SOM Alumni Association CME Examines the Art of Medicine

The science of medicine has produced miracles in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Yet, it is the art of medicine which remains the medium through which illness and suffering are relieved. This was the focus at this spring’s School of Medicine Alumni Association (SOMAA) continuing medical education conference in Grenada.

Titled “The Art of Medicine,” the four-day conference was held in association with the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). It featured prominent SOM alumni and faculty presenters who covered an array of topics such as new strategies and treatment for atrial fibrillation, the downside of mechanical ventilation, a discussion on high flow oxygen therapy, and how to use ultrasound to improve patient safety.

“Despite the enormous advances in the science of medicine, being a physician also entails the art of medicine—the interpersonal contact between patient and physician which remains a keystone of medical care,” said SOMAA President Bruce Bonanno, MD SGU ’83. “This conference provides not only education for physicians and other health care professionals but a way for our alumni to also get back to the beautiful island of Grenada to rekindle their love for the school, the people, and the island.”

For Jack Davidoff, MD SGU ’88, and his wife Tracey Davidoff neé Quail, MD SGU ’90, this was their second time returning to Grenada since earning their medical degrees at St. George’s University almost three decades ago. After attending last year’s CME held as part of SGU’s 40th anniversary celebrations, the couple was so impressed with the advances made at the University, they felt compelled to return again this year.

“Our first visit back last year was very emotional for us. It’s not just the school that gave us our start but it’s also the people that welcomed us to their island,” commented Dr. Jack Davidoff, an emergency medicine physician. “The True Blue campus is outstanding. Our three daughters are all in college and, of all the college campuses we’ve visited in the US, nothing compares to SGU.”

“With our second visit, we wanted to focus more on giving back in a teaching way,” said Dr. Tracey Davidoff, Vice President of the College of Urgent Care Medicine. “My husband has a vision of improving emergency medical services in Grenada and we wanted to make some connections on island and figure out the best way to do that.”

The 2nd annual SOMAA CME grew in participation since last year with more than 60 attendees, 50 of whom were SGU alumni, as well as 14 Grenadian physicians who practice locally. Additionally, their time in Grenada wasn’t only about lectures and education, the SOMAA provided plenty of opportunities to experience a taste of culture and hospitality on the island many called home during their studies. The group enjoyed a sightseeing tour of Grenada’s natural beauty; lunch at Belmont Estate, a fully functional and historic plantation; a shopping tour of Grenada’s capital, St. George’s; a Catamaran VIP day cruise including snorkeling and a visit to the Underwater Sculpture Park and Hog Island; and a closing sunset dinner at Louis and Marion Modica Hall.

“CME conferences present an opportunity for our graduates to come back to the island to reunite with classmates, friends, faculty and the community, and at the same time partake in a valuable and often needed continuing education component for their careers,” stated Brendon La Grenade, Vice Provost for Institutional Advancement, SGU. “CMEs are usually conducted in fun places, and SGU and Grenada offer exceptional facilities and a stellar location to achieve just that.”

– Ray-Donna Peters

Clean Sweep for Hillsborough Secondary School at SGU Knowledge Bowl

Holding the record for both the most victories and the only institution to three-peat in the SGU Knowledge Bowl competition, the pressure to win was on for Presentation Brothers College (PBC). However, finals newcomer Hillsborough Secondary School (HSS) dominated this season, defeating the five-time champion and earning their first-ever win.

The final match held at SGU’s Charter Hall on April 14, seemed like a battle between David and Goliath as the winningest team in the secondary school competition, PBC, was the crowd favorite to win. Nevertheless, it was the underdog HSS, who had not lost a single match throughout the entire season that came out on top. With only a handful of supporters in the audience but hundreds more cheering them on from Grenada’s sister island, Carriacou, HSS continued its dominance, remaining undefeated in Season 13.

“Over the last 13 years, this competition has been embraced by the schools, corporate Grenada, and the general public. There have been continuous improvements to ensure that this important feature of the academic calendar gets the respect that it deserves,” stated Colin Dowe, Associate Dean of Enrollment Planning, SGU. “SGU Knowledge Bowl has cemented itself within the Grenadian community, and along with the involvement of our corporate partners, who play a key role in its success, SGU Knowledge Bowl is testimony to our shared commitment to academic success and youth development in general.”

For its school, the HSS team was presented with the coveted Knowledge Bowl Challenge trophy and awarded $15,000 from St. George’s University. Additionally, each of the five team members—Lené Mitchell, Roshaun Lendore, Anthony Matherson, Teja Patrice, and Cristel Belmar—received a laptop and six months complimentary broadband service from FLOW, along with $500 in a Super Starter Investment Plan from Grenada Co-operative Bank, a certificate of distinction and a supply of Ribena from Geo F. Huggins. Their coaches were awarded a laptop and six months complimentary broadband service from FLOW, $500 in a Super Starter Investment Plan from Grenada Co-operative Bank and each received a two-night stay for two at Spice Isle Beach Resort or Maca Bana Resort.

SGU Knowledge Bowl remains a source of great anticipation, garnering huge support each year as students, faculty, and fans come out to cheer for their favorite teams. The high-profile quiz competition continues to encourage and promote friendly competition between Grenada’s secondary schools, while also serving as an excellent preparatory tool for their CSEC exams. In addition to primary sponsorships from St. George’s University and FLOW, local businesses Grenada Co-operative Bank, George F. Huggins, and Glenelg Spring Water sponsor the SGU Knowledge Bowl, which is regarded as the “Intercol of Academia.”

– Ray-Donna Peters

Veterinary Anesthesia Leaders From Around the World Descend on Grenada for AVA Meeting

St. George’s University served as the center of a worldwide veterinary anesthesia discussion as more than 100 veterinary experts traveled to Grenada for the semi-annual Association of Veterinary Anesthetists (AVA) conference. Customarily held in Europe where the organization was founded, the Spring 2018 meeting however marked the first time in the organization’s history that the conference was held in the Caribbean.

“We are very proud to be sponsoring this congress here in Grenada. It’s a wonderful opportunity to showcase not only SGU but also our beautiful island,” said Dr. Neil Olson, Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. “St. George’s provides the perfect platform for members of the veterinary anesthesia community to collaborate and offers great levels of exposure to different veterinary professionals from around the world. Hosting the AVA group also speaks to the quality of our vet school and to our presence throughout the globe.”

Themed “Anesthesia and Analgesia—Myths and Misconceptions,” the three-day conference featured lectures and abstract sessions from a wide range of delegates. Presentations included “Evaluating recovery of horses from anesthesia: moving beyond the subjective” by Dr. Stuart Clark-Price, Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine; “Safe anesthesia in young children: what really matters” by Prof. Markus Weiss, Anesthesiologist-in-Chief, University Children’s Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland; and “Pain in Mice and Man: Ironic Adventures in Translation” by Dr. Jeffrey Mogil, Canada Research Chair in the Genetics of Pain at McGill University.

“I’m increasingly speaking at veterinary meetings I presume because of the Mouse Grimace Scale, which has gotten me the attention of the veterinary research world,” stated Dr. Mogil. “Although most of my talks are to a human anesthesiologist audience, I enjoy even more speaking to veterinary groups than neurologists, psychologists, and anesthesiologists. This is because I get to see firsthand how interested people in other research communities are to what I study, and the questions and feedback are always completely different and usually more useful than what I get from the standard audiences.

“Additionally, this is also a lovely opportunity for me to branch out, and on the other hand, I get to give a veterinary audience like this something that is beyond the usual affair and hopefully useful for their thinking as well.”

Dr. Karin Kalchofner Guerrero, Associate Professor in Veterinary Anesthesia at St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine, served as Chair of the Local Organizing Committee, working diligently to arrange the meeting for which SGU and the Radisson Grenada Beach Resort in Grand Anse served as hosts.

“We are extremely pleased with the success of this event, which proved to be beneficial for both the AVA and SGU,” commented Dr. Guerrero. “We received plenty of positive feedback, with attendees complimenting our scientific program, the social events and of course the beauty and hospitality of Grenada. Additionally, many of our European participants were first-time visitors to Grenada and the Caribbean, therefore we hosted the first two days of the meeting on the SGU campus, giving them a chance to visit our picturesque University’s grounds and to interact with faculty, staff, and students.”

Usually convening in such locations as Paris, France; Helsinki, Finland; and most recently in Berlin, Germany, the AVA meeting provides a venue for veterinary interns, residents, and practitioners to exchange ideas, expand their knowledge, and develop new skills. The AVA Autumn 2018 meeting will be the World Congress of Veterinary Anesthesiology (WCVA), which takes place every three years and is scheduled for Venice, Italy, followed by the Spring 2019 meeting to be held in Bristol, United Kingdom.

– Ray-Donna Peters

Wildlife Conservationist Envisions a Future for Tigers in Northeast Asia

At present, the Siberian tiger is at the tipping point for its recovery or extinction, this according to Dr. Dale Miquelle, Director for the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Russia Program. With an estimated 3,500 tigers remaining in the world today, the goal of conservationists is to double that number by 2020, while the cost of inaction would mean their extinction by 2040.

In his recent lecture at St. George’s University, titled, “Dreaming of Donuts: A vision of tiger conservation in northeast Asia”, Dr. Miquelle pointed to poaching, loss of prey, and habitat loss/degradation as the primary reasons for the tiger’s decline. However, Dr. Miquelle believes that the Siberian tiger can be saved, detailing a plan for tiger conservation in northeast Asia.

“First, we should let ‘good’ science drive policy decisions, then secure source sites or protected areas for tigers, as well as secure habitat/populations outside of these protected areas because they represent the majority of tiger habitat,” advised Dr. Miquelle. “We also need to resolve tiger-human conflicts—these conflicts between people and tigers remove animals from the wild and turn public opinion against tigers.”

“Lastly, we need to expand tiger habitat/tiger distribution, and train the next generation of conservationists,” added Dr. Miquelle. “In the Russian Far East and northeast China, there are very few young biologists/conservationists. In Russia especially, the next generation is missing. Hence, we seek to identify, support, and train the next generation of specialists, and provide them stimuli to stay involved.”

Dr. Dale Miquelle was invited to the True Blue campus by the Department of Biology, Ecology and Conservation in the School of Arts and Sciences (SAS). Dr. Andrea Easter-Pilcher, Interim Dean of SAS, met Dr. Miquelle during a two-month sabbatical trip to Siberia and the Russian Far East as Visiting Scientists in 2015. Housed for five weeks in the WCS house in the small village of Terney on the Sea of Japan, she spent time in the field with Dr. Miquelle and other Siberian tiger, leopard, and Musk deer biologists at this biosphere reserve, which is the last stronghold for the Siberian tigers.

“We are preparing our Marine, Wildlife and Conservation Biology students for work on the global stage, as our graduates hail from Grenada, other Caribbean countries, the US, Canada, and Europe,” stated Dr. Easter-Pilcher. “Likewise, Dr. Miquelle knows how to succeed on that level, by leveraging funds, building local professional capacity, and implementing data-driven programs, all in difficult international political environments.

“Hosting someone of Dr. Miquelle’s caliber, in the wildlife and conservation biology sciences, is a testament to SGU’s intellectual breadth and global reach and is a tremendous benefit for our students and the SGU community,” she continued. “We were indeed fortunate to have Dr. Miquelle with us here at SGU.”

Trained as a biologist at Yale, University of Minnesota, and University of Idaho, Dr. Miquelle focused on moose in Minnesota and Alaska for his degrees. However, working for a year on the Tiger Ecology Project in Chitwan National Park, Nepal, with a Smithsonian-led tiger research team changed his focus and cemented his interest in both international conservation efforts and large carnivore research. In 1992, he led the field team of a joint Russian-American Siberian Tiger Project, during which time he became a passionate conservationist, using science as a platform for policy change, working in both China and Russia to ensure a future for big cats.

Currently, Dr. Miquelle also serves as Coordinator for the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Tiger Program, coordinating research and conservation actions to protect large carnivores and the ecosystems upon which they depend, focusing mainly in northeast Asia.

– Ray-Donna Peters

St. George’s University Announces New Partnership with Essex County College

Officials from Essex County College in New Jersey join with SGU administrators following a signing ceremony in Grenada.

Today, St. George’s University and Essex County College celebrated the launch of a new medical education partnership. ECC will become the Caribbean medical school’s 22nd US academic partner.

“We are excited to open up this innovative path to medical school for Essex County College’s most motivated and passionate students,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “We look forward to helping talented ECC students pursue their dream of becoming a doctor sooner than they may have thought possible.”

The new partnership allows students to apply to a dual admission degree program, wherein they earn their undergraduate degree in Biology/Pre-Medicine at ECC and then proceed to SGU’s five-year medical program. Students complete their first three years of medical school in Grenada and then spend two years in clinical rotations at hospitals across the United States and United Kingdom.

Students interested in the dual admission program must submit a separate application when applying to ECC. Prior to being selected, students must complete an undergraduate interview with a committee composed of representatives from both Essex County College and St. George’s University.

To continue on to medical school, students must maintain a minimum 3.4 GPA at ECC and score within five points of the average MCAT score for SGU’s previous entering class. They must also obtain a faculty letter of recommendation.

Students currently studying Biology at Essex County College may submit applications for the program and will be reviewed individually upon recommendation by ECC.

“Students entering college with a clear desire to pursue careers in medicine should be rewarded for their enthusiasm and dedication,” Dr. Olds said. “Through this new partnership, we can help students chart their course toward a medical degree before they take their first course at Essex County College.”

SGU Marine and Wildlife Students Help Recovery Efforts in Dominica

Dominica—the first island hit by the full category-five force of Hurricane Maria last September—continues to call upon its Caribbean neighbors during its ongoing recovery efforts. Answering that call was a seven-member team from the Marine and Wildlife Department at St. George’s University. The group, comprised of two faculty lecturers and five students, spent 10 days in Dominica, lending its expertise in its post-hurricane ecology impact assessment of the country’s forest and endemic parrots, Amazona Imperialis and Amazona Arausiaca.

“As one might expect after a hurricane, the government’s resources are really stretched thin in regard to man power, so Dominica appreciates all the assistance it can get,” said Stephen Nimrod, lecturer at SGU. “Following a natural disaster, we now have the opportunity to document and measure the time it takes for forest regeneration and wildlife recovery. This is the kind of technical assistance that SGU was there to provide.”

Aiding the Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Parks, the SGU team conducted rapid assessment surveys while collecting quantitative data detailing the extent of the damage done by the hurricane. Additionally, the team documented the hurricane’s impact on Dominica’s flagship species, the Imperial Parrot. Most of the bird’s natural habitat had been destroyed, forcing it to leave the forest in search of food in the nearby villages.

“Our focus while there was on the regeneration of the forest and the conservation of the island’s native parrot,” added Mr. Nimrod. “The data collected will be analyzed and compiled into a comprehensive report together with real-time recommendations as a guide forward. This includes continuous monitoring of the rainforest and the change in behavior of the island’s endangered parrots in particular. We hope that by recording these lessons learned in Dominica, we can now create a network that will be beneficial to other islands going through the recovery process.”

Unsurprisingly, the mission was met with a few challenges. Much of Dominica’s population was left stranded without power, running water, or communications. The island was stripped of vegetation, and according to team leader Leon Radix, approximately 60 percent of its rainforests have vanished.

“Dominica markets itself as the Nature Island of the Caribbean so therefore its forest is one of its major resources,” stated Mr. Radix, lecturer at SGU. “However, following the passage of Hurricane Maria, as you can imagine, conditions on the ground are not good. Many vehicles were damaged and the road network is broken, making it time consuming for us to arrive at the various sites, which resulted in limited time for us to work in the field. Generally speaking, we can see that the island has been ravaged.”

“When we got there, it was clear that the people were still traumatized,” commented fourth-year marine and wildlife biology student Quincy Augustine. Yet, armed with their binoculars, field vests, and notebooks, the team quickly went to work conducting wildlife surveys and generating a post-hurricane impact assessment of the area in Dominica. “Overall, the trip was a really good experience,” added classmate Amonie Holas, also a fourth-year marine and wildlife biology student. “We got to apply the various skills and methods that we learned from our courses here at SGU into a professional setting, and working with different people from the same field was really inspiring.”

Funded by the Office of the Dean within St. George’s University School of Arts and Sciences, GAEA Conservation and EC $4,000 in funds raised by Education Conservation Outreach (ECO), the Dominica outreach provided an opportunity for SGU students to gain invaluable real-life experience with wildlife rescue work and a glimpse into their future careers in conservation.

“Being a part of the outreach in Dominica will serve as both hands-on training in the field and will also elevate the status of our students, especially when sending out their resumes,” said Dr. Andrea Easter-Pilcher, Interim Dean, School of Arts and Sciences, SGU. “Highlighting that they were involved with the recovery efforts on the ground will be extremely beneficial for them. SGU had a big role to play in that. The fact that the University provides funding for student development speaks volumes about its commitment to the international education of its students.”

– Ray-Donna Peters

St. George’s University Announces New Jersey CityDoctors Scholarship Recipients

St. George’s University School of Medicine has announced that it has awarded CityDoctors Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center Scholarships to eight applicants from New Jersey over the last two years. In August 2016, Ryan Zahn, Andrew Bradshaw, Eileen Alvarez, and Santiago Minaya were each awarded a scholarship and are in the Class of 2020. The 2017-2018 scholarships were awarded to Timothy Muia, Larissa Tavares, Jeris Abuhouran, and Michael Dragone. These recent recipients are currently enrolled and are in the Classes of 2021 and 2022.

“We are proud to provide financial assistance to these talented New Jerseyans who are committed to launching their medical careers in high-need urban areas,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “This scholarship program allows students who might otherwise be unable to afford medical school to serve their communities as physicians.”

John Theurer Cancer Center Lobby

Through the CityDoctors program, St. George’s University will cover 50 percent of tuition for each of the eight scholarship winners. All eight are from Bergen County or affiliated with Hackensack University Medical Center and have expressed interest in returning to the area to practice. New Jersey needs them—by 2020, the state will be short 3,000 primary care physicians.

CityDoctors Hackensack University Medical Center Scholarships are available to students who have been accepted to St. George’s University School of Medicine and either live in Bergen County or have a professional connection to Hackensack University Medical Center. Applicants must write a 500-word essay explaining why their academic record, financial need, or leadership and service experience make them strong candidates. St. George’s University has awarded these scholarships since 2012.

“This unique agreement with St. George’s University allows us to help the Garden State’s best and brightest begin their professional lives in their home state,” Jeffrey R. Boscamp, MD, Associate Dean of Medical Education Continuum, Seton Hall-Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, said. “I am excited to see what great things these budding doctors accomplish.”

St. George’s University Graduates Obtain More than 900 First Year Residency Positions

St. George's University, A Caribbean Medical School, has a successful Match Day 2018

901 students and graduates from St. George’s University School of Medicine matched with residency programs across the United States. This number is likely to go up in the next few weeks as SGU grads get residencies post-Match and outside of the Match.

86% of eligible SGU graduates obtained a PGY1 residency position, compared to 84% at this time last year. By the summer of 2017, 93% of SGU’s eligible US 2017 graduates had obtained a PGY1 position.

The available residency positions are increasing in the US. The 2018 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) saw a 4.8% increase over 2017 with 1,383 more PGY1 positions—quelling fears that residencies are becoming unavailable. The available residencies have been growing for 16 consecutive years; more than 9,500 have been added since 2002.

The Match rates of international medical graduates (IMGs) going through the NRMP’s Match were the highest in 25 years—56.5% matched, up from 53.4% last year. For US citizen IMGs, the rate was 57.1%. This percentage has risen 13 of the last 15 years. It should be noted that SGU’s US 2018 current residency obtainment rate for eligible current-year graduates for PGY1 positions—in and out of the Match—is 87%.

St. George’s University students obtained residencies in programs across 46 US states and the District of Columbia will be entering 16 different medical specialties. The most popular specialties among SGU’s newly minted residents were internal medicine and family medicine, two primary care fields sorely needing reinforcements. The United States will face a shortage of up to 31,000 primary care physicians by 2025. In addition, grads matched into such specialties as anesthesiology, emergency medicine, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, surgery, and urology.

The latest group of St. George’s-trained residents joins a cohort of over 15,000 alumni who have gone on to practice in all 50 states. SGU is the number one provider of doctors in first-year residencies on the United States, and in 2016, St. George’s University ranked as the fourth largest source of doctors for the entire US workforce.

SGU and Ramaiah Group of Institutions Create Pathway Program for Indian Students

Ramaiah Group of Institutions Bangalore India signs Memorandum of Understanding with St. George’s University

A Memorandum of Understanding has been signed between the Ramaiah Group of Institutions, Bangalore, India (RMC), and St. George’s University. The signing took place during a ceremony at Ramaiah Medical College on March 20, and marked the beginning of a new international relationship between the two institutions. The purpose of the agreement is to develop academic and educational cooperation, and to promote mutual understanding between Ramaiah and SGU.

The two institutions have agreed to develop collaborative activities in academic areas of mutual interest, paving the way for students of Ramiaiah to study at SGU in future. A Joint Medical Degree Program is in development—to be launched in January of 2019—wherein RMC will teach the first year of SGU’s five-year medical program to its students. Those who successfully meet the promotion requirements will continue the Doctor of Medicine program in Grenada, or in the UK as part of the Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program—in partnership with Northumbria University. They will then complete their clinical training in the US, UK and Grenada.

The MOU also expresses support for a student exchange program, enabling scholars, graduates and undergraduates from RMC to spend time at SGU, and vice-versa. Faculty and administrative staff will also be able to take part in the exchange programme, and the two universities will conduct collaborative research projects. Short-term, customized courses for students on credit transfer or study abroad programmes will also be facilitated.

Commenting on the signing of the MOU, Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU, said, “The breadth of this agreement is testament to the benefit it will bring to both institutions. A well-rounded medical education is the foundation of any successful doctor’s career, and international experience is an important component of that training. I am delighted that our students will have the opportunity to train at Ramaiah Medical College, and look forward to welcoming their students to our True Blue Campus.”

Noting the benefits of international partnerships, Dr. Naresh Shetty, President of the International Program at RMC, said, “The collaboration between Ramaiah and SGU will open up new frontiers for Indian students, who will be exposed to both Eastern and Western culture and benefit from a truly global perception of health care.”

SGU Students Match Into Competitive Canadian Residency Programs

The annual celebration that is the residency match season kicked off on March 1 when 10 St. George’s University students learned that they had secured first-year residency positions in Canada through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS).

The 2018 SGU graduates will complete their postgraduate training in internal medicine, family medicine, and psychiatry at such programs as McMaster University, the University of British Columbia, the University of Manitoba, the University of Saskatchewan, and the University of Toronto. A second match iteration will take place next month. Match Day in the United States will take place on Friday, March 16.

“We congratulate the students who will begin their medical careers in Canada this summer,” said St. George’s University President G. Richard Olds. “Their work ethic and commitment to medicine have helped equip them with the knowledge and skills to make a significant impact on the communities in which they’ll practice.”

Natalia Reiner, MD SGU ’18 (expected), described herself as “over the moon” upon discovering that she had matched into an internal medicine residency at the University of Toronto, her top-choice program. Earlier in the week, the McGill University graduate had made a list of people to call when the news came, and immediately went to work on it, beginning with her parents, boyfriend, and four siblings, all of whom are back in Canada.

To build up her clinical experience, Dr. Reiner completed three observerships in Ontario and Quebec, in turn building a network of mentors and advocates along the way. She plans to enter U of T’s Eliot Phillipson Clinician-Educator Training Program, and looks forward to giving back to the community not only as a clinician but as a teacher.

“Toronto has a reputation of really focusing on education and academics, and I like that kind of learning environment,” she said.

Jonathan Phang, MD SGU ’18 (expected), and his mother rejoiced when they found out that he was headed to Saskatoon this summer to begin his residency at the University of Saskatchewan. He chose the U of S program for its “supportive environment” and “strength and unity within the entire staff.”

“I had to reread the email a couple times,” said Dr. Phang, who grew up in Vancouver. “Leading up to the noon deadline, it was a roller coaster of emotions, and we were both relieved, excited, and really happy.”

Dr. Phang began to steer his career toward psychiatry during his third-year core rotations in New York, and worked toward that during his fourth-year electives in California, Georgia, Nevada, New York and New Jersey, as well as Vancouver.

“Because I rotated through various parts of the US and Canada, it exposed me to patients from all kinds of backgrounds,” he said. “I think that experience will have prepared me well for what’s to come in residency.”

More than 1,350 Canadians have graduated from the School of Medicine since it opened in 1977, with more than 630 currently enrolled at SGU. Students have a proven track record of success on the United States Medical Licensing Examinations as well. In 2017, first-time test takers from Canada registered a 97 percent pass rate on the USMLE I, with a highly competitive mean score of 230.