SOM grad promotes inquisitive mindset as new head of Student Research Institute

While medical questions remain unanswered, students trained at St. George’s University’s Medical Student Research Institute (MSRI) will be armed with the foundation to discover those answers through research, this according to the institute’s new director, Michael Montalbano, MD/MBA ’16, an assistant professor in the Department of Anatomical Sciences at SGU.

Established in 2009, the MSRI offers Term 2 medical students looking to explore research—beyond standard research opportunities within the medical curriculum. Through the MSRI, students can develop their research with faculty mentorship and graduate with a Distinction in Research award. In the past, the MSRI has published hypothesis-driven research projects on outreach or public health interventions; case reports in collaboration with outside experts; and utilized the application of methods such as 3D printing, ultrasound, and virtual reality.

Recently appointed to head the MSRI, Dr. Montalbano revealed his goals for the institute, which includes cultivating a spirit of inquiry in aspiring physicians.

St. George’s University: What do you hope to achieve in your new role with the Institute?   

Dr. Michael Montalbano: I want to achieve three things. First, I want to continue the good working relations between MSRI faculty and students. There are many faculty mentors doing important work while also giving students access to opportunities to build research skills that can be used later.

Next, I want to enable collaboration and thereby make the process easier for faculty and students to engage in research. This last year has shown us the importance of understanding new problems and acting to resolve them with relevant data. Collaboration is essential to tackle a deluge of data, and I hope to encourage more SGU faculty to become mentors or join in research endeavors in whatever way they can.

And lastly, we must continue to nurture an inquisitive mindset in MSRI students. I want the MSRI to give students the skills that accompany sound scientific approaches to complement the large volume of medical knowledge they learn from their classes. I believe that armed with the proper cognitive exploratory tools, a student can better map out the dense territory of medical facts, make an informed clinical decision when faced with a choice of paths, and perhaps even start a trail of knowledge in previously uncharted terrain. In short, I want to not just keep curiosity alive but actively promote it.

 

“I want the MSRI to give students the skills that accompany sound scientific approaches to complement the large volume of medical knowledge they learn from their classes.”

 

SGU: What type of research is currently being done at the MSRI? 

MM: Although off campus this last year, MSRI has been conducting investigations involving electronic surveys, reviews, and statistical analyses of topics ranging from complementary medicine to clinical cases. With the start of the new term approaching and new minds joining us, I’m looking forward to what additional avenues will be pursued next.

SGU: What research topics you would like to see covered in the future?

MM: In the future, I’d like to see studies that can sift through the vast amount of data on the changes that have occurred in the past year. I think there will be large downstream effects in public health and widespread digitization of information, which means much more accessibility than in the past. I’m confident that those joining MSRI who are curious and capable will have great ideas that we can sharpen into formal studies.

SGU: What are some of the benefits to students who participate in research at the MSRI? 

MM: MSRI offers a chance to improve the competitiveness of those students who are seeking more specialized residencies by allowing them to perform research and gain experience in writing papers and/or presenting at conferences. MSRI students are also given the opportunity to apply for a one-time reimbursement of US$1,000 if they are the first presenting author selected to present at a recognized conference.

Essentially, MSRI students get to take their knowledge and apply it towards real unknowns—by giving them a background that makes it easier to participate in research opportunities in the future and helping to grow confidence in their scientific literacy when learning about new findings.

SGU: As an SGU grad, what does it mean to you to be appointed as head of the MSRI?

MM: I feel very grateful to be given the opportunity to head the MSRI. For me, the appointment means I am tasked with letting the program continue to grow and adapt as any good research body should. I hope to do it justice and continue the good work that Dr. Martin Forde has done in past terms.

SGU: Why did you choose a career in academic medicine that focuses on helping future physicians with research opportunities?

MM: All physicians, in some way, have a duty to master, update, and pass on medical knowledge. With a primary role in academic medicine, I can contribute to student experiences that later codify into what graduates will do for patients and the broader medical community. With research specifically, that means providing the ability to understand the limitations of previous evidence, seek out new findings, and correctly synthesize what one knows to better oneself and others. As the original root of the word “doctor” means to show or teach, I feel this is apt. I hope as head of MSRI my colleagues and students will feel so too.

– Ray-Donna Peters

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SOMAA Charity Drive Aids Thousands Affected by St. Vincent Volcano Eruption

SGU alumni contributed more than $20,000 to relief efforts in St. Vincent.

Drawing on the generous contributions made by the St. George’s University alumni community, the School of Medicine Alumni Association (SOMAA) held a successful charity drive this spring to help those affected by the La Soufriere volcano eruption on the island of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

“On behalf of the SOMAA, we are so thankful to our devoted alumni for helping us raise more than $20,000 for this worthy cause,” said Bruce Bonanno, MD ’83, president of the SOMAA. “SGU has had a rich history with the people of St. Vincent. As the volcano erupted again this spring, we felt it crucial that we do our part as an organization to support the island during its time of need, and we could not have done it without your participation.”

More than 20,000 people were displaced when La Soufriere erupted in April. While many have since returned home, more than 2,000 people still live in shelters, with hundreds of homes needed to be rebuilt according to Dr. Rosalind Ambrose, president of the St. Vincent and the Grenadines Medical Association and a 1983 graduate of the SGU’s School of Medicine.

SOMAA gifted the money to the SVG Medical Association, which encompasses medical professionals—many of whom are SGU graduates—who live on the island. The association initiates a number of community service and public health outreach events for the people of the island and plans to use the money to help people replace lost household objects.

SGU donated 8,000+ meals to St. Vincent in early 2021.

“We are ever grateful to the heartwarming efforts by SGU’s Alumni Association and the alumni community to assist St. Vincent right now,” Dr. Ambrose said. “A number of evacuees from the ‘Red Zone’ have lost everything, and the government is relocating them entirely. The donation will be used to help these families replace everyday items in their homes and help them regain a sense of normalcy.”

Seismologists are still monitoring the volcano and are not yet in the position to say whether it has returned to a “sleep state” because it is still giving off ongoing steam and gas emissions and causing minor earthquakes, Dr. Ambrose said, adding that the recent tropical storm/hurricane produced several lahars that further damaged villages near the volcano.

For more than 25 years, School of Medicine medical students completed a semester of their basic sciences on the island. When the last eruption happened in 1979, students who were there studying and working jumped in to help the island, even as medical students. Years later, they helped to donate more than 8,000 meals to those affected by the volcanic eruption.

“We will continue to help the people of St. Vincent in any way we can and we thank our alumni for their support,” Dr. Bonanno said.

The SOMAA continues to accept donations of any size for those affected by the volcano. To contribute, please send monetary donations to: https://www.sgusomaa.org/donations/

– Laurie Chartorynsky

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SAS Valedictorian Continues Family Legacy in Medicine at SGU

With both her parents being physicians, and her older sister in medical school, it came as no surprise when Namratha Guruvaiah Sridhara also decided on a career in medicine. Yet, it’s not just about joining the family business for Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara. She has always had an interest in the sciences and incredible respect for the medical profession, believing it to be one of the best ways to serve humanity.

“My parents being doctors has partially influenced my decision to become one, but it’s much more than that,” said Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara, BSc ’20, who graduated at the top of her undergraduate class and is now in her second year of medical school at St. George’s University. “I am extremely passionate about helping others and having had the opportunity to work in different hospitals for my summer jobs has further fueled my desire to pursue this career. I believe that health is wealth and delivering healthcare to those in need is a remarkably noble vocation.”

Expected to graduate with her MD in 2024, Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara hopes to specialize in psychiatry.

“Mental health is becoming a real challenge in today’s world, especially in this pandemic,” she said. “In many parts of the world, mental health is not being properly addressed and I want to advocate for its importance.”

Early Signs of a Doctor in the Making

At the age of five, Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara moved with her family from India to the Bahamas, where she completed her primary and secondary school education at Queen’s College, Nassau. While there, she excelled in both school and national examinations, earning a perfect 4.0 GPA, and later graduated as the school’s valedictorian in 2017—two years after her sister Nanditha completed the same feat.

“My sister has always served as a role model for me,” said Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara. “She inspires me whether it be in studies or extracurricular activities. Additionally, my parents have also been a huge motivating factor in my life. They keep me grounded and continuously offer words of encouragement. They played a major part in my success and pushed me to be the best version of myself daily.”

 

“Mental health is becoming a real challenge in today’s world, especially in this pandemic. I want to advocate for its importance.”

 

Continuing in her sister’s footsteps, Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara then enrolled as a pre-medical student in SGU’s seven-year Doctor of Medicine program. A firm believer that the harder she works, the luckier she will be—Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara again went the extra mile in striving for excellence by maintaining a 4.0 GPA and was selected as the 2021 School of Arts and Sciences valedictorian—just like her sister in years prior.

“Being the 2021 SAS valedictorian was a true honor,” stated Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara. “The past year was a challenge due to the unexpected pandemic. However, with perseverance and consistency, I was able to complete my degree. It served as a reminder to never give up. I’m happy to see that the hard work has paid off.”

While completing the first part in achieving her MD, Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara challenged herself to strike the right balance between her academic goals and extracurricular pursuits. Carving out time from her busy schedule, she has been a member of several student organizations, including Women in Medicine and the Surgery Club, and has served as the Urban Humanitarian Projects co-chair for the Iota Epsilon Alpha (IEA) International Honor Society this past semester—and plans to serve as a grand marshal for the August 2021 term.

“Balancing schoolwork and self-care was something I definitely struggled with initially,” admitted Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara. “However, the key for me was being flexible and setting realistic goals. I made different schedules for my studies and stuck to what suited me the best. I also made sure to make time for myself whether it be going to the gym, or just a walk around this beautiful campus.”

According to Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara, another reason she chose to attend SGU was that it offered a strong support system that focused primarily on ensuring student success. She also described SGU’s picturesque campus environment, with its scenic views, beach-front gym, and various cuisine options, as the perfect way to unwind and destress, especially after exams.

“I love that SGU has a massive support system to help us through this journey,” stated Ms. Guruvaiah Sridhara. “The University provides great training and education to aspiring physicians. My experience here so far has been great.”

 

– Ray-Donna Peters

 

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What does research have to do with treating ER patients? Everything

For Nicholas D. Caputo, MD ’08, the associate chief of emergency medicine at NYC Health + Hospitals/Lincoln in the Bronx, investigating diseases like COVID-19 to learn more about their origins and health effects has allowed his team to more effectively care for critically ill patients that come through the busy hospital’s emergency room.

Dr. Caputo, along with colleagues, have published multiple articles in various medical journals and based on their experiences and patient encounters within the ER, including several related to findings about the COVID-19 disease.

For instance, in the spring of 2020, the team published the first study on awake self-proning for COVID-positive patients as a means to stave off intubation, according to Dr. Caputo. The study was published in Academic Emergency Medicine (the official publication of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine) and cited in The New York Times.

Earlier this year, his team published the only reported outcomes data for the New York City public hospital system in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, which had some “gut-wrenching findings in regard to inequities and disparities in COVID outcomes,” he said.

Sharing the correlation between research and emergency medicine, and specifically how it helps him approach his job every day, were among the topics that Dr. Caputo spoke with SGU News about in a recent interview.

SGU: How do you apply findings from your research to your role as an EM doctor?

Dr. Caputo: Research allows me to go into each shift with a different perspective. On the one hand, it allows me to deliver care to patients with the mindset of treating their individual situation based on what we know from previous research findings. On the other hand, it also allows me to take those patient interactions and formulate hypotheses about broader issues that other ER doctors may encounter and ultimately help advance the emergency medicine specialty.

 

“A good scientist always keeps an open mind in the pursuit of truth. Keeping an open mind allows one to critically think outside-the-box which may lead to a better solution to treatment—and a positive outcome for the patient.”

 

SGU: What lessons have you learned from the global health crisis that can be applied to ongoing patient care?

Dr. Caputo: The most important lesson I learned is that a good scientist always keeps an open mind in the pursuit of truth. Keeping an open mind allows one to critically think outside the box, which may lead to a better solution to treatment—and a positive outcome for the patient.

SGU: What appeals to you about emergency medicine?

Dr. Caputo: The biggest appeal to me in emergency medicine is that on any given shift—no matter where you are working—you have the potential to see anything across the spectrum of medical pathology. That’s the great thing about emergency medicine—we truly see it all.

SGU: What responsibilities do you have as associate chief of emergency medicine?

Dr. Caputo: In this position, I help coordinate the daily operations of the emergency department, and oversee the quality review process, performance improvement, and research, among other necessary roles to help ensure the department runs smoothly so we can deliver the highest quality of care, safely to our community.

SGU: You are also an Army Reservist—how does your medical background help you when you are called up for service?

Dr. Caputo: My working in a Level 1 Trauma Center in one of the busiest single-site emergency departments in the country has provided me the experience I need to treat our soldiers on the battlefield who have similar if not even more devastating traumatic injuries. That’s one of the things I am most grateful for in working where I work.

SGU: How did SGU help prepare you for your current hospital role?

Dr. Caputo: SGU gave me the drive to want to do more—to stand out by showing up early, leaving late, and doing research on my own time in order to better myself.

SGU: What was the moment that you realized you’d made the right decision to come to SGU?

Dr. Caputo: When I matched in the specialty I wanted at the place I wanted for residency and where I still work today.

SGU: What if you hadn’t said yes to SGU?

Dr. Caputo: I don’t really want to think about that!

– Laurie Chartorynsky

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Thai alum cites “fast-paced nature” as major appeal to emergency medicine

Although Natcha Rummaneethorn, MD ’20, will continue her career amid the hustle and bustle of New York City, her passion for medicine began during medical mission trips to the rural villages outside of her native Bangkok, Thailand. While the two areas look almost nothing alike, she said there are similarities when it comes to healthcare.

“Ever since those mission trips, I’ve wanted to work in underserved areas where people need the most help and don’t have adequate healthcare access,” said Dr. Rummaneethorn, who is a first-year emergency medicine resident at NYC Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan.

Dr. Rummaneethorn shared what she looks forward to most in her residency and how prepared she feels for the next step in her career.

SGU: What led you to go into medicine?

Dr. Rummaneethorn: My father is a dermatologist, and my mom is an ICU nurse. They influenced me to go into medicine to a certain point, but what really drove me was a medical mission in Thailand through my church. We provided medical care and supplies to rural areas in Thailand, such as villages in the mountains or hills where there’s difficult access to healthcare and hospitals. They are without basic equipment and simple medications like aspirin or ibuprofen that we have commonly, and for them, it’s two to three hours to the nearest hospital.

SGU: Why did you choose to enter emergency medicine?

Dr. Rummaneethorn: I enjoy the fast-paced nature of an emergency department. In general, I try to do things as efficiently as possible, and I like that kind of nature in emergency medicine. Also, there’s always something new for you to see, and we have to have at least basic knowledge for every specialty because we receive patients with a wide array of problems. I’m looking forward to practicing in New York City because of the diverse patient population and the level of training I’ll obtain to handle the most severe situations.

SGU: How would you describe your time at SGU?

Dr. Rummaneethorn: My academic experience at SGU was great due to the rigorous curriculum as well as a number of excellent faculties that provided superb education, such as the biochemistry and pharmacology professors in particular. Also, being on the island of Grenada, the location gave me numerous opportunities to have hands-on experiences with local Grenadians. These experiences allowed me to grow my clinical knowledge and skills as an aspiring physician. On top of that, I had a chance to learn about the Caribbean culture, enabling me to be equipped for taking care of my patients who are of diverse backgrounds during my clinical rotations in Brooklyn.

SGU: How often did you come across an SGU grad during your clinical rotations?

Dr. Rummaneethorn: One of the major benefits of SGU is its large alumni network. If utilized appropriately and effectively, this will turn into a very useful tool in preparing for a residency application. During my clinical rotations, I was extremely surprised at how many attendings I met who turned out to be SGU alumni. They were ready to help me as well as other SGU students rotating with them.

SGU: What advice would you have for a Thai student who was entering medical school?

Dr. Rummaneethorn: Students should also reach out for help early. I prepared myself for my residency application from day one. In my first semester, I attended a lecture with Dr. [John] Madden, who’s an SGU grad and former emergency physician, about emergency medicine, and from there I tried to attend all the seminars that I could. I feel like they really paid off because each helped prepare me for the application process.

– Brett Mauser

 

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SGU President Addresses Physician Shortage on Good Day Chicago

St. George’s University President Dr. G. Richard Olds joined “Good Day Chicago” on Fox 32 News to discuss the nation’s growing doctor shortage.

New projections estimate that the United States will be short up to 124,000 physicians by 2034. U.S. medical schools aren’t training enough doctors to close this gap.

“We have to start doing something about it because it’s impacting the care of patients,” Dr. Olds urged during the July 1 interview.

He went on to examine possible solutions for the shortage, such as building more medical schools and funding more residency positions. Dr. Olds believes it’s also imperative that we look to international medical schools like SGU to train the nation’s physician workforce.

“As a result of international schools filling in that gap, St. George’s University is actually the largest supplier of doctors in the United States,” he said.

SGU Welcomes Inaugural April Class

Siblings Stephan and Beatrice Attilus began their medical studies together at SGU this April.

Last week, St. George’s University welcomed its inaugural April class of aspiring doctors with a virtual White Coat Ceremony. Each term, the ceremony is held for first-term students, representing an important milestone marking their entry into the medical profession.

“I want to welcome the students from the first April start for the School of Medicine,” said Dr. Charles R. Modica, chancellor of SGU. “Forty-five years after our first charter class—and in the middle of a pandemic—you’ve decided to take upon yourselves the rigorous studies to pursue a medical degree. We’re here to help you succeed in any way we can, and if you’re anything like your predecessors, I think you’ll do just fine. We’re excited to have you as the newest charter class of the University.”

The 2025 April class joined its fellow incoming students from the August 2020 and January 2021 classes from St. George’s University of Grenada School of Medicine/Northumbria University Four- and Five-Year Program and the School of Medicine, who had their White Coat Ceremonies in March. The April class welcomed students from 22 countries, including the United States, Ecuador, Canada, Argentina, India, Algeria, China, Grenada, Jamaica, Nigeria, Cuba, Guyana, Haiti, Fiji, Republic of South Korea, Afghanistan, Cameroon, Ethiopia, El Salvador, Ghana, Rwanda, and Ukraine.

In his welcome remarks to the latest incoming class, Dr. Marios Loukas, the dean of the School of Medicine, encouraged the medical students to strive for excellence in their pursuit of knowledge and to heed the oath they were about to pledge.

“As you don your white physician’s coats, you pledge an oath of professionalism and service,” said Dr. Loukas. “Professionalism is a commitment to integrity, altruism, competence, and ethics in the service of others. We must endeavor to honor the sacred trust and privilege society places on medical professionals—cognizant that the standard is an ideal that we must continuously aim to achieve. I welcome you to the noble profession of medicine.”

In his keynote address, Dr. G. Richard Olds, president of SGU and a tropical disease specialist, shared his knowledge and expertise about the fight against COVID-19. He focused on the history of the white coat and the place physicians held in society.

“We have an opportunity during the COVID-19 pandemic to reestablish what’s important in physicians,” said Dr. Olds. “By taking on great personal risk and sometimes becoming surrogate loved ones while caring for patients, this global health crisis has shined a light on healthcare professionals on the frontlines and created a new opportunity for all healthcare workers to be appreciated by greater society.”

After sharing a touching story on what it means to be a good physician, Dr. Olds left the newest class of future doctors with a few additional words of wisdom.

“You will learn a lot of medical facts from your faculty—facts about the body and how it breaks down in disease,” he said. “You’ll learn how to diagnose difficult illnesses and how to treat them. But if you’re open to it, you’ll learn how to become a better doctor largely from your patients. So, as you don your white coat today, welcome to the noble profession of medicine.” 

– Ray-Donna Peters

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SGU Announces Partnership with Kwantlen Polytechnic University

St. George’s University announced a new direct admission partnership with Kwantlen Polytechnic University in British Columbia, Canada.  

Each student admitted to the new 4+4 program will receive a $10,000 scholarship to begin studies in medicine or veterinary medicine at SGU following completion of their undergraduate degree at KPU. 

“We’re proud to team up with Kwantlen Polytechnic University to provide a direct pathway for students to pursue careers in medicine,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, president of St. George’s University. “With US and Canadian medical school admissions more competitive than ever, this partnership can relieve students of the stress of the standard application process.”

Students can gain provisional acceptance any time during their first three years at KPU. They learn if they’re accepted to the KPU/SGU program in the fall of their fourth year. All applicants must complete a degree in health sciences. To qualify, medical school applicants must maintain a 3.4 grade point average and record a competitive score on the MCAT. Veterinary applicants must maintain a 3.2 grade point average and post a score of at least 300 on the GRE.  

Upon graduation, successful applicants may enroll immediately at SGU. Medical students have the opportunity to spend one year at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom. 

Admitted students are eligible for merit and need-based financial aid, in addition to the $10,000 grant from St. George’s. Graduates of St. George’s can pursue residencies throughout the United States and Canada.

“Canada is facing acute shortages of both doctors and veterinarians,” said Sandra Banner, SGU’s director of admission for Canada. “Partnerships like this one can boost the number of skilled professionals working in these fields—and help people make their dream of becoming a physician or veterinarian a reality.” 

“We are very excited about this new partnership with St. George’s University in Grenada. It has been years in the making,” said Carole St. Laurent, associate vice president, KPU International. “This partnership will not only provide the opportunity for our health science students to achieve their goals to become doctors, it will also make KPU an attractive destination for local and international students to more readily access a graduate level education in medicine by beginning their educational journey at KPU.” 

“This partnership is welcome news to our students who will now have the opportunity to pursue their dreams to become doctors,” said Dr. Elizabeth Worobec, dean of the Faculty of Science and Horticulture at KPU. “The seats for medical schools in the lower mainland are highly competitive, so for many of our students, a chance like this to study abroad to fulfill their goals is a welcome opportunity.” 

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90 Aspiring Physicians Inducted Into Gold Humanism Honor Society

Ninety aspiring physicians were inducted this month into St. George’s University’s chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society for the 2020-2021 academic year. The prestigious award recognizes students, residents, and faculty who exemplify compassionate patient care and serve as role models, mentors, and leaders in medicine.

“Being inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society is a testament to the character of our medical students when it comes to treating and caring for patients with the utmost care and compassion,” said Dr. Stephen Weitzman, dean emeritus of the School of Medicine. “It is a recognition of them as finest exemplars of the best ideals of medicine—characteristics that are especially critical to portray during the global healthcare crisis.”

The School of Medicine held a virtual ceremony on June 2 to celebrate the latest inductees.  Clinical students from the 2019-2020 class also attended the event as their induction was put on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

“Being inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society is a testament to the character of our medical students when it comes to treating and caring for patients with the utmost care and compassion. It is a recognition of them as finest exemplars of the best ideals of medicine—characteristics that are especially critical to portray during the global healthcare crisis.”

 

Inductees were chosen from approximately 400 peer nominations. Students were invited to nominate their clinical peers who demonstrated exemplary patient care, devotion to the community and the underprivileged, trustworthiness, and strong listening skills reflective of the ideal SGU medical student. In addition, students must be in good academic standing. New members were chosen from among the nominees by a committee of SOM faculty and administration.

“It is a great honor to become a member of the Gold Humanism Honor Society—only a small portion of each class receive this well-respected accolade,” said Dr. Cheryl Cox-Macpherson, SGU GHHS chapter advisor, and chair of the bioethics division of SOM’s Department of Clinical Skills. “We are so proud of these students and know these qualities will guide them in their careers as compassionate and caring physicians.”

The Arnold P. Gold Foundation established the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) in 2002 out of a desire to foster and acknowledge humanism during medical education. Since its inception, the GHHS has been established at more than 160 medical schools, awarding thousands of students with honors. The SGU chapter was established in 2004.

 

– Laurie Chartorynsky 

How to Boost Diversity in Medical School: SGU President Featured in RealClear Health

SGU Students Take Altruistic Initiative During COVID-19 Pandemic; Reaffirm Their Commitment To Becoming Doctors

An article by SGU President Dr. G. Richard Olds was recently featured in RealClearHealth.

The piece, “How to boost diversity in medical school,” details the importance of diverse representation in medical education. Dr. Olds reasoned that by making diversity a bigger recruiting priority, today’s medical schools can “cultivate a more diverse physician network” and bring about a “more accessible, more equitable healthcare system.”

He also detailed some of the measures that SGU is taking to open doors for underrepresented students:

“Making medical school more affordable is another way to attract and enroll a more diverse group of students. More than 75 percent of students at St. George’s University, the school I lead, receive scholarships. Dozens of students have benefited from our CityDoctors scholarship program, which provides aid to students from the New York metropolitan area who commit to working in the city’s public hospital system upon graduation,” Dr. Olds wrote.

He added that international medical schools are a key source of diversity to the U.S. physician workforce. SGU’s student body represents 49 U.S. states and more than 100 countries.

 

Learn more about SGU’s commitment to diversity on our website.