St. George’s University Celebrates 40 Years of Excellence in International Education

St. George’s University’s highly anticipated 40th anniversary celebration kicked off with a weekend of festivities for which all those who helped author its incredible story—everyone from the faculty and staff to its more than 17,000 graduates — were invited.

SGU’s impact on health care, veterinary medicine, business, and many other fields has been felt both near and far. Close to home, SGU hasplayed and continues to play a large role in transforming the country of Grenada. In addition to contributing millions of dollars to the country’s economy, it is also one of the largest employers of Grenadians on the island, second only to the Government of Grenada. Similarly, SGU is also responsible for transforming education in the region, offering a tertiary education opportunity that has resulted in 1,200 Grenadian alumni, with more than 200 MDs.

Beyond the Isle of Spice, St. George’s University has graduated more than 14,000 physicians and over 1,200 veterinarians, helping to address doctor shortages in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Dr. G. Richard Olds, who hopes to continue that proud tradition as the University’s inaugural President, welcomed family, friends, and colleagues to a special investiture ceremony at Patrick F. Adams Hall during kickoff weekend. Attendees included Grenada’s Governor General, Dame Cecile La Grenade, Prime Minister Dr. the Right Honorable Keith Mitchell, Baroness Howells of St. David’s, founding members of SGU, parliamentarians, and diplomats. They included Dr. Timothy White, Chancellor, California State University, who delivered the evening’s keynote address, expressing that, in Dr. Olds, SGU had chosen the right person to lead it into the future.

With more than 70 percent of SGU doctors having gone on to practice primary care, many in areas of need, during his address, Dr. Olds reinforced his and the University’s commitment to addressing the primary care shortage and maldistribution of doctors in the US and worldwide.

“I feel privileged to lead St. George’s University at a time when we are doing more than ever to address the shortage of doctors worldwide,” Dr. Olds said. “Our graduates are fulfilling SGU’s mission to shape the future of our world – especially in communities worldwide that most need quality health care.”

SGU also welcomed back members of its charter class who started class at St. George’s University School of Medicine on January 17, 1977. They joined longtime administrators, faculty, and staff, including retired bus driver, Whitley Courtney, the University’s first-ever employee, at a special Founders Dinner in L’Anse aux Epines hosted by Chancellor Charles R. Modica, one of four of SGU’s founders. Other events included a Charity 5K Fun Run, for which more than 100 runners raced from Founders Library to the Grand Anse campus, tours of the True Blue campus, and a library archive exhibition.

Kickoff weekend festivities were punctuated by a Parade of Nations, for which more than 1,000 students, faculty, and staff celebrated SGU’s cultural diversity. In its 40 years, the University has welcomed individuals from more than 140 countries, and to celebrate, parade participants wore their national colors and waved flags of their native countries on their way through lower campus.

 

Kickoff weekend was only the beginning to a yearlong celebration of SGU’s 40 years. For more information and to register, visit www.sgu.edu/beyond40.

St. George’s University Formally Invests Dr. G. Richard Olds as President

Yesterday, St. George’s University formally marked Dr. G. Richard Olds’s appointment as President in an investiture ceremony, a highlight of the university’s 40th anniversary celebration.

“I feel privileged to lead St. George’s at a time when we are doing more than ever to address the shortage of doctors worldwide,” Olds said. “Our graduates are fulfilling St. George’s mission to shape the future of our world — especially in communities worldwide that most need quality health care.”

Co-founder Patrick F. Adams, Baroness Howells of St. Davids, Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell, Founding Chancellor Dr. Charles R. Modica, President & CEO Dr. G. Richard Olds, and California State University Chancellor Dr. Timothy White.

Investiture is a centuries-old academic tradition wherein a new university president receives the symbols of the office. Dr. Olds was appointed President of St. George’s in August 2015.

The Chancellor of the California State University system, Dr. Timothy White, also spoke during the investiture ceremony. He applauded St. George’s for expanding access to medical education among historically underrepresented minorities and recruiting a geographically, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse student body.

Dr. White was previously chancellor of the University of California, Riverside, where he worked with Dr. Olds to establish the university’s School of Medicine, the first LCME-accredited medical school in California in more than four decades. As its founding dean, Dr. Olds focused on addressing the shortage of primary care physicians in the school’s backyard, California’s Inland Empire, where there are only 120 physicians per 100,000 people. That’s 38 percent fewer than the state average.

Dr. Olds has carried that same passion for serving the needy to St. George’s, which is already the largest provider of new doctors to the U.S. healthcare system. Under Dr. Olds’s leadership, St. George’s has expanded several scholarship initiatives that encourage students to work in underserved areas, including the CityDoctors program and the Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program.

“Over our next 40 years and beyond, St. George’s will continue to expand opportunity to more students from geographically, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds — because they are the ones who will make a difference,” said Dr. Olds. “Whether they’re filling the global need for high-quality providers of primary care or solving public health crises, I am excited to see the impact that our students will have on the world.”

Published on 1/16/17

St. George’s University Adds Borrego Health to Clinical Network

St. George’s University’s network of clinical affiliates recently welcomed Borrego Community Health Foundation (BCHF), a non-profit Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) based in southern California. Starting in 2017, SGU clinical students can complete their family medicine rotations at the Cathedral City Health Center in Cathedral City, California. Borrego Health joins a family of more than […]

SAS Alum Outlines Coral Reef Restoration Program During Prince Harry Visit to Grenada

An alumnus of St. George’s University School of Arts and Sciences was part of a day-long welcoming party for Prince Henry of Wales – Prince Harry – during his visit to Grenada on November 28.

For a glass-bottomed boat tour in Grand Anse Bay, His Royal Highness was accompanied by Kerricia Hobson, BSc SGU ’08, Project Manager in the Environment Division in Grenada’s Ministry of Education, Human Resource Development, and the Environment. One of few individuals aboard the charter boat, Ms. Hobson explained the Grenada Coastal Ecosystem-Based Adaptation (EBA) Project, which is designed to reinforce deteriorating reef structures in Grenada and Carriacou through the creation and maintenance of coral nurseries.

She and Prince Harry observed five of the program’s divers, or “gardeners,” assess and clean the nurseries, tasks that will have many long-term environmental and sociological benefits to Grenada.

“Prince Harry was impressed and pledged to be a voice to help raise awareness about the importance of coral reefs,” Ms. Hobson said. “Coral reefs produce the sand on our beautiful beaches, and they’re also important for our tourism and fisheries industries. To restore them, coastal ecosystems have proven to be less costly to implement and a better fit than hard infrastructures such as seawalls.”

The EBA program is run jointly with the Government of Grenada and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), and is the first such project in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS). Since the program’s launch last year, EBA Project personnel, including another SGU grad, Leyana Romain, BSc SGU ’14, have constructed and overseen two nurseries off the coasts of Grenada and Carriacou. As a result of their efforts, nearly 2,000 reef fragments have matured and been installed on existing structures. Ms. Hobson and Ms. Romain are seeking additional funding that will allow them to reach their goal of planting upward of 10,000 fragments in the next 3-5 years.

Following his visit, His Royal Highness left a note that read, “Globally, 75% of coral reefs are under threat from overfishing, habitat destruction, pollution and acidification of the sea due to climate change. It is fantastic to see Grenada doing their bit for their surrounding ocean and coral reefs. We must protect the things that give us so much.”

Ms. Hobson described her conversation with Prince Harry as surreal. “He asked a number of questions and showed that he’s knowledgeable about our work and the issue of coastal preservation,” Ms. Hobson said. “For a while, I forgot that I was talking to His Royal Highness. He didn’t act like he was royalty; he acted like a person who was genuinely interested in the work we were doing.”

Jason Roberts, awarded an honorary doctorate from SGU in May 2016, meets with Prince Harry at Queens Park, Grenada.

Jason Roberts, awarded an honorary doctorate from SGU in May 2016, meets with Prince Harry at Queens Park, Grenada.

Prince Harry represented Queen Elizabeth II in his visit to Grenada, which included a royal welcome at Maurice Bishop International Airport, as well as sporting events at Queens Park Grounds. Prince Harry visited with members of the Jason Roberts Foundation, who launched the Youth in Action initiative to help improve the wellbeing and lifestyle of Grenada youth. Mr. Roberts, a former Premier League and Grenada National Team football player, was honored with an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters by SGU’s School of Graduate Studies in May 2016 for his longtime work on behalf of disabled children in Grenada through the Foundation.

Prince Harry’s visit was part of a 15-day tour of the Caribbean that also included stops in Antigua, Barbados, Barbuda, Guyana, Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Kitts and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Published 12/6/2016

St. George’s University SVM Dean Named to AAVMC Board

The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) has named Dr. Timothy Ogilvie, St. George’s University’s Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, to its Board of Directors and Governance. Dr. Ogilvie will serve as Region IV At-Large Director, representing  AVMA Council on Education-accredited veterinary medical schools in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Europe.

Dr. Tim Ogilvie“I take great pride in representing these schools, especially SGU,” said Dr. Ogilvie. “I am honored to be selected. It’s a great opportunity for me to encourage programming at AAVMC that builds upon our strengths and that our members can take advantage of. It’s also very valuable for a Dean to get exposed to new ideas and to work with colleagues who can lend their support when facing various challenges.”

The AAVMC was formed in 1966 by the deans of the 18 US and three Canadian veterinary colleges to promote and protect the health and welfare of animals, people and the environment by generating new knowledge and preparing the high-quality veterinary workforce needed to meet continually changing societal demands for veterinary expertise.

Today, the AAVMC coordinates the affairs of all 30 US veterinary medical colleges, all five Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine, eight US departments of veterinary science, eight US departments of comparative medicine, eight international veterinary schools, three veterinary medical education organizations, and four affiliate international veterinary schools. The association represents more than 4,000 faculty, 5,000 staff, 10,000 veterinary students, and 3,000 graduate students at these institutions.

“This appointment not only helps to build SGU’s brand, credibility, and reputation; it also allows me to help in making sure that the AAVMC, as an organization for the colleges of veterinary medicine, continues to think about students first,” stated Dr. Ogilvie. “Our colleges are training grounds for veterinary medical students so it has to be a student-centered program that we deliver. We must ensure that we think of the deeper mission of education.

“One of the goals of the AAVMC is to help promote wider accreditation,” he added. “Today, we are on the cusp of getting more global standards in place. We at SGU are positioned to understand well the international competencies for veterinarians, and this allows me to continue to push the agenda forward for quality assessment and quality assurances for the provision of educational programs for veterinary students.”

Dr. Ogilvie was appointed Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine in 2014 after spending six years as a Visiting Professor in the SVM. For his career, he was a founding faculty member of Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC) following his appointment as the Director of the Animal Industry Services branch within the Prince Edward Island Department of Agriculture and Forestry. Dr. Ogilvie later served as Chair of the AVC’s Department of Health Management (1990-1998) and Acting Dean (1998-1999), while also co-directing AVC’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The AVC Vet Camp was renamed the Dr. Tim Ogilvie AVC Vet Camp in 2009 and recently was acknowledged by the Canadian Council for the Advancement of Education as the best community outreach program in the country.

Published on 11/29/16

St. George’s University and Botswana Demonstrate Commitment to Reducing the Medical Brain Drain

Medical Doctors, Doctors of Veterinary Medicine and Public Health Graduates Celebrated at Gaborone Ceremony

Thirty-five Batswana graduates from St George’s University, the centre of international education on the Caribbean island of Grenada, will celebrate their achievement at the commencement ceremony on Saturday, 19 November at the Botswana TraveLodge in the country’s capital city.

botswana

This is the second time that such a graduation ceremony has been held outside the United States in the 40 year history of St George’s University. The first occasion was in 2012, also in Gaborone. The Batswana students have graduated from St George’s University schools of medicine, veterinary medicine, and the graduate studies programme.

“We are very pleased to be honouring the hard work of these graduates and now expect them to make a major contribution to medical and other professional services in their own country”, commented Dr G Richard Olds, the President and Chief Executive Officer of St George’s University.

“We have had a long and successful relationship with the University of Botswana’s medical school and with the Ministries of Education and Health. With four doctors for every 10,000 people in Botswana, it is vital that the medical doctor graduates in particular help to redress the brain drain which has resulted in 800 Batswana doctors working overseas or outside their own country”.

Dr Olds pointed out that Botswana had graduated more MD students through St George’s University than any African country, apart from Nigeria. “Botswana and St George’s University have produced 97 MD graduates, with 22 students still working for their degrees at our university”, he added. “We believe that Botswana has the potential to become a major medical hub for the region”.

The commencement ceremony held later this month will celebrate the entrance of the Batswana graduands into the country’s workforce and honour St George’s University’s Batswana alumni who are already working towards better health care delivery in Botswana. It will also acknowledge the strong relationship between St George’s University and the government, partner institutions and the people of Botswana.

Published on 11/18/16

Professor Ian McConnell Delivers Annual Keith B. Taylor Memorial/WINDREF Lecture at St. George’s University

Professor Ian McConnell, most recognized for his fundamental discoveries on the immune system, drew upon his distinguished career in research while delivering the Keith B. Taylor Memorial/WINDREF Lecture at Bourne Hall on November 8. His address, titled “One Health: Successes and Opportunities,” focused on the immunology of infectious diseases of both animals and man, and was delivered to an audience of more than 1,100 faculty, staff, community members, and online viewers.

ian-mcconnell-lecture

Dr. McConnell is an Emeritus Professor of Veterinary Science and Director of Research at the University of Cambridge, England. One Health has been a theme of his extensive research and teaching, with particular emphasis on zoonotic diseases and genetic diseases of animals that have parallels with genetic diseases in man. In particular, his work is currently focused on the scientific basis of infectious diseases of animals and man and how they impact public health at a global level.

“One Health is a concept that has had a long history in both medical and veterinary science,” said Dr. McConnell. “It is an important and defining concept which recognizes the interconnectedness between medicine, veterinary medicine, epidemiology, and the biomedical and biological sciences. Public health, environmental health, and biodiversity all play in to the issues and concerns affecting the health of animals and man.”

ian-mcconnell-lectureAlthough One Health is a broad subject that covers many areas in veterinary medicine, human medicine, and biological sciences, Dr. McConnell chose to focus his lecture on two areas: global infectious diseases and comparative medicine. He used the examples of the eradication of rinderpest and rabies in animals in Europe to illustrate the successes and opportunities for One Health in global infectious diseases. For comparative medicine, he discussed the opportunities for translational research in man based on the repair of spinal cord injuries in dogs.

In addition to his professorship, Dr. McConnell is a Founder Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, the UKs foremost Academy of medical science. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE), and was elected to Fellowships of the Royal Society of Medicine, and Royal College of Pathologists’ on scientific merit. He is a Professorial Fellow in Veterinary Science of Darwin College Cambridge.

After he graduated in veterinary medicine from the University of Glasgow and in Natural Sciences (Pathology) from the University of Cambridge, he carried out his doctoral studies (PhD) in immunology in the laboratory of Professor Robin Coombs, one of the founding fathers of immunology, in the Department of Pathology at Cambridge. Professor McConnell also gave the 13th Annual Geoffrey H. Bourne Memorial Lecture at St. George’s University in 2007.

The Annual WINDREF and Keith B. Taylor Memorial Lecture, named after SGU’s second Vice Chancellor, has drawn the attention of numerous renowned presenters willing to share their expertise on topics such as climate change, health needs, and drug abuse and addictions. Past speakers at the lecture have included Dr. Robert C. Gallo, Director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, best known for his role in the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and Dr. Valentin Fuster, a renowned cardiologist who presented on the topic, “The Worldwide Challenge of Cardiovascular Disease.”

Published on 11/15/16

St. George’s University Provost Feels Right at Home

The new Provost at St. George’s University, Dr. Joseph Childers has received a warm Grenadian welcome upon his arrival. Although he is new to the island, the feeling he has is a familiar one.

childers-joseph“This has been very much like coming home for me,” Dr. Childers said. “Grenadian culture is, in many ways, similar to the Southern culture I grew up in. There is a certain friendliness, courtesy, and slight formality that everyone possesses. Grenadians also have an incredible joyousness – they love to laugh. I’ve found them to be upbeat, resilient, and proud, traits I very much recognize and respect.”

Appointed Provost in October 2016, Dr. Childers will oversee the University’s academic units, academic centers and initiatives, and student services, providing leadership for the planning, development, implementation, assessment, and improvement of all academic programs, policies, and supporting infrastructure for the Grenada campus. He assumed the Provost role from Allen Pensick, who has spent more than 30 years at SGU, including as Provost from 2004 to 2016. Dr. Pensick has stayed on as Provost Emeritus, assisting Dr. Childers with his transition.

“Dr. Pensick has been an invaluable resource,” Dr. Childers said. “He’s so well liked, so well respected, and is such a major part of the University’s history. In addition to being a gracious mentor, he’s a great person. I couldn’t have asked for better.”

Dr. Childers came to SGU after serving as Dean of the Graduate Division at University of California, Riverside (UCR) for eight years. During that time, UCR witnessed increases in graduate student diversity and student success, garnering national attention as an institutional model and for best practices.

“Having purview over an entire campus was instrumental in helping me get a sense of the specific issues facing different departments and disciplines,” Dr. Childers said. “Also, because I have taught at all levels, from freshmen to advanced graduate students and even faculty, I have learned to be mindful about how to present and to ensure that people come away with an understanding of the material. It is paramount that the audience feels the environment is safe for asking questions and communicating.”

At UCR, he worked alongside G. Richard Olds, then the Founding Dean of its School of Medicine and the current President and Chief Executive Officer at SGU. Together they helped create one of the US’s most diverse campuses, a trait it shares with SGU, which has drawn students from more than 140 countries.

“You cannot over value the importance of diversity on any campus,” Dr. Childers said. “If you’re always seeing and dealing with people just like yourself, you’re effectively living in a cocoon. It’s important to be able to deal with difference, to see the world from alternate perspectives, and to respect other cultures, especially if you’re going into a profession that demands that kind of open-mindedness and curiosity.”

The oldest of five children, Dr. Childers was born in north central Indiana but as an infant moved with his family to Bentonville, Arkansas, a farming community on the Missouri and Oklahoma border. He earned his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts from the University of Arkansas, and went on to obtain his Master of Philosophy and Doctor of Philosophy from Columbia University.

He then joined UCR as a Professor of English, a position he held for more than 25 years. Dr. Childers has also authored two books, co-edited two others, and published numerous articles and essays on a wide variety of topics. In addition to bringing his expertise and leadership to SGU, he is joined by his wife, Dr. Karen Pyke, a well known sociologist who is a visiting professor in the School of Arts and Sciences and who is consulting on the formation of an ombuds office for the campus.

In a short time, Dr. Childers has settled in at SGU, and he looks forward to using his background as an administrator and educator to create policies, procedures, and efficiencies that contribute to its development, both regionally and worldwide.

“Before it came on the radar for me as potential opportunity, I knew it was well respected for its medical education, but I didn’t know just how large of a role it has in the Caribbean,” Dr. Childers said. “St. George’s University is in position to become a comprehensive and truly premier international university. We are moving in that direction, and I’m tremendously excited to be a part of the University’s advancement.”

Published on 11/14/16

St. George’s University Small Animal Clinic Obtains AAHA Accreditation

For more than 15 years, the St. George’s University Small Animal Clinic (SAC) has provided quality care for animals throughout Grenada. This month, the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) gave its stamp of approval, accrediting the SAC for two years, making it the second practice outside the United States and Canada to earn the distinction.

small animal clinic

Comprised of 10 clinicians and 15 support staff, the Small Animal Clinic is open year-round and around the clock, welcoming between 5,000 and 7,000 patients for wellness visits, emergencies, and surgeries. In addition, the SAC has been a clinical training venue for more than 1,200 School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) graduates.

“Accreditation proves that we are practicing a standard of excellence at the Small Animal Clinic,” said Dr. Christina Fernandez, DVM SGU ’07, Immediate Past Director of the SAC and an SVM Associate Professor in Emergency Critical Care. “The AAHA assessed what we’re teaching our students, providing for our clients, and how we work together as a business. On all of these fronts, we showed that we are doing a really good job.”

“AAHA accreditation provides an enhanced and enriched learning environment for students,” added Dr. Tim Ogilvie, Dean, St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine. “It is a point of pride for clinicians and staff, and it is a measure of quality and service focus for clients comparable to the best standards of care for animal patients.”

The SAC team began working toward AAHA accreditation in 2015, studying their efficiency of the practice, changing protocols, and updating the facility with state-of-the-art equipment. Earlier this month, an AAHA representative visited Grenada to measure the clinic on more than 900 mandatory and additional standards. The SAC attained accreditation for two years, and will be evaluated for potential three-year re-accreditation in 2018. According to the AAHA, only 12 to 15 percent of all veterinary practices in the US are accredited.

Dr. Wayne Sylvester, a longtime SVM Associate Professor and SAC Clinician, assumed the role of Interim Director, taking over for Dr. Fernandez on July 1.

“At the Small Animal Clinic, we are constantly striving to improve the standard of veterinary practice while optimizing the delivery of our services to our patients, clients and the community,” Dr. Sylvester said. “AAHA accreditation is a monumental accomplishment. It is a clear demonstration of the dedication and professionalism of our team, and we will continue to maintain the highest possible standards.”

For Dr. Fernandez, accreditation is only the latest feather in the clinic’s cap. She has witnessed tremendous improvements at the SAC since arriving at SGU as a student in 2003. “The clinic has changed so much, and the quality of medicine and teaching that the faculty offers is really outstanding at this point,” Dr. Fernandez said.

It has not only provided care and clinical training for SGU students but it has shifted Grenadians’ perspective of pet ownership. “Years ago, pets were considered property – they had a job to do, like to guard property or hunt,” Dr. Fernandez said. “Now we’re seeing more and more Grenadians who are proud of their animals. They bring their pets in for preventive care as opposed to just when they’re sick. They’re part of the family now.”

Published on 10/18/16

SGU Alumnus Raises the Standard for Radiology in Grenada

As part of the St. George’s University 12 Degrees North program, Dr. Randy Becker, MD SGU ’00, has returned to his alma mater each of the past seven years to offer free clinics and radiology training at the General Hospital. This fall, Dr. Becker has taken his commitment one step further with the introduction of the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), providing an economical means of storing, archiving, and transmitting digital medical images like X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs.

sgu-alumnus-raises-the-standard-for-radiology-in-grenada

The donation was facilitated by RadNet Comprehensive Radiology Solutions, which provides PACS services for Dr. Becker’s practices in Maryland, and has an estimated value of US $200,000. With the new technology, Dr. Linwald Fleary, MD SGU ‘97, the General Hospital’s only radiologist, can access and assess images from any digital radiology center in Grenada on the PACS system. In addition to this time-saving benefit, and more accurate assessments, radiologists worldwide can join Grenada’s network to offer assistance and even second opinions.

“This is a tremendous milestone for radiology in Grenada,” said Brendon LaGrenade, Interim Vice Provost of Institutional Advancement at SGU. “It is a heartwarming example of what can happen when one person sees beyond a challenge to a possibility, and puts their efforts into making that possibility a reality. Dr. Becker is that special person who saw the need and didn’t let the size of the project stop him. He returned to Grenada in various supportive capacities since shortly after his graduation, and since then has been a central figure in bringing this huge project to fruition in Grenada.”

With SGU’s help, the radiology department at General Hospital had been upgraded to a cutting-edge, digitally equipped facility some years ago. However, the new capability to produce high-quality radiology images created the need to export these images to a radiologist without compromising quality or accuracy.

“Implementing the PACS system was the next necessary step in bringing the standard of radiology in Grenada up to what it needs to be,” said Mr. LaGrenade. “With this new supporting technology, the full effectiveness of the imaging equipment at the General Hospital can be achieved.”

After identifying the need for PACS, Dr. Becker reached out to RadNet. Mr. Ranjan Jayanathan, Chief Information Officer at RadNet, and his team were so touched by Dr. Becker’s work and philanthropy in health care development in Grenada that they agreed to waive all charges other than some hardware, and a fee for system maintenance.
On September 12, Dr. Becker, along with Ralph Stubenrauch, Clinical Applications Manager, and Will Page, Integrations Manager at RadNet, visited Grenada and successfully installed PACS at the General Hospital, University Health Services at SGU, and Princess Alice Hospital, which is currently being upgraded to a digital system. Future plans are to support all digitally capable centers in Grenada who wish to come on board with PACS.

Published on 10/12/16