Last updated on December 2nd, 2021

The School of Medicine sets high standards for academic progress within the MD Program. In order to maintain satisfactory academic progress, students must continually meet all grade, timeline and professional standards for progress, promotion and retention.

The Doctor of Medicine program is designed to be continuous with minimal interruption. Each term serves as a building block for subsequent terms. Prolonged breaks between terms disrupt the educational process and may adversely affect academic success; therefore, leaves of absence are discouraged.

Students are expected to complete the Doctor of Medicine program within four years of matriculation. Students have the option to extend their timeline to a maximum six years in order to do research, extend their study time and/or complete additional rotations without additional tuition. The Doctor of Medicine program is divided into two segments as follows:

1. The Basic Principles of Medicine and Principles of Clinical Medicine Segments extend over two years and five consecutive terms. Students must complete this segment within three years of matriculation.

2. The Clinical Segment extends over two years and five consecutive terms. Students must meet all graduation requirements within six years of matriculation.

Failure to complete meet these requirements can result in a recommendation for dismissal.

TIMELINE FOR AUGUST MATRICULANTS

Students who matriculate in the August term complete their MD program in four years, assuming no extension to their timeline.

1. Basic Principles of Medicine (BPM) and Principles of Clinical Medicine (PCM) Courses: Students should have completed these courses by May of the second year following their matriculation.

2. Start of the clerkship year: Students who wish to start clinical training in the United States take the USMLE Step 1 in July and start their first clinical term in August or September. Students who wish to start clinical training in the United Kingdom do not have to take the USMLE Step 1 and can start in the United Kingdom in July.

3. End of the advanced clinical year: Students complete the clinical curriculum by May or June in the second year following the commencement of clinical training (e.g., if clinical training begins in July, August, or September 2019, then graduation is in June 2020). This is four years or less after matriculation. Students interested in a US residency should seek a May graduation date, if possible, to ensure ECFMG paperwork and state licensing paperwork prior to the start of residency orientation.

Terms 6 through 10 represent an intensive educational period. Students who start in September have approximately 90 weeks to complete an 80-week curriculum. During this time, students interested in a US residency also study for and take the USMLE Step 2 (CK) and (CS) and apply for residencies. The Graduation Assessment Board (GAB) may advise deceleration. (See Deceleration in the Clinical Years section).

TIMELINE FOR JANUARY MATRICULANTS

Students who matriculate in the January term generally complete their MD program in four and a half years (4.5), assuming no extension to their timeline.

1. Basic Principles of Medicine (BPM) and Principles of Clinical Medicine (PCM) Courses: Students should have completed these courses by December of the second year following their matriculation.

2. Start of the clerkship year: Students who wish to start clinical training in the United States take the USMLE Step 1 in March and start their first clinical term in May or June. Students who wish to start clinical training in the United Kingdom do not have to take the USMLE Step 1 and can start in the United Kingdom in January or April.

3. End of the advanced clinical year: while students can graduate in December in the second year after starting clinical training, most students opt to graduate in May, approximately two years after starting clinical training. Terms 6 through 10 represent an intensive educational period. Students who start in May have approximately 100 weeks to complete an 80-week curriculum and graduate in June. During this time, students interested in a US residency also study for and take the USMLE Step 2 (CK) and (CS) and apply for residencies.

EXTENDED TIMELINES

Students are expected to complete the Basic Principles of Medicine and Principles of Clinical Medicine Courses within five consecutive terms in order to complete this portion of their MD program in two years (as described above). Nonetheless, students who encounter unanticipated personal setbacks or academic difficulties can request an extension of the timeline.

Students may be granted a timeline extension for one of the following reasons:

• Leave of Absence (LOA) to address personal setbacks (example, medical conditions) that prevent the student from successfully completing the academic term.

• Credit Remediation (CR) when academic performance is at risk of not meeting academic performance standards.

• A recommendation by the Academic Progress Review Committee (APRC) or by the Committee on Academic Progress and Professional Standards (CAPPS) for a student to repeat failed coursework.

Students should note, however, that timeline extensions will be factored into the decision-making and recommendation process of the APRC and the CAPPS should students subsequently fail to meet performance standards. All students must complete Terms 1-5 within three years of matriculation.

Additional LOAs between Terms 5 and 6 may be granted.

CLINICAL TRANSITION COURSE:

After successfully completing Term 5, students will be enrolled in a Sakai Clinical Transition Course that is a mandatory requirement for graduation. Students will be required to maintain communication with academic advisors until they sit for USMLE Step 1 or enter clinical rotations in the UK. A lack of communication will be considered a failure to meet professional behavior standards. Failure to meet professional behavior standards may result in students not being promoted to clinical rotations and/or being recommended for dismissal.