Dr. Loukas was appointed President of the AACA in 2017.

In New Zealand, he was joined in his presentation by Dr. Anne Agur, a Professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto and Past President of the AACA; and Dr. Brion Benninger, Executive Director of the Medical Anatomy Center at Western University of Health Sciences in Oregon.

“It was a nice balance,” said Dr. Loukas. “I was able to explain the dean perspective, including our objectives, milestones, and competencies, Dr. Agur provided the health allied sciences angle, and Dr. Benninger showed how ultrasound is integrated into his anatomy course.”

In addition, Dr. James Coey, Associate Course Director for Human Gross and Developmental Anatomy at Northumbria University, and Dr. Sara Sulaiman, Senior Lecturer in Anatomy at NU, were presented with an award for their research on how anatomy instruction across the globe, and what is the most effective way to teach the subject.

“It is imperative to drive our practice by evidence, communicate and collaborate with other medical educators to create an approach fit for today’s requirements and challenges,” Dr. Sulaiman said. “We are very thrilled having received this recognition from an esteemed organization such as ANZACA and we hope that our results and suggestions would drive further discussion and collaboration among anatomy educators.”

Earlier in 2017, Drs. Coey and Sulaiman were recognized for their work by the Anatomical Society of South Africa. In addition, second-year SGU student Jenna Kroeker was recognized by the best clinical anatomy poster presentation at the American Association of Clinical Anatomy annual meeting.

– Brett Mauser