The Therapeutic Value of Hypnosis

Throughout the history of hypnotherapy, stage hypnotists have awed and delighted onlookers with their ability to control their subjects’ minds. There have been consequences however; many believe that stage hypnosis, often seen as humiliating its subjects, has undermined the credibility and therefore the therapeutic benefits of clinical hypnosis.

Dr. Zoita Mandila, Hon. Secretary at the British Society of Clinical and Academic Hypnosis (BSCAH), recently presented a CME lecture titled “Clinical Hypnosis – Changing from the Ordinary to Extraordinary” at St. George’s University. A dental clinician for more than 17 years, Dr. Mandila and her colleagues at the BSCAH described clinical hypnosis as the safe and responsible use of hypnosis in medicine, dentistry, and psychology for its therapeutic value when treating an array of psychological, emotional, and physical problems.

“I have been using clinical hypnosis for the past six years and I have to say it has changed the way I practice,” praised Dr. Mandila. “My goal here is to allow clinicians to see that hypnosis is really a tool for them. It could change the framework that they use in the clinical setting. This tool can help them to improve their relationship with patients, and how they perform their clinical treatment—allowing the patient to be much more relaxed and achieve a faster and easier recovery.”

According to Dr. Mandila, it is important to understand the difference between stage hypnosis, performed for entertainment in a club or at a party, and clinical hypnosis, induced in a private office setting for therapeutic benefit. The clinical hypnotherapist relies on his or her knowledge of the human psyche, a caring and compassionate manner, an understanding of the phenomena surrounding hypnosis, and clients who are prepared to accept help with the change they seek.

Additionally, she explains that hypnosis can’t make you do anything unwillingly. Hypnotherapists can’t change a patient’s beliefs and behaviors with a snap of their fingers. Dr. Mandila maintains that the patient is in full control at all times.

“The stage hypnotist uses hypnosis for entertainment. We do it to help people. We do it to make them better, which is a much more humanitarian scope for it,” she stated. “The techniques are a little similar, but we provide the best care for our patients.”