Kathryn Providence, MD SGU ’05, Joins Cherokee Women’s Health Specialist

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Born and raised in Bermuda, Dr. Kathryn Providence went on to earn her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine in 2005. She has gone on to a successful career in obstetrics and gynecology, and recently joined the staff at Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Woodstock, GA. Dr. Providence is a former Legacy of Excellence scholarship recipient and dean’s list member at SGU.

Grenada General Hospital Receives over US $12,000 in Equipment from IEA

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Fast, accurate, reliable. When it comes to patient testing, health care professionals rely on devices with these qualities. That’s why in December the Iota Epsilon Alpha (IEA) medical student honor society at St. George’s University donated an i-STAT® blood analyzer system valued at $12,000 US to the Grenada General Hospital.

The i-STAT blood analyzer is a portable diagnostic tool that provides testing at the patient bedside offering insight into patient electrolytes, blood gases, cardiac enzymes, and more. Cardiac enzymes are a key determinant of heart function and an important indicator of a heart attack in process. Tests using the blood analyzer provide results within minutes, often minimizing the need for more invasive, expensive procedures.

The Iota Epsilon Alpha (IEA) medical student honor society of St. George’s University dedicates itself not only to promoting academic excellence but to provide for the public health and welfare of the public, particularly the underprivileged.

“The fundamental goal of this donation is to save lives, but more importantly to increase the capabilities of the hospital with the adequate resources,” said IEA president Brian Beckord.

Katherine Yearwood, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Skills, and Dr. Joseph Feldman MD ’89, SGU alumnae and chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Hackensack Medical Center in New Jersey, also played an integral role by suggesting equipment that would significantly improve the diagnostic capabilities of the General Hospital. Grenada now joins Trinidad and Barbados as the only islands in the Caribbean to have this revolutionary device.

“The iSTAT machine is going to be extremely beneficial to patient care and patient outcome,” said Dr. George Mitchell, the hospital’s chief medical officer.

Iota Epsilon Alpha has also pledged to fund the cartridges and updates needed throughout the life of the i-STAT blood analyzer, and it donated two pediatric scales for weighing infants, and two pulse oximeters for checking the oxygen saturation of a patient’s blood were also donated to the General Hospital. In 2012, IEA raised over $13,000 US, and incoming president and fifth-term student Raza Mushtaq vowed to carry the mantle into 2013 as they continue to make an impact, one life at a time.

IEA was founded at St. George’s University in 1992, and includes medical students who have excelled academically, and are willing to participate in various extracurricular activities and international health projects. To make this a reality, IEA holds a number of fundraising events such as the WII Olympics and dodge ball tournaments, with a focus on giving back to the island of Grenada.

St. George’s University Welcomes 560 Students at Spring 2013 School of Medicine White Coat Ceremonies

Students in St. George’s University School of Medicine and the University’s Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program waited with excitement, exuberance, and a bit of apprehension. In two ceremonies, in two countries, the Spring 2013 class of 560 medical students took their first step in the journey that is medical school.

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It is a milestone that SGU graduate Leslie Griffin, MD, MPH ’08, vividly recalled when as a new medical student she began her medical career at St. George’s University. Dr. Griffin, now a clinical faculty member at University of Tennessee Family Practice, put the feeling into words as the master of ceremonies at the School of Medicine White Coat Ceremony in Grenada on Monday, January 21.

“You chose a medical school that will not only provide you with an excellent education, but with access to experiences with diverse medical systems and cultures,” Dr. Griffin said, “Over the next four years you will create lasting relationships that will help you as you advance though the trials of being a medical student on towards residency and beyond.”

Delivering a spirited and passionate address, keynote speaker Charles Twort MA, MD, FRCP, FRCPE, a consultant physician in general and respiratory medicine at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, described the White Coat Ceremony as a symbol of humanism and the coat as a cloak of responsibility, trust, and purity.

“You’re amongst the greatest and the brightest of the crop; however you have a responsibility as a future doctor to link your academic intellect with your care for individual patients,” Dr. Twort said. “The donning of the white coat is a symbol of respect and trust from your patients, but this respect must be earned and kept.”

Emphasizing communication as the key to success, Dr. Twort continued, imploring students to “listen to your patients without interrupting and give them information in words they can understand. Avoid medical jargon so your patients can confidently and collaboratively make decisions with you about their healthcare.”

The entering class of students in Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars program took their professional oath in a ceremony at Domain Hall within the Northumbria Students’ Union building in Newcastle, UK.

Dr. David Pencheon, the director of the National Health Service (NHS) Sustainable Development Unit, was the keynote speaker for the evening. He explained that patients demand two important qualities from their doctors. First, they must be a strong communicator, particularly by listening thoroughly to their patients’ experiences, abiding by the phrase “Trust me, I’m your patient.”

Second, he insisted that doctors must build and foster lifelong relationships with their clientele, serving as a resource for their patients. Doctors will first do something to a patient, then for a patient, and through forming a strong bond, then ultimately with a patient.

In addition, Dr. Pencheon insisted that the future doctors must distinguish and relay the causes of health, a quality as crucial as seekin g the causes of disease.. Looking ahead to the future, Dr. Pencheon explained the world needs leaders who rank global health foremost among their priorities. He said that doctors shine in critical times, but such situations would not arise if budding issues were addressed before they became a widespread problem.

Addressing the incoming students at the white coat ceremony in Grenada thirty-six years and four days after the School of Medicine accepted its first class; St. George’s University Chancellor Charles Modica referenced the humble beginnings of the University. Despite its many changes throughout the years, he stated, “One thing that hasn’t changed is the true desire in classes such as this, to become physicians and to serve fellow men, and that’s what we’re all about – pursuing dreams and making them happen.”

CityDoctors Scholarship Recipients To Provide a “Double Dose” of Primary Care Help in New York City

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Twenty New York City residents were awarded more than $2.4 million in scholarships through St. George’s University and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s CityDoctors scholarship program. Among the recipients were sisters Malvi and Miloni Thakker of Queens, who have pledged to earn their MD and then enter a primary care residency program at an HHC hospital. The scholarship program was designed to address the shortage of primary care doctors in New York City.

Deputy Mayor Gibbs Announces CityDoctors Medical School Scholarships Awards $2.4 Million to 20 New York City Students

HHC Receives Commitment for Primary Care Work from St. George’s University School of Medicine Scholarship Recipients

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St. George’s University Dean of the School of Medicine Stephen Weitzman, Health and Human Services, New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation President Alan D. Aviles, St. George’s University Chancellor Charles Modica and Linda Gibbs, Deputy Mayor awarded $2.4 million to 20 NYC students as part of the CityDoctors medical school scholarship program at Gracie Mansion on Monday, January 7, 2013.

Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services Linda I. Gibbs and Health and Hospitals Corporation President Al Aviles today announced that 20 New York City students will receive scholarships totaling $2.4 million to attend St. George’s University School of Medicine under the first year of the CityDoctors scholarship program. In return, the students have committed to give back to their communities by practicing primary care medicine at a New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) hospital after receiving their medical degrees.

The scholarship recipients have been selected based on their academic excellence and financial need and will receive either partial or full scholarships to pay for medical school tuition for periods of up to four years, with some scholarships valued at over $200,000 each. The CityDoctors scholarship program, which was launched by Deputy Mayor Gibbs, HHC President Alan D. Aviles, and SGU Chancellor Dr. Charles Modica in April 2012, will provide more than $11 million in scholarships to New York City residents over five years. The program will help address the national shortage of primary care physicians and also increase opportunity for city youth by making a medical degree and primary care career more accessible for talented young men and women with limited financial resources.

“New York City’s public hospitals and clinics serve over one million New Yorkers each year and are critical providers of culturally competent, patient-centered primary care,” said Deputy Mayor Gibbs. “CityDoctors is drawing some of the best and brightest medical providers to our system, addressing a pending shortfall of talent and ensuring that the patients who rely on us will have dedicated providers for decades to come.”

“Medical schools today are simply not producing enough primary care physicians to meet society’s needs in the future,” said HHC President Alan D. Aviles. “The CityDoctors scholarships help HHC bring quality primary care to New York City residents while also providing an opportunity for medical students with roots in the community to give back.”

“St. George’s has long been dedicated to meeting the need for primary care physicians and we’re proud that our partnership with HHC is helping to meet a growing demand,” said St. George’s University Chancellor Charles Modica. “Our students are uniquely qualified to meet the needs of a diverse population and the skills they acquire throughout their training allows them to return home and give back to their community.”

The first class of CityDoctors Scholarship Program recipients are a diverse group of 12 women and eight men, representing all five boroughs. Many graduated from New York City public high schools, including from Stuyvesant High, Brooklyn Tech, Staten Island Tech, Townsend Harris, Francis Lewis, Midwood and Bronx High School of Science. The winners hold undergraduate degrees from prestigious institutions including the State University of New York, the City University of New York, Cornell University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston University, Oberlin College, the New York Institute of Technology and Brooklyn College.

To be eligible, the students had to fulfill all the requirements to be accepted to medical school and meet at least one of the following criteria: graduated from a NYC high school, have five years of residency in NYC, have a parent employed by HHC or the City of New York, or be employed by HHC or the City of New York for at least five years. In return for their scholarships, for each equivalent year of tuition they receive each student has committed to provide one year of service as a primary care attending physician at one of HHC’s 11 public hospitals. Several of the students have already completed part of the medical school educations, while others are beginning their studies this semester.

The CityDoctors scholarship recipients are:

Name Borough Commitment to HHC
Eric Behar Manhattan 2 years
Felicia Fojas Queens 1 year
Arun John Queens 2 years
Kunal Kambli Queens 2 years
Mehvesh Khan Brooklyn 2 years
Gloria Lee Queens 2.5 years
Julian Lildharrie Bronx 4 years
Montgomery Lobe Manhattan 1/2 year
Praeophayom Prathuangsuk Queens 4 years
Megan Reynolds Manhattan 2 years
David Roy Queens 4 years
Nawaz Rupani Queens 4 years
Sarah Sahl Manhattan 2 years
Ali Samee Queens 2 years
Aanchal Sharma Staten Island 1.5 years
Malvi Thakker Queens 2 years
Miloni Thakker Queens 2 years
Corinne Vidulich Manhattan 4 years
Monica Wat Manhattan 2 years
Safwa Zafar Staten Island 2 years

Bios and photos of the scholarship winners can be found at:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/hhc/html/pressroom/press-release-20121022-citydoctors-bios.shtml

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) advises that the U.S. could face a shortage of 90,000 physicians by 2020 and the overall shortage could worsen as the physician workforce ages and retires just as more Americans will need care. The AAMC says a reason for this shortage is that primary care clinicians earn less than half of what the top two earning specialties make, and medical students often choose to enter the higher-paying specialties, rather than primary care, when faced with their medical school loans. Seventy-eight percent of U.S. medical students have a student loan debt of $100,000 or greater. In 2010, medical students graduated from public institutions with an average debt of $148,222 and $172,422 from private institutions.

To apply for the CityDoctors scholarships, applicants submitted essays explaining why they should be awarded this scholarship and how they will contribute to the health care of New York City using their attending position in primary care at an HHC hospital. For more information and to apply for a scholarship, visit the CityDoctors website at www.citydoctors.com.

About HHC
The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is a $6.7 billion integrated healthcare delivery system with its own 420,000 member health plan, MetroPlus, and is the largest municipal healthcare organization in the country. HHC serves 1.4 million New Yorkers every year and more than 475,000 are uninsured. HHC provides medical, mental health and substance abuse services through its 11 acute care hospitals, four skilled nursing facilities, six large diagnostic and treatment centers and more than 70 community based clinics. HHC Health and Home Care also provides in-home services for New Yorkers. HHC was the 2008 recipient of the National Quality Forum and The Joint Commission’s John M. Eisenberg Award for Innovation in Patient Safety and Quality.

About St. George’s University
St. George’s University School of Medicine pioneered the concept of international medical education and remains at the forefront of educating students to meet the demands of the modern practice of medicine. St. George’s University was the first private medical school in the Caribbean, and the first to be accredited by the Caribbean Accreditation Authority for Education in Medicine and Health Professions (CAAM-HP). Its students have come from over 140 countries and its more than 10,000 graduate physicians in the global health care system who have been licensed in all 50 states and Canada and have practiced in over 50 countries around the world. For more information, visit www.sgu.edu.

St. George’s University World Health Organization Collaborating Center Delivers Keynote Speech at Dubai Conference

Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine Brings Issue of Occupational Health and Safety to a Global Audience

news akpinar dlci mugePresenting at a conference on occupational health and safety in United Arab Emirates, St. George’s University Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (DPHPM) brought its message of needlestick prevention to a global audience.

According to the International Council of Nurses, one in eight health care workers are injured by needlesticks, often exposing them to serious or fatal infection. Covering this important topic in her keynote address at the Occupational Health for Health Care Workers Conference at the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) in Dubai, Dr. Muge Akpinar-Elci drew on the work that St. George’s World Health Organization Collaborating Center (WHO CC) and its partners are doing to promote worker safety in the Caribbean.

Dr. Akpinar Elci, an associate professor and track director for environmental and occupational health in the DPHPM and director of St. George’s WHO CC, commented on the opportunity to speak to this international conference, saying, “Occupational health and safety are highly important issues for health care workers around the world.  As a WHO Collaborating Center St. George’s has an international platform from which to bring a far-reaching discussion on this issue.  We were happy to play our part.”

Prior to the conference, Dr. Akpinar-Elci was invited to address the faculty of the Institute of Public Health at UAEU by Professor Tar-Ching Aw, the dean of that department. She discussed St. George’s success in obtaining CEPH accreditation for the MPH program and on becoming a WHO Collaborating Center, a distinction that UAEU also wishes to pursue.

The conference welcomed approximately 150 participants and it is expected that visit will be the start of a long collaboration between the UAEU and St. George’s University.

According to the International Council of Nurses, one in eight health care workers are injured by needlesticks, often exposing them to serious or fatal infection. Covering this important topic in her keynote address at the Occupational Health for Health Care Workers Conference at the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) in Dubai, Dr. Muge Akpinar-Elci drew on the work that St. George’s World Health Organization Collaborating Center (WHO CC) and its partners are doing to promote worker safety in the Caribbean.

Dr. Akpinar Elci, an associate professor and track director for environmental and occupational health in the DPHPM and director of St. George’s WHO CC, commented on the opportunity to speak to this international conference, saying, “Occupational health and safety are highly important issues for health care workers around the world.  As a WHO Collaborating Center St. George’s has an international platform from which to bring a far-reaching discussion on this issue.  We were happy to play our part.”

Prior to the conference, Dr. Akpinar-Elci was invited to address the faculty of the Institute of Public Health at UAEU by Professor Tar-Ching Aw, the dean of that department. She discussed St. George’s success in obtaining CEPH accreditation for the MPH program and on becoming a WHO Collaborating Center, a distinction that UAEU also wishes to pursue.

The conference welcomed approximately 150 participants and it is expected that visit will be the start of a long collaboration between the UAEU and St. George’s University.

HackensackUMC and St. George’s University Bestow Scholarships to Four Students

Hackensack University Medical Center (HackensackUMC) and St. George’s University (SGU) recently awarded four partial scholarships to SGU students who are a permanent resident of Bergen County through the CityDoctors – HackensackUMC Scholarship Program.  Recipients of the scholarships are Matthew Pontell of River Vale, N.J., Krishna Choksi of Alpine, N.J., Sarina Bains of Cresskill, N.J. and Nauman Ramay of Paramus, N.J. and son of Dr. Hanif Ramay, Psychiatry Medical Staff member at HackensackUMC.

Pictured from left to right: (Back row) Sarina Bains of Cresskill and Matthew Pontell of River Vale, recipients of Hackensack University Medical Center (HackensackUMC) and St. George’s University School of Medicine (SGUSOM) scholarship awards. (Front row) Ihor Sawczuk, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical officer, HackensackUMC; Charles R. Modica, chancellor, St. George’s University School of Medicine; Robert C. Garrett, president and chief executive officer, HackensackUMC; and Joseph Feldman, M.D., chairman of the Emergency Medicine Department, HackensackUMC, director of Medical Education for SGUSOM, HackensackUMC. Not pictured: Krishna Choksi and Nauman Ramay.

Pictured from left to right:
(Back row) Sarina Bains of Cresskill and Matthew Pontell of River Vale, recipients of Hackensack University Medical Center (HackensackUMC) and St. George’s University School of Medicine (SGUSOM) scholarship awards.
(Front row) Ihor Sawczuk, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical officer, HackensackUMC; Charles R. Modica, chancellor, St. George’s University School of Medicine; Robert C. Garrett, president and chief executive officer, HackensackUMC; and Joseph Feldman, M.D., chairman of the Emergency Medicine Department, HackensackUMC, director of Medical Education for SGUSOM, HackensackUMC. Not pictured: Krishna Choksi and Nauman Ramay.

These CityDoctors scholarships are a result of HackensackUMC’s academic partnership with St. George’s University in Grenada.  The scholarships awarded are for 50 percent tuition for the student’s remaining years of enrollment at the medical school as of August 2011.

“This year there were many qualified applicants, which made the selection process difficult,” said Joseph Feldman, MD SGUSOM ‘89, chairman of the Emergency Medicine Department at HackensackUMC and director of Medical Education for SGU at HackensackUMC.  “The candidates selected demonstrated academic achievement, practiced community volunteerism, indicated personal financial need and participated in various research projects. It is my honor to be on the selection committee and I believe we have selected worthy recipients,” he added.

“We are pleased to be able to offer this unique scholarship in partnership with HackensackUMC,” said Charles R. Modica, chancellor, St. George’s University School of Medicine. “The demand for primary care physicians has never been greater and the American Medical Association is predicting a shortage of 90,000 physicians by 2020.  St. George’s has been a major contributor to the solution of a doctor shortage, which has been growing for a long time.”

The scholarship is available to residents of Bergen County, NJ and HackensackUMC’s employees, immediate family members of the medical and dental staff or employee in good standing, who have been accepted to begin their first year of medical education at St. George’s University, Grenada.

The scholarship awards are named as follow and are awarded based on merit and/or financial need:

  • HackensackUMC employee scholarship: Chairman’s Scholarship in honor of the Chairman of
    the Boards at HackensackUMC
  • CEO Scholarship in honor of the President and CEO
  • Chairman of the Medical Executive Committee Scholarship
  • President of the Medical Executive Committee Scholarship

All applicants to CityDoctors – HackensackUMC must meet the following eligibility requirements:

  • Entering first year student at SGU
  • Copy of  the SGU acceptance letter must be provided
  • Applicants from Bergen County, NJ  must provide proof of address (non employees)
  • Submit copy of college transcripts
  • Copies of awards, abstracts and/or academic achievements
  • An essay (min. 500 words) describing why you should be considered for the scholarship based on one or more of the following listed below.
    • Outstanding academic achievement
    • Community Work
    • Leadership Roles
    • Financial Hardship

For more information on the HackensackUMC/SGUSOM Scholarship, please contact Sonia Gonzalez in the Office of Academic Affairs at SoniaGonzalez@HackensackUMC.org

About Hackensack University Medical Center
HackensackUMC, a non-profit teaching and research hospital located in Bergen County, New Jersey, is the largest provider of inpatient and outpatient services in the state, and home to the only Level II Trauma Center in the county. This 775-bed facility has gone beyond traditional thinking by creating an entire campus of care, including: the Heart & Vascular Hospital, the John Theurer Cancer Center, the Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital, and the Donna A. Sanzari Women’s Hospital. As a result of using science and creativity to push medicine further, HackensackUMC was listed as the number one hospital in New Jersey and one of the top four New York metro area hospitals by the U.S. News & World Report, and has received nine national rankings in: Cancer; Cardiology & Heart Surgery; Ear, Nose & Throat; Gastroenterology; Geriatrics; Neurology & Neurosurgery; Orthopedics; Urology; and the Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital ranked as one of the Top 25 Best Children’s Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery in the 2012-13 Best Children’s Hospitals list. The medical center has also been named one of the Thomson Reuters 100 Top Hospitals® and one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals by HealthGrades®. It is listed among the Leapfrog Top Hospitals List, received 17 Gold Seals of Approval™ by the Joint Commission, and is listed as one of the 50 Best Hospitals in America by Becker’s Hospital Review. It was first hospital in New Jersey and second in the nation to become a Magnet® recognized hospital for nursing excellence. The medical center is the hometown hospital of the New York Giants, and remains committed to its community through fundraising and community events. To learn more about one of the nation’s 50 best hospitals, visit: www.HackensackUMC.org.

St. George’s University Awards Scholarships To School of Medicine Class Of 2016

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Dustin St. George of Alexandria, Virginia, has been awarded the prestigious Legacy of Excellence Scholarship by St. George’s University School of Medicine. Mr. St. George is elated by the recognition and confidence St. George’s University has shown in him. “The LOE Scholarship means everything to me in terms of fulfilling my goals,” he said. “Being awarded the scholarship instilled a sense of pride and strength within me. It made me feel as if I was wanted at medical school and that I am capable of what lies before me.”

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St. George’s School of Medicine Graduate Becomes Floating Doctor

Hosts Four Day Clinic in Remote Panama Town with Non-Profit Committed to Providing Medical Care in Developing World

In an already remote town in Panama, Dr. Ravi Chokshi, SGUSOM ’12, and his colleagues from Floating Doctors, a not-for-profit organization committed to providing acute health care services and supplies to the developing world through mobile clinics, prepared for their next venture – a five-hour trek on foot to La Sabana, an even more isolated village in the mountains that was without access to clean running water or to basic health care.

2012 news floatingDuring its four-day clinic in the village, whose residents Dr. Chokshi called “outsiders in their own country,” Floating Doctors came to the aid of dozens of La Sabana villagers. The experience wasn’t only life-changing for them but for the doctors providing the treatment.

“It made me fall in love with medicine even more,” Dr. Chokshi said. “Every day there was so, so useful and we treated a lot of people. Training in the US is so rigorous and there’s so much paperwork, and sometimes you forget that medicine is cool and what we’re doing is really important. What you learn in medical school is so useful and the knowledge we have can do so much and help so many people.”

La Sabana was just one of many visits made in Central America by Floating Doctors, which was formed in 2008 by Dr. Benjamin LaBrot, his sister, Sky, and rehabilitation therapist Noah Haas, who make up the organization’s full-time staff.  It also employs rotating volunteers from all over the world; Dr. Chokshi’s group included volunteers from Australia, England and Sweden. Their roles ranged from dietitian to physical therapist and nurse.

Dr. Chokshi, who began his Obstetrics and Gynecology residency at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia in July, was able to address/assess women’s health care needs in La Sabana.

“Women’s health care is completely underserved in regions like this,” Dr. Chokshi said. “They aren’t at all aware of complications they may be having with their pregnancy. Even when a child is delivered normally, there’s a 5 to 10 percent infant mortality rate because they die of common childhood illnesses or related dehydration.”

For all treatments, Floating Doctors made do with whatever equipment and supplies it had on hand. In the case of one 12-year-old, Dr. Chokshi and Co., performed a tropical echocardiogram using a portable ultrasound, a test that would have cost $3,000 to $5,000 in the US. Their findings made it clear – the boy had a hole in his heart.

“I had examined 20 chests that day, listened to 20 hearts. But only his jumped at me as I lifted his shirt,” Dr. Chokshi wrote on his blog entry for FloatingDoctors.com.
Floating Doctors set up an appointment with a pediatric cardiologist in Panama City. The organization pledges not only to establish a connection with remote communities but maintain them long-term.

“They don’t want to do something once and never come back,” Dr. Chokshi said. “That’s not really health care. They want to build lasting relationships with all these communities so they begin to trust them more.”

In addition to receiving his education from an international faculty in Grenada, he is confident that, throughout his career, wherever he may go, he’ll always draw from his volunteer opportunity with Floating Doctors. Dr. Chokshi hopes to join up with the group once again when able.

It was a very valuable experience,” he said. “It was as international as medicine gets to me. It made me a better person and a better doctor.

Ojiaku Ikezuagu, M.D. joins South Central Iowa Medical Clinic

Dr. Ojiaku Ikezuagu, a 2005 graduate of St. George’s University School of Medicine, has been added to the staff at South Central Iowa Medical Clinic (SCIMC) in Corydon, Iowa. The clinic is one of five affiliated with Wayne County Hospital, a recipient of the Press Ganey Summit Award for patient satisfaction in 2009 and 2010. Dr. OJ, as he’s called, is board certified in family medicine. He completed his residency and training at Montgomery Hospital in Norristown, PA, in 2012, before joining the team at SCIMC.

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