Robert Alig Named New Vice President of Alumni Affairs

In November, St. George’s University named Robert Alig as its new vice president of alumni affairs, a role for which he looks forward to connecting with the more than 20,000 graduates across the Schools of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Graduate Studies. We sat down with Mr. Alig to discuss his background and the goals that he has for SGU and its alumni.

St. George’s University: What elements of your background sets you up to take the reins of alumni affairs at SGU?

Bob Alig: I was the assistant vice president of alumni relations at the University of Pennsylvania for seven years, overseeing alumni programming and engagement for its four undergraduate schools and all graduate programs. Prior to that, I was the director of MBA admissions and financial aid at the Wharton School, for which I was able to travel to 35 countries and share the message of a place that, as an alum, meant a great deal to me. I saw firsthand the energy, commitment, and enthusiasm of Penn’s alumni, not only to give back in terms of philanthropy, but also their time, talent and enthusiasm.

Collectively, I saw what we could accomplish when working in partnership, and what the advocacy of Penn alumni meant for the momentum of the university, anchored in strengthening its reputation and expanding its international footprint. I think this experience dovetails beautifully with what I’ve observed and learned during my brief tenure here.   SGU is on a remarkable trajectory and it has so much to be proud of. I am committed to an alumni relations effort that reflects the momentum and the diversity of the University.

SGU: What do you hope to accomplish in the first few months?

BA: I think it’s vital to connect with alumni to understand their own paths to SGU and what made it a special place for them. Listening and learning now, and agreeing on a plan that leverages our unique strengths will position us for success and continued momentum.   

It’s also important to help alumni understand how SGU can support them in their careers, in their continuing education, and at the same time, for them to advocate for SGU. In years past, education was thought of as an episodic period of time—you’re a student for four years and you get your degree. Now, I think it’s much more about a lifetime of learning and engagement. SGU can and should be the intellectual home of its alumni.

Sometimes I think about my role as helping several thousand current SGU students to feel like alumni, and helping 16,000 SGU alumni feel like students, reconnecting them with their experiences and what’s currently happening on our True Blue campus.

SGU: What do you view as the biggest challenge that faces alumni affairs here and in general?

BA: I think getting my arms around alumni data here is very similar to the challenge I faced when I started at Penn. Every higher education institution struggles with capturing data and using it effectively.

SGU: How can staying connected with SGU help our alumni in their careers?

BA: It makes perfect sense that we could keep our alumni engaged so that they can learn from each other and tap into each other’s networks and experiences. The pace of change in our work and personal lives has escalated significantly. The practice of radiology—or any field—has evolved dramatically in the last 15 years, so it’s important that our graduates not only stay current, but set the standard for the future through continuing education and engagement with their alma mater.

SGU: In what ways are you looking to connect with SGU alumni?

BA: There is nothing better than meeting SGU alumni in person, ideally on the True Blue campus, but I’ve also connected with alumni via social media, phone, and email, and want to continue to do so. I want to quickly figure out how we can connect and make it easy for them to stay in touch with me, their fellow alumni, and SGU.

American Veterinary Medical Association Renews Full Accreditation for St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine Through 2025

On November 5, Dr. Neil Olson, Dean of St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine, announced to students, faculty, and staff that the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE) has re-accredited the school through the year 2025—the maximum seven-year term for accreditation.

The AVMA COE first accredited St. George’s University in 2011. It is currently one of 19 AVMA-accredited schools outside the United States, and one of just two in the Caribbean.

“The AVMA is the gold standard of veterinary education globally, so to be fully accredited puts us right at the top in terms of the quality of training that we provide to our students,” said Dr. Olson. “We are right on the front edge of all vet schools in the Caribbean and on par with any vet school in the United States.”

AVMA accreditation means that SGU graduates can continue to sit for licensure to practice veterinary medicine in the United States or Canada without first completing a foreign graduate examination. It was recently reported that SGU graduates had posted a 95 percent pass rate on the 2017-18 North American Veterinary Licensing Examination (NAVLE).

In addition, US veterinary students may apply for lower-interest federal loans and in-school deferments through the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

“This is a major feather in our cap for the future recruitment of the best and brightest students from around the world,” Dr. Olson said. “It’s very important that students attend an accredited school, not only to ensure that they receive quality training but it also for the ability to fund their education.”

Dr. Olson joined SGU in August 2017 and continued the school’s preparation for the AVMA visit in April. In SGU’s self study, Dr. Olson assembled groups of faculty and staff that examined the 11 standards by which the AVMA measures schools—organization, finances, physical facilities and equipment, clinical resources, information resources, students, admission, faculty, curriculum, research programs, and outcomes assessment.

Dr. Neil Olson, Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine at St. George’s University

In addition, Dr. Olson, who served as Dean at the University of Missouri and Associate Dean at North Carolina State University prior to joining SGU, welcomed two colleagues to True Blue to perform a mock site visit in January.

“It’s important that our students have a strong foundation of knowledge skills underneath them when they set off for their careers as veterinarians,” Dr. Olson said. “We believe that we provide that foundation here at St. George’s University, and the backing of accrediting bodies such as the AVMA supports that belief.”

Since opening in 1999, St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine has produced close to 1,600 veterinarians who have gone on to practice in 49 United States and 16 countries worldwide. The School maintains partnerships with 29 universities and clinical facilities in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Grenada, Ireland, and Australia where fourth-year students spend a year of clinical training at an affiliated veterinary school.

SGU Students Register 95% Pass Rate on Veterinary Licensing Examination

St. George’s University’s veterinary medical students made the grade once more on the North American Veterinary Licensing Examination (NAVLE), posting a 95 percent pass rate on the exam in 2017-2018 according to the International Council for Veterinary Assessment (ICVA).

A student’s passing grade on the 360 multiple-choice-question test is required for licensure to practice veterinary medicine in the United States and Canada. Since 2000, ICVA has used the exam and other assessment tools “to protect the public, and animal health and welfare.”

“Our students’ success on the NAVLE is a testament to their commitment to their studies and to their future as veterinarians,” said Dr. Neil Olson, Dean of St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine. “Throughout their basic science and clinical years, they must endure a rigorous course load and absorb a wealth of information, and we’re pleased that the curriculum has adequately prepared them to meet the highest of practicing standards.”

SGU’s pass rate on the NAVLE compares favorably with other veterinary medical schools around the world. The pass rate for all criterion group examinees in the November/December 2017 and April 2018 periods was approximately 95 percent. To be an accredited college of veterinary medicine in good standing, the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE) requires that at least 80 percent of students who take the exam will have passed at the time of graduation.

SGU students have a proven track record of success on the NAVLE, including a 94 percent pass rate among test takers in 2016-2017.

“We congratulate our students for demonstrating that they are equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to have long and successful careers in veterinary medicine,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU. “We also salute our faculty and staff for helping to build a sturdy foundation for not only these students but for all of our graduates who are currently in practice.”

St. George’s University has produced more than 1,600 veterinarians since opening its doors in 1999. The SVM obtained full AVMA accreditation in 2011, and its graduates have gone on to practice in 49 US states and in 16 countries worldwide.

Future Veterinarians Embark on Unique SGU Experience Beginning With White Coat Ceremony

As veterinary medical students all across the United States recited the Oath of Professional Commitment at their own White Coat Ceremonies, Dr. Lauren Wise, Master of Ceremonies at St. George’s University, assured members of the Class of 2022 that although they would be held to the same exceptional standards as their counterparts abroad, their experience in Grenada would make them very unique veterinary medical students.

“You now live in one of the most beautiful places in the world. Embrace it and love every second of it,” said Dr. Wise, Associate Professor, Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, SGU. “For the next three years, you get to be a part of a culture that is fascinating and has a rich history. The people are proud and friendly, and they want you to be a part of this community while you’re here. So, don’t stay in your dorm room, get out there.

“The last thing that sets you apart is that you’re far away from home,” she added. “However, it’s going to make you be more resilient, stronger, and you’re going to form life-long friendships.”

Dr. Jack Hammett and his wife Denise traveled more than 2,000 miles from Spotsylvania, Virginia to sit among the proud family members and friends in attendance at the Fall 2018 SVM White Coat Ceremony. Dr. Hammett has spent over 30 years in mixed animal practice, and the last 15 in equine small animal. The proud dad who had the honor of coating his son, Jared, on stage during the ceremony was among 11 SGU graduates who returned for this fall’s SOM and SVM White Coat Ceremonies.

“My son has worked with me in the practice for years, gone everywhere with me, and he’s such a great young man,” praised Dr. Hammett. “When trying to describe how I felt coating my son, words fail me. I’m so proud of him. He’s done such a great job so far and I have great expectations for him. I was ecstatic for him when I found out he got accepted to SGU. I’ve practiced veterinary medicine for decades and there’s nothing else I’d rather do. It’s just a great profession and a great and fulfilling way to serve the community.”

“I’ve always wanted to be a veterinarian—ever since I was small and going on farm calls with my dad,” shared Jared Hammett. “I’ve been working at his clinic during my summer breaks from college for the past three years, so I’ve seen firsthand that being a vet is the best job in the world.”

Echoing this sentiment was the evening’s keynote speaker, Dr. Andrew T. Maccabe, Chief Executive Officer of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC).

“Be curious, not complacent, be skeptical, but not cynical and keep wondering because the world is full of wonder and you’re about to embark on a wonderful career,” Dr. Maccabe said.

The Class of 2022 will work toward joining the more than 1,600 graduates of SGU’s School of Veterinary Medicine, which accepted its first class in August 1999. The School has since gained full accreditation from the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and the Small Animal Clinic became the second practice outside the United States and Canada to earn American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) accreditation. The AVMA Council on Education will conduct a site visit this April, as part of the reaccreditation process for the School of Veterinary Medicine.

– Ray-Donna Peters

St. George’s University Welcomes Dr. Richard Liebowitz as New Vice Chancellor

Today, St. George’s University announced that Dr. Richard Liebowitz will assume the role of Vice Chancellor effective September 17.

As Vice Chancellor, Liebowitz will be the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at St. George’s University, with responsibility for all academic affairs at the Schools of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Graduate Studies, and Arts and Sciences. He will work closely with faculty and staff as well as members of the senior leadership team to promote student success, faculty development, and academic excellence.

“We’re thrilled to welcome Dr. Liebowitz to the St. George’s University community,” said Charles Modica, Chancellor and Co-Founder of St. George’s University. “We’re fortunate to be able to add someone with his depth of experience in academic medicine, clinical training, and strategic development to our leadership team.”

“St. George’s University has produced thousands of graduates who have distinguished themselves as leaders in medicine, veterinary science, and other fields,” Liebowitz said. “I look forward to advancing the work of St. George’s University, upholding the highest standards of academic excellence, and preparing our students for lives of service and leadership.”

Liebowitz most recently served as president of NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. Before taking the helm, he also served as senior vice president and chief medical officer at NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Center, one of the leading academic medical centers in the world.

Previously, Liebowitz served as medical director of strategic initiatives and network business development at Duke University Health System; section chief of general medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine; and medical director of the Massachusetts-based Fallon Clinic. He has been deputy editor of the Archives of Internal Medicine and is also a fellow of the American College of Physicians.

“Our students will benefit enormously from the insight that Dr. Liebowitz has gleaned from his decades of experience leading major hospital systems,” St. George’s University President Dr. G. Richard Olds said. “He’s the ideal person to help our students prepare for successful careers in medicine and the sciences, and I am eager to begin working with him.”

St. George’s University and Felician University Announce Medical and Veterinary Educational Partnership

St. George’s University and Felician University have launched a program that will allow qualified applicants to Felician to receive early admission to the medical or veterinary schools at St. George’s.

“We are excited to welcome Felician University’s best and brightest to our campus in Grenada,” Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University, said. “This partnership will allow aspiring doctors and veterinarians to focus on their studies at Felician, secure in the knowledge that they’ll have a spot reserved for them in our medical or veterinary school.”

Students who wish to pursue one of the combined degree programs apply to Felician. St. George’s will consult with Felician on their applications and conduct interviews with qualified candidates. The universities will jointly makes offers for the combined program.

According to Dr. Anne Prisco, President of Felician University, “Several Felician students have attended St. George’s University. This partnership expands our relationship to a new level and provides our incoming students who qualify for this program the peace of mind they need to focus their efforts on preparing for their professional studies.”

In order to proceed to the St. George’s University School of Medicine, Felician students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.4 and an MCAT score within three points of the previous term’s average score at St. George’s. To be eligible to continue onto the St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine, Felician students must have a grade point average of at least 3.1 and a GRE score of at least 300. A letter of recommendation from the appropriate Felician University faculty is also required.

Medical students will complete their first two years of medical study in Grenada and then undertake two years of clinical training at hospitals affiliated with St. George’s in the United States or the United Kingdom.

Students pursuing degrees in veterinary medicine will study in Grenada for three years and spend their final clinical year at affiliated universities in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Ireland, or Australia.

Felician University joins a network of dozens of institutes of higher learning in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom that have teamed up with St. George’s to offer students an accelerated path to a career as a doctor or veterinarian.

“It’s a privilege to educate the next generation of doctors and veterinarians,” Dr. Olds said. “These future graduates of Felician and St. George’s will play a critical role in addressing the world’s most pressing health challenges.”

For Students, Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy Is a Glimpse of Their Future

For the past 16 years, St. George’s University’s Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy has provided college and high school students from around the world with an insider’s view of medical or veterinary medical school. This summer, more than 80 aspiring physicians and veterinarians were provided with insight into their future professions to help them make a well-informed decision before fully committing to such rigorous careers.

Successfully balancing a challenging academic program with extracurricular activities selected to highlight the culture and innate beauty of Grenada, the Summer Academy program offers courses that combine didactic lectures, small-group problem-solving sessions, practical lab work in state-of-the art facilities, and hands-on training through simulated and real-life situations.

Attending this year’s program was Pranav Lakhan, a 16-year-old student from Mumbai, India who traveled to Grenada from Paris, France. Mr. Lakhan enrolled in the Academy with hopes of interacting and gaining insight from existing students on what he would be experiencing in a few years when he enters medical school.

“I think the Summer Academy is an invaluable platform for aspiring medical professionals to get experience while still in school, which is an absolutely rare opportunity,” said Mr. Lakhan, who was one of more than a dozen Academy attendees who hailed from India. “We visited the labs for anatomy, suturing, and ultrasounds, which was mind blowing. I felt like I was a real medical student in medical school. Although the pressure may be a little overwhelming at first, it was still an amazing experience that just filled you with knowledge and all you had to do was absorb it. I think this program gives you a good indication of what medical school will actually be like. To any aspiring students that want to come here, it’s an absolutely surreal experience.”

Also, participating in the Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy was 16-year-old Reet Kohli, a 12thgrade student also visiting from India. Coming from a family of doctors, Ms. Kohli has known since sixth grade that she wanted to become a doctor. Enrolling in the Summer Academy gave her a closer look into the practical aspects of the profession that she expects to pursue.

“This was my first time traveling alone, but once I got here it has been a really fun experience,” Ms. Kohli said. “I feel at home in Grenada. It is such a beautiful place. My parents were very supportive of me coming here and very happy that I was going to get this opportunity. In India, we are taught from the textbooks, so although we know what a cadaver is, to actually see one in real life was a truly great experience. Getting to wear a stethoscope, using all the equipment that doctors use and hearing the professors refer to you as ‘doctor’ is just an amazing feeling. This experience has given me more confidence that yes, this is what I want to do with my life. Putting on those scrubs, I can imagine myself living in them for the rest of my life.”

Heather Brathwaite, who has directed the Met-Vet Summer Leadership Academy for the last 13 years, has seen many of the students come full circle.

“It’s been an amazing opportunity and very rewarding to be able to see the students come to the program and then later come back as enrolled students at SGU,” added Ms. Brathwaite. “Many of these same students also come back to work for the Summer Academy while they’re studying at SGU.”

“One of the major goals of the Academy is to help students decide whether this is the path they want to choose,” she added. “With a mix of academic and fun activities, they go to lectures and labs just like our regular SGU medical and veterinary students do. They receive one-on-one attention, working closely with our actual SGU faculty who provide hands-on experience utilizing equipment and materials that most students their age would not have the chance to.”

– Ray-Donna Peters

2018 Class of Veterinary Graduates Celebrates at New York’s Lincoln Center

On Saturday at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall in New York City, animals around the world, both big and small, officially gained some of their strongest caretakers and advocates. With their family and friends in attendance, St. George’s University graduates were conferred the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and will now continue their careers throughout the United States and beyond.

“What you’ve done and given up to be here today has made your family proud,” St. George’s University Chancellor Charles Modica said. “You’ve made it through a very strenuous program with great perseverance. We at SGU have the utmost respect for all of you.”

This year’s graduates hail from such countries as the United States, Canada, Bermuda, United Kingdom, Israel, South Africa, and Hong Kong. They join an alumni network that now includes more than 1,500 veterinarians.

“For us, this ceremony is a symbol of confidence that you are now equipped for the world into which you are entering,” said Dr. Glen Jacobs, Provost of SGU. “We have equipped you with the basic skills necessary for your profession, and you must continue learning to keep pace with the changing world around us. Your academic qualifications will help to open opportunities, but beyond that, you must demonstrate your ability to learn and grow in the fields you choose.”

Among the new grads was Kendra Simons, DVM SGU ’18, who came to St. George’s University from Bermuda, navigating through four years of school to fulfill her dream of becoming a veterinarian. After officially earning her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in January, she began working as an associate veterinarian position at Avon Animal Hospital in Windsor, Nova Scotia.

Dr. Simons celebrated in New York with her parents and two siblings, as well as several other family members and friends, all of whom supported her on her journey.

“It’s very surreal to be here today,” she said. “It’s great to see all of my classmates because we took on a very difficult challenge and came out on the other end.”

She was joined at the ceremony by Matt Cochran, DVM SGU ’18, who at a young age envisioned becoming a small animal veterinarian but gravitated toward working with horses over time. Dr. Cochran looks forward to continuing his career in equine medicine, having earned an internship at Tennessee Equine Hospital in Thompson’s Station, TN.

“I’m excited to get going,” he said. “I have a great team at Tennessee Equine. They have a really nice structure set up, and I look forward to working with them, learning from them, and applying everything I learned at SGU.”

In addition to robing its newest class of veterinarians, the University’s highest honor—the Distinguished Service Medal—was awarded to Dr. Timothy Ogilvie, Dean Emeritus of the School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Ogilvie served as a longtime visiting professor at SGU before being appointed dean in January 2014. During his tenure, he played a vital role in preparing the SVM for its re-accreditation by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Dr. Ogilvie stepped down as Dean in the summer of 2017, handing the reins to Dr. Neil Olson, but remains with the University as Vice Provost of Advancement for the SVM.

– Brett Mauser

Veterinary Anesthesia Leaders From Around the World Descend on Grenada for AVA Meeting

St. George’s University served as the center of a worldwide veterinary anesthesia discussion as more than 100 veterinary experts traveled to Grenada for the semi-annual Association of Veterinary Anesthetists (AVA) conference. Customarily held in Europe where the organization was founded, the Spring 2018 meeting however marked the first time in the organization’s history that the conference was held in the Caribbean.

“We are very proud to be sponsoring this congress here in Grenada. It’s a wonderful opportunity to showcase not only SGU but also our beautiful island,” said Dr. Neil Olson, Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. “St. George’s provides the perfect platform for members of the veterinary anesthesia community to collaborate and offers great levels of exposure to different veterinary professionals from around the world. Hosting the AVA group also speaks to the quality of our vet school and to our presence throughout the globe.”

Themed “Anesthesia and Analgesia—Myths and Misconceptions,” the three-day conference featured lectures and abstract sessions from a wide range of delegates. Presentations included “Evaluating recovery of horses from anesthesia: moving beyond the subjective” by Dr. Stuart Clark-Price, Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine; “Safe anesthesia in young children: what really matters” by Prof. Markus Weiss, Anesthesiologist-in-Chief, University Children’s Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland; and “Pain in Mice and Man: Ironic Adventures in Translation” by Dr. Jeffrey Mogil, Canada Research Chair in the Genetics of Pain at McGill University.

“I’m increasingly speaking at veterinary meetings I presume because of the Mouse Grimace Scale, which has gotten me the attention of the veterinary research world,” stated Dr. Mogil. “Although most of my talks are to a human anesthesiologist audience, I enjoy even more speaking to veterinary groups than neurologists, psychologists, and anesthesiologists. This is because I get to see firsthand how interested people in other research communities are to what I study, and the questions and feedback are always completely different and usually more useful than what I get from the standard audiences.

“Additionally, this is also a lovely opportunity for me to branch out, and on the other hand, I get to give a veterinary audience like this something that is beyond the usual affair and hopefully useful for their thinking as well.”

Dr. Karin Kalchofner Guerrero, Associate Professor in Veterinary Anesthesia at St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine, served as Chair of the Local Organizing Committee, working diligently to arrange the meeting for which SGU and the Radisson Grenada Beach Resort in Grand Anse served as hosts.

“We are extremely pleased with the success of this event, which proved to be beneficial for both the AVA and SGU,” commented Dr. Guerrero. “We received plenty of positive feedback, with attendees complimenting our scientific program, the social events and of course the beauty and hospitality of Grenada. Additionally, many of our European participants were first-time visitors to Grenada and the Caribbean, therefore we hosted the first two days of the meeting on the SGU campus, giving them a chance to visit our picturesque University’s grounds and to interact with faculty, staff, and students.”

Usually convening in such locations as Paris, France; Helsinki, Finland; and most recently in Berlin, Germany, the AVA meeting provides a venue for veterinary interns, residents, and practitioners to exchange ideas, expand their knowledge, and develop new skills. The AVA Autumn 2018 meeting will be the World Congress of Veterinary Anesthesiology (WCVA), which takes place every three years and is scheduled for Venice, Italy, followed by the Spring 2019 meeting to be held in Bristol, United Kingdom.

– Ray-Donna Peters

Historic Student Exchange Program Established With Konkuk University in Seoul

Konkuk University in downtown Seoul, South Korea

Konkuk University in Seoul, South Korea, has signed an agreement with St. George’s University to enable students of veterinary medicine from each university to enter a one-year exchange program. Each institution will send to the other up to five students per academic year. The agreement, the first of its kind between education institutions in the two countries, recognizes the educational and cultural exchanges which can be achieved between the universities.

The program is open to third-year veterinary medical students, with those who enroll from Konkuk moving to study for one year at SGU in Grenada, and those from SGU studying on campus at Konkuk University in Seoul. Students will be provided with the same academic resources and support services that are available to all students at the host institution.

The agreement will bring mutual benefits both for SGU and Konkuk University, as well as for Grenada and the Republic of Korea. The universities agree to establish educational relations and cooperation in order to promote academic linkages and to enrich the understanding of the culture of both countries. The cooperation will further promote collaborative research, educational developments, and greater mutual understanding, to the advantage of students and the veterinary profession.

“The Government of Grenada is pleased to see the strengthening of academic and cultural links between our country and the Republic of Korea,” said the Hon. Simon Stiell, Grenada’s Minister for Education & Human Resource. “Students from SGU have a valuable opportunity to spend a year studying in Korea, and I encourage them to do so. Equally, those students from Konkuk who come to Grenada can be assured of an enriching experience. They will be welcomed with open arms.”

Commenting on the agreement, Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University, said: “This agreement will enable students of veterinary medicine from Konkuk and SGU to gain valuable experience studying in a variety of international settings. This is positive for both the students involved and for the veterinary profession as a whole. We look forward to welcoming students from Konkuk University to our campus.”

Dr. Sanggi Min, President of Konkuk University, said: “In signing a Memorandum of Understanding with St. George’s University, we have provided students from both institutions with the opportunity to benefit from world-leading veterinary training. Those who enroll will find both academic and cultural enrichment, and I look forward to the exchange program continuing for many years.

St. George’s University is affiliated with education institutions worldwide, including the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and Ireland. Students studying at SGU program will be able to take advantage of these institutional links, resulting in qualified healthcare practitioners with a truly global medical education.