Rutgers New Jersey Medical School Dean Delivers Annual Bourne Lecture at St. George’s University

Dr. Robert Johnson MD, Dean of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, delivers the 23rd annual Geoffrey H. Bourne Memorial Lecture.

The success of an institution and its personnel can hinge on the professional culture it creates, this according to Dr. Robert L. Johnson, The Sharon and Joseph L. Muscarelle Endowed Dean at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS) and keynote speaker at the 23rd Annual Geoffrey Bourne Memorial Lecture.

Dr. Johnson, who also serves as Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine at NJMS, gave the presentation titled “Professionalism in Health Care” at Charter Hall before dozens of hospital administrators who were attending SGU’s annual clinical meetings.

“I think that in these days, it is one of the most important things that we can do,” Dr. Johnson said. “We need to be in charge of that. Many of the things that we used to be in charge of, we aren’t in charge of anymore. Only the profession can adequately define professionalism, set the standards, and make sure that we all adhere to them.”

The Latin phrase “primum non nocere” – or “first, do no harm” – is still the bedrock of the profession, but increased attention is devoted to creating and maintaining a professional workplace, and teaching the principles outlined in “Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter,” a groundbreaking research study conducted by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation, the American College of Physicians (ACP)-American Society of Internal Medicine (ASIM) Foundation, and the European Federation of Internal Medicine in 2002. The Charter consisted of three fundamental principles – primacy of patient welfare, patient autonomy, and social justice – as well as 10 commitments ranging from honesty and confidentiality to professional competence and improving access to care.

Such commitments to the profession start at the top and are passed down to students not only through communication but observation, what Dr. Johnson called “the hidden curriculum.”

“What students really learn from their professors is not only based on what they say but what they do,” Dr. Johnson said. “They learn to be doctors as a result of mimicking what you do – how you talk to your patients, how you handle problems, how you handle mistakes, and how you talk to each other.”

He also stressed the importance of setting expectations for students through ceremonial events, written documents, and training, with assessments and remediation done based on their performance.

“People come to us with a variety of experiences and backgrounds that determine how they will acquire and administer new material,” Dr. Johnson said. “You must have a process for identifying problems and remediating them.”

In addition to his roles at NJMS, Dr. Johnson chairs the New Jersey Governor’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS and Related Blood-Borne Pathogens, as well as the Newark Ryan White Planning Council. He has previously served as the President of the New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners, the Chair of the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Council on Graduate Medical Education. Dr. Johnson joins a decorated list of Bourne speakers that includes Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and neurology pioneer Lord Walton of Detchant. The lecture series is named for St. George’s University’s first Vice Chancellor, Dr. Geoffrey H. Bourne, an educator, scientist, writer, and visionary who helped guide the University in its early development.

St. George’s University Approved by Georgia Composite Medical Board

The Georgia Composite Medical Board (GCMB) has approved St. George’s University, allowing its third- and fourth-year medical students to conduct their clinical training in the Peach State. In addition to the GCMB endorsement, SGU has created a partnership with DeKalb Medical Network, an agreement that facilitates clinical education opportunities at the organization’s three Atlanta-area hospitals.

“We are excited to continue expanding our network of affiliated hospitals in order to offer our students an array of clinical experiences,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President and CEO of St. George’s University. “This approval and this new partnership represent key cogs in our growing educational network.”

The Georgia Composite Medical Board licenses physicians and other medical professionals within the state. GCMB representatives visited the True Blue campus for four days in August, evaluating the University’s mission, programs, facilities and more. With its approval, Georgia becomes one of 12 US states in which SGU clinical students can obtain training, joining Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New York, and New Jersey, as well as Washington, DC. Outside the US, clinical rotations are available in Canada, the United Kingdom, and Grenada.

“SGU students can benefit greatly from rotating in a wide variety of locations and fields,” said Dr. Daniel Ricciardi, MD SGU ’81, Dean of Clinical Studies at St. George’s University. “By learning from leading physicians across several different state-of-the-art facilities, they can gain experience and perspective that, upon graduating, will only enhance the quality of care they provide in their own practice.”

In addition to its approval from the GCMB, SGU has created a partnership with DeKalb Medical Network, which opens up clinical education opportunities to the University’s third- and fourth-year students. DeKalb’s hospitals have more than 600 acute care beds and provide specialty care through an emergency department as well as cancer, orthopedic, and wellness centers.

“Our partnership with DeKalb Medical Network will provide hundreds of our students the opportunity to learn and practice medicine at a very high level,” said Dr. Stephen Weitzman, Dean of St. George’s University School of Medicine. “These hospitals are ideal environments for young doctors to take on their first responsibilities in the field.”

Through these clerkships, students can obtain hands-on exposure to all medical roles in a hospital. Each clinical center can accommodate as many as 100 students, who can enroll in sub-internships, up to five rotations, and elective courses.

More Than 860 St. George’s University Graduates Garner US Residency Positions on Match Day 2017

Match Day was yet another success for St. George’s University and its graduates, with more than 860 students and alumni securing first-year residency positions at highly competitive programs across the United States through the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP).

SGU alumni will report to PGY1 residency programs in the following specialties this summer: anesthesiology, child neurology, diagnostic radiology, emergency medicine, family medicine, internal medicine, internal medicine/neurology, internal medicine/pediatrics, neurological surgery, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, orthopaedic surgery, pathology, pediatrics, pediatrics/emergency medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation, psychiatry, surgery, thoracic surgery, urology, and vascular surgery. Residencies were secured across the United States as well as in the District of Columbia. In addition to Match Day, one student matched in January’s San Francisco Match, and seven more through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) earlier this month.

“We applaud the 2017 class for its dedication and drive, from the first day of basic sciences to their clinical rotations,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President and CEO of St. George’s University. “We look forward to seeing them enjoy long and successful careers in their chosen field, providing high-quality health care for communities throughout the United States and Canada. I also wish to congratulate the hundreds of graduates who are planning to train internationally.”

Many SGU graduates obtained positions in their top-choice positions and at highly competitive programs. Among them was Spencer Leong, who matched into the internal medicine residency program at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

“I would have been happy going to any of the programs I had on my rank list, but Tennessee was my first choice,” he said. “It’s a great IM program in a beautiful city along the river, and it’s just two hours from where my parents live. I’m really excited to officially finish my rotations in five weeks and to get started.”

Sannoor Surani described herself as “absolutely ecstatic” shortly after learning that she had secured an anesthesiology position at her top-choice program – Boston University Medical Center. Although she grew up in Texas, she looks forward to practicing in a city that she calls “the hub of medicine.”

“So many innovations come out of Boston, and the environment is so stimulating with so many brilliant minds,” she said. “It’s where I wanted to be, and I couldn’t be happier. If not for SGU, I wouldn’t be here because it gave me an opportunity that I didn’t otherwise have. It was a great experience, and it gave me all the tools and resources I needed to be successful.”

On Match Day, Dan O’Connor discovered that he will return to his native Minnesota this summer to begin a family medicine residency at St. Cloud Hospital in St. Cloud, Minnesota. He had enjoyed his medicine rotation at St. Cloud, and interviewed for a residency position before leaving. It was and has always been his top choice.

“From when I first went to SGU, this has always been my dream,” O’Connor said. “I’ll be around my family and friends, and I’ll be doing what I love, so I’m very happy about it.”

Since opening in 1977, St. George’s University has graduated more than 14,000 physicians who have gone on to practice in all 50 US states and more than 50 countries worldwide. According to published information, SGU has placed more doctors in first-year postgraduate positions than any medical school in the last six years combined, including more than 880 placements at US and Canadian residency programs in 2016.

Stay tuned as SGU is learning each day about more postgraduate positions gained through the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) or outside of the Match entirely. For a complete list of 2017 residency appointments to date, visit the SGU postgraduate appointment page.

Dr. Nadia Lopez Presents at 3rd SGU Principals and Teachers Forum

By attending the 3rd SGU Principals and Teachers Forum, more than 150 secondary and primary school educators were able to engage in critical dialogue on issues that impact their schools’ success and the major role they play in the development of Grenada’s most valuable capital – its children.

Held at Allen Pensick Hall on March 7, the event was the brainchild of Dr. Allen Pensick, Provost Emeritus of SGU, who encouraged the University’s administration to host a series of workshops that provided Grenadian instructors with an opportunity to empower themselves and improve the quality of education on the island as a whole.

“Teachers have extraordinary commitment. First of all, you’re committed to your students. The fact that you’re here today to discuss ideas and new ways and techniques to extend your own expertise to them – that speaks volumes,” said Dr. Joseph Childers, Provost, SGU. “Also, you’re committed to learning, to making yourself better, to learn to communicate better, to learn new approaches, and to learn from each other. But mostly, I want to thank you for your commitment to the future because what you do is perhaps the most important thing anyone can do. You are visionaries, and you are helping to shape our future.”

Delivering an inspirational keynote address, encompassing this year’s theme “Empowering Teacher Leaders”, Dr. Nadia Lopez is pioneering a path of outstanding leadership carrying her message to classrooms far from Brooklyn of how under-privileged communities can beat the odds and create positive institutions that have a global impact.

“My vision was to open a school to close a prison. So that every child will be able to take over this world, become globally competitive, and know that they have value,” shared Dr. Lopez, Principal, Mott Hall Bridges Academy, Brooklyn, NY. “My goals were to find teachers who are passionate about teaching, have compassion for the community they serve, and a willingness to learn; to ensure that students receive social and emotional support so they can access knowledge with confidence and develop strategies to navigate life; and to build partnerships that support learning and teaching, by providing resources for access and opportunities.”

As the Academy’s founding principal, Dr. Lopez rose to international fame after the popular photoblog, Humans of New York (HONY), featured one of her students touting her as the most influential person in his life. Millions of people around the world learned of the positive learning environment, high expectations, and growing success rate at a school right in the middle of one of the most underserved communities in America. Her success story was shared through numerous media outlets and resulted in Dr. Lopez’s guest appearance on the Ellen Show, a visit with President Barack Obama at the White House, and receiving the Medal of Distinction from Barnard College.

“As part of SGU’s educational outreach to the community of Grenada, it is important for us to work with our principals and teachers and support them in matters such as strengthening leadership,” commented Dr. Glen Jacobs, Vice Provost of Educational Services at SGU. “That’s why we felt it so necessary to have Dr. Lopez here to share her experience of not having many resources and how important it was for our educators to hear how she did it anyway.”

This year’s Principals Forum built on the success of last year’s event, more than doubling its attendance. “Considering that many of the Grenadian students may become future students at SGU, we believe that the more help we can provide in educating and empowering our school leaders, the better for everyone,” said Dr. Jacobs.”

St. George’s University Welcomes Families From Around the World at Beyond Spice Family Weekend

Hemant and Rajul Gandhi traveled from Long Island, New York, along with many other families from North America, the Caribbean, and Europe to St. George’s University’s picturesque True Blue Campus to attend the 13th Beyond Spice Family Weekend in January.

“This was our first time visiting the Spice Isle so we spent time exploring the island’s history and  enjoying the natural beauty and cultural heritage of Grenada,” shared Mr. Gandhi. “I was very proud to learn that my son, Jason, was accepted to St. George’s not only because it’s an excellent school, but also because its environment is beautiful.”

The bi-annual Family Weekend festivities included guided campus tours, the historical sightseeing tour of Fort Frederick, the famous Grand Etang Lake, and the 30-foot Annandale Waterfalls.

“We highly recommend that any family members who have  an opportunity to experience Family Weekend should do it,” praised Mrs. Gandhi. “The island is beautiful, the campus is amazing, and the food is great, but most importantly, Jason is happy and he loves it here and that is all that matters to us.”

The weekend also coincided with the White Coat Ceremonies for the entering MD and DVM class. This allows families to take advantage of all that Family Weekend has to offer without missing the special event that marks their students’ entry into the medical or veterinary profession. Students and their families attended a weekend full of activities throughout campus and the island, prior to the momentous White Coat Ceremony.

“Family Weekend serves as more than an occasion to bring families together; it is a chance to showcase the diversity of the University’s student body and welcome families from across the globe to the SGU family,” stated Colin Dowe, Associate Dean of Enrolment Planning. “The weekend’s events also display St. George’s deeply held commitment to education and development through its collective vision for success.”

Family Weekend Fall 2017 is set for September 1-3. Learn more about the festivities by visiting the Family Weekend webpage or by emailing familyweekend@sgu.edu.

School of Arts and Sciences Welcomes New Class of Nursing Students at Spring 2017 Nursing Induction Ceremony

Aspiring nurses were recently inducted into St. George’s University School of Arts and Sciences Nursing Program, and marking their entry into the profession were presented with lamps as a symbol of the care and devotion administered by nurses around the world.

“You are about to enter a profession that is held in high regard across the globe. Take all of the opportunities that are open to you. It may seem a long journey but embrace it. You’ve done a lot of work to even sit here at the start of this journey,” praised Master of Ceremonies, Mrs. Jennifer Solomon, RN and Chair and Director, Nursing and Allied Health, SGU.”

In addition to being welcomed into the School of Arts and Sciences by Acting Dean, Dr. John Swartz, the incoming class was also greeted by recently appointed Provost of SGU, Dr. Joseph Childers. “I want to congratulate all of you on your personal and professional choice,” commended Dr. Childers.  “As nurses, you will be the first line of care for patients. You will be that connection between the doctor and the patient. That is an extraordinary responsibility and I congratulate you on choosing this career and taking on that responsibility.”

Mrs. Hazelene Benjamin, Acting Director of Nursing Services, General Hospital, Grenada and the keynote speaker, focused on the evolving roles of nurses and the challenges of a diverse, complex health care system.

“Over the years, nursing has become more complex in ways that could not have been imagined a generation ago. Now there is an imperative to not just be great caregivers, but great innovators too. Nursing is now a profession for the intellectually curious, the life-long learner, the caring enthusiast, and the innovative advocate,” stated Mrs. Benjamin.

“Today nurses are not only empowered to face the associated health care challenges, but are better prepared and able to play a significant role in the transformation of health care systems nationally, regionally, and internationally.”

“As future nurses, today marks the beginning of your journey into the beautiful, exciting and rewarding career of service filled with wonderful opportunities and possibilities. The sky is the limit,” promised Mrs. Benjamin. “Your attitude will determine your altitude of success. Go light your candle of service, go light your world,  and be an outstanding trailblazer.”

About St. George’s University Nursing Program

Uniquely structured, the Nursing Program at St. George’s provides an opportunity for students to be taught by professors from both the School of Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences, as well as visiting professors from outside of Grenada. In addition, student nurse training experiences will include working at the Grenada General Hospital, lab work at SGU’s Simulation Center, and community-based learning opportunities. At the end of training, and with the completion of regional and international licensing exams, successful students will become fully fledged Registered Nurses as approved by the Caribbean Nursing Council.

St. George’s University Celebrates 40 Years of Excellence in International Education

St. George’s University’s highly anticipated 40th anniversary celebration kicked off with a weekend of festivities for which all those who helped author its incredible story—everyone from the faculty and staff to its more than 17,000 graduates — were invited.

SGU’s impact on health care, veterinary medicine, business, and many other fields has been felt both near and far. Close to home, SGU hasplayed and continues to play a large role in transforming the country of Grenada. In addition to contributing millions of dollars to the country’s economy, it is also one of the largest employers of Grenadians on the island, second only to the Government of Grenada. Similarly, SGU is also responsible for transforming education in the region, offering a tertiary education opportunity that has resulted in 1,200 Grenadian alumni, with more than 200 MDs.

Beyond the Isle of Spice, St. George’s University has graduated more than 14,000 physicians and over 1,200 veterinarians, helping to address doctor shortages in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Dr. G. Richard Olds, who hopes to continue that proud tradition as the University’s inaugural President, welcomed family, friends, and colleagues to a special investiture ceremony at Patrick F. Adams Hall during kickoff weekend. Attendees included Grenada’s Governor General, Dame Cecile La Grenade, Prime Minister Dr. the Right Honorable Keith Mitchell, Baroness Howells of St. David’s, founding members of SGU, parliamentarians, and diplomats. They included Dr. Timothy White, Chancellor, California State University, who delivered the evening’s keynote address, expressing that, in Dr. Olds, SGU had chosen the right person to lead it into the future.

With more than 70 percent of SGU doctors having gone on to practice primary care, many in areas of need, during his address, Dr. Olds reinforced his and the University’s commitment to addressing the primary care shortage and maldistribution of doctors in the US and worldwide.

“I feel privileged to lead St. George’s University at a time when we are doing more than ever to address the shortage of doctors worldwide,” Dr. Olds said. “Our graduates are fulfilling SGU’s mission to shape the future of our world – especially in communities worldwide that most need quality health care.”

SGU also welcomed back members of its charter class who started class at St. George’s University School of Medicine on January 17, 1977. They joined longtime administrators, faculty, and staff, including retired bus driver, Whitley Courtney, the University’s first-ever employee, at a special Founders Dinner in L’Anse aux Epines hosted by Chancellor Charles R. Modica, one of four of SGU’s founders. Other events included a Charity 5K Fun Run, for which more than 100 runners raced from Founders Library to the Grand Anse campus, tours of the True Blue campus, and a library archive exhibition.

Kickoff weekend festivities were punctuated by a Parade of Nations, for which more than 1,000 students, faculty, and staff celebrated SGU’s cultural diversity. In its 40 years, the University has welcomed individuals from more than 140 countries, and to celebrate, parade participants wore their national colors and waved flags of their native countries on their way through lower campus.

 

Kickoff weekend was only the beginning to a yearlong celebration of SGU’s 40 years. For more information and to register, visit www.sgu.edu/beyond40.

St. George’s University Formally Invests Dr. G. Richard Olds as President

Yesterday, St. George’s University formally marked Dr. G. Richard Olds’s appointment as President in an investiture ceremony, a highlight of the university’s 40th anniversary celebration.

“I feel privileged to lead St. George’s at a time when we are doing more than ever to address the shortage of doctors worldwide,” Olds said. “Our graduates are fulfilling St. George’s mission to shape the future of our world — especially in communities worldwide that most need quality health care.”

Co-founder Patrick F. Adams, Baroness Howells of St. Davids, Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell, Founding Chancellor Dr. Charles R. Modica, President & CEO Dr. G. Richard Olds, and California State University Chancellor Dr. Timothy White.

Investiture is a centuries-old academic tradition wherein a new university president receives the symbols of the office. Dr. Olds was appointed President of St. George’s in August 2015.

The Chancellor of the California State University system, Dr. Timothy White, also spoke during the investiture ceremony. He applauded St. George’s for expanding access to medical education among historically underrepresented minorities and recruiting a geographically, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse student body.

Dr. White was previously chancellor of the University of California, Riverside, where he worked with Dr. Olds to establish the university’s School of Medicine, the first LCME-accredited medical school in California in more than four decades. As its founding dean, Dr. Olds focused on addressing the shortage of primary care physicians in the school’s backyard, California’s Inland Empire, where there are only 120 physicians per 100,000 people. That’s 38 percent fewer than the state average.

Dr. Olds has carried that same passion for serving the needy to St. George’s, which is already the largest provider of new doctors to the U.S. healthcare system. Under Dr. Olds’s leadership, St. George’s has expanded several scholarship initiatives that encourage students to work in underserved areas, including the CityDoctors program and the Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program.

“Over our next 40 years and beyond, St. George’s will continue to expand opportunity to more students from geographically, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds — because they are the ones who will make a difference,” said Dr. Olds. “Whether they’re filling the global need for high-quality providers of primary care or solving public health crises, I am excited to see the impact that our students will have on the world.”

Published on 1/16/17

SGU Mourns Passing of Dr. Leon Smith, A Pioneer and Ambassador

St. George’s University mourns the loss of Dr. Leon Smith, the former Chief of Medicine at St. Michael’s Medical Center who first welcomed SGU students to conduct clinical training in New Jersey. Dr. Smith, a renowned infectious disease specialist and longtime ambassador for SGU, passed away on December 19, 2016. He was 87 years old.

“We are eternally grateful for the role – and the chance – that Dr. Smith took in welcoming SGU students during the University’s early years,” said Dr. Stephen Weitzman, Dean, St. George’s University School of Medicine. “He and St. Michael’s not only provided superior clinical training for our students, but its willingness to open its doors to us led to many more opportunities elsewhere.”

“Dr. Smith was the cornerstone for our clinical programs in New Jersey and in the United States,” added Dr. Daniel Ricciardi, MD SGU ’81, Dean of Clinical Studies in the United States. “He was a tremendous ambassador for the school and our students.”

As Chief of Medicine at SMMC, Dr. Smith appointed Joseph Pellicano as the Director of Medical Education and together they welcomed St. George’s University clinical students for the first time in 1979. It was the first comprehensive five-core rotation in the Garden State. Since then, more than 1,300 students have rotated through St. Michael’s, and SGU students can currently train at more than 70 hospitals and clinical centers throughout the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and Grenada.

“Dr. Smith was this towering, magnanimous man with an amazing, embracing smile,” said Dr. Orazio Giliberti, MD SGU ’82, Associate Dean of Clinical Studies in the United States. Dr. Giliberti completed his rotations and intern year at SMMC in the early 1980s. “Dr. Smith would take you in and say ‘let me teach you,’” he recalled. “I remember he would hold service rounds every Friday with all the students, residents, and faculty and teach us one case. It was an experience that not too many people would appreciate unless they were there.”

Dr. Smith (right) chats with friend and former New Jersey Governor Brendan Byrne.

In addition to his role as Chief of Medicine, Dr. Smith also served as its Chief of Infectious Diseases during his 48-year tenure at St. Michael’s. Dr. Smith founded and chaired the internal medicine residency program at Seton Hall University School of Graduate Medical Education, and was a professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey (UMDNJ). Dr. Smith also presided over the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases.

Published on 1/5/17

SAS Alum Outlines Coral Reef Restoration Program During Prince Harry Visit to Grenada

An alumnus of St. George’s University School of Arts and Sciences was part of a day-long welcoming party for Prince Henry of Wales – Prince Harry – during his visit to Grenada on November 28.

For a glass-bottomed boat tour in Grand Anse Bay, His Royal Highness was accompanied by Kerricia Hobson, BSc SGU ’08, Project Manager in the Environment Division in Grenada’s Ministry of Education, Human Resource Development, and the Environment. One of few individuals aboard the charter boat, Ms. Hobson explained the Grenada Coastal Ecosystem-Based Adaptation (EBA) Project, which is designed to reinforce deteriorating reef structures in Grenada and Carriacou through the creation and maintenance of coral nurseries.

She and Prince Harry observed five of the program’s divers, or “gardeners,” assess and clean the nurseries, tasks that will have many long-term environmental and sociological benefits to Grenada.

“Prince Harry was impressed and pledged to be a voice to help raise awareness about the importance of coral reefs,” Ms. Hobson said. “Coral reefs produce the sand on our beautiful beaches, and they’re also important for our tourism and fisheries industries. To restore them, coastal ecosystems have proven to be less costly to implement and a better fit than hard infrastructures such as seawalls.”

The EBA program is run jointly with the Government of Grenada and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), and is the first such project in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS). Since the program’s launch last year, EBA Project personnel, including another SGU grad, Leyana Romain, BSc SGU ’14, have constructed and overseen two nurseries off the coasts of Grenada and Carriacou. As a result of their efforts, nearly 2,000 reef fragments have matured and been installed on existing structures. Ms. Hobson and Ms. Romain are seeking additional funding that will allow them to reach their goal of planting upward of 10,000 fragments in the next 3-5 years.

Following his visit, His Royal Highness left a note that read, “Globally, 75% of coral reefs are under threat from overfishing, habitat destruction, pollution and acidification of the sea due to climate change. It is fantastic to see Grenada doing their bit for their surrounding ocean and coral reefs. We must protect the things that give us so much.”

Ms. Hobson described her conversation with Prince Harry as surreal. “He asked a number of questions and showed that he’s knowledgeable about our work and the issue of coastal preservation,” Ms. Hobson said. “For a while, I forgot that I was talking to His Royal Highness. He didn’t act like he was royalty; he acted like a person who was genuinely interested in the work we were doing.”

Jason Roberts, awarded an honorary doctorate from SGU in May 2016, meets with Prince Harry at Queens Park, Grenada.

Jason Roberts, awarded an honorary doctorate from SGU in May 2016, meets with Prince Harry at Queens Park, Grenada.

Prince Harry represented Queen Elizabeth II in his visit to Grenada, which included a royal welcome at Maurice Bishop International Airport, as well as sporting events at Queens Park Grounds. Prince Harry visited with members of the Jason Roberts Foundation, who launched the Youth in Action initiative to help improve the wellbeing and lifestyle of Grenada youth. Mr. Roberts, a former Premier League and Grenada National Team football player, was honored with an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters by SGU’s School of Graduate Studies in May 2016 for his longtime work on behalf of disabled children in Grenada through the Foundation.

Prince Harry’s visit was part of a 15-day tour of the Caribbean that also included stops in Antigua, Barbados, Barbuda, Guyana, Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Kitts and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Published 12/6/2016