SGU Dean of Basic Sciences Elected President of American Association of Clinical Anatomists

As a medical student at the University of Warsaw, Marios Loukas joined the American Association of Clinical Anatomists in 1997. Since then, the Dean of Basic Sciences and Professor in the Department of Anatomical Sciences at St. George’s University has been committed to teaching and studying anatomy, calling it the “foundation knowledge” for all physicians, as well as the foundation for his own career in medicine, academia, and research.

At the AACA annual meeting in Minneapolis last month, the organization’s members elected Dr. Loukas as its 18th president, 20 years since his entry into the AACA. In his new role, Dr. Loukas hopes to expand the visibility of anatomists across the scientific community, improve faculty development, and increase student membership. In addition, he aims to create a clinical anatomists certificate program that recognizes individuals’ excellence and dedication in the field of clinical anatomy.

“In anatomy, you not only learn what makes up the human body, but you learn the clinical application behind every bone, organ, nerve, artery, and more,” said Dr. Loukas.

Through his affiliation with the AACA, he met Drs. Peter Abrahams, Vishnu Rao, and Robert Jordan, who invited him to join SGU as an Associate Professor of Anatomy in 2005. Dr. Loukas has ascended to his current roles within the Department, and also serves as the University’s Dean of Basic Sciences and Research.

While the study of anatomy dates back thousands of years, Dr. Loukas said the most contemporary method of studying human anatomy is imaging—specifically ultrasound—for which the human body “comes to life.” Beginning in 2011, SGU integrated ultrasound education in its curriculum, with training sessions complementing relevant material taught in lectures, wet labs, and small-group discussion sessions. An additional outcome of such integration is availability of research opportunities for students and faculty. This year, five SGU medical students presented ultrasound research at the AACA meeting, including second-year student Jenna Kroeker, who was recognized for the best clinical anatomy poster presentation among 120 submissions.