Brooklyn Hospital Foundation to Honor St. George’s University Founders Charles Modica and Patrick Adams

On September 27, the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation will honor St. George’s University founders Charles Modica and Patrick Adams for their substantial contributions to the hospital and the broader medical education community at its 29th annual Founders Ball.

“As a native New Yorker, I feel particularly fortunate to be honored by the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation,” Modica said. “St. George’s University and The Brooklyn Hospital Center have been friends and partners for years, and we’re grateful for the high-quality residency training that the hospital has provided to hundreds of our graduates.”

From left to right, St. George’s University founders Edward McGowan, Louis Modica, Patrick Adams and Charles Modica.

Modica serves as Chairman of St. George’s Board of Trustees and Chancellor; Adams is a Trustee and officer. Over the past 40 years, St. George’s has developed into an international education center, graduating over 15,000 physicians who have gone on to practice in all 50 states and over 50 countries.

St. George’s University is the fourth-largest source of licensed physicians to the United States, and the number-one provider of doctors into U.S. first-year residencies. In 2017, more than 900 of its graduates took residencies in the United States, three-quarters of them in primary care. The Brooklyn Hospital Center will host 32 St. George’s University graduates for first-year residencies this year.

“Charles and Patrick have helped open up opportunities for our graduates in hospitals worldwide,” said St. George’s University Chief Executive Officer Andrew Sussman, MD. “That is exemplified by St. George’s relationship with The Brooklyn Hospital Center. Many SGU students have gained valuable experience at TBHC by training alongside top-notch doctors and nurses, and caring for local patients.”

Modica and Adams are two of the four honorees at this year’s Founders Ball, which will feature football legend Joe Namath as a special guest.

“Our mission in founding St. George’s was to change the status quo in medical education, and we’ve been doing that for 40 years,” Adams said. “Our graduates have made a difference in countless communities around the world—including Brooklyn. I share the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation’s recognition with them and with the entire St. George’s community.”

Chancellor Charles Modica and Patrick Adams cut the ribbon to officially open SGU’s largest auditorium, Patrick F. Adams Hall, in March 2011.

St. George’s University Partners with Larkin University for Combined Degree Program

St. George’s University has partnered with Larkin University in Miami to create a program that will grant qualified Larkin students admission to SGU’s School of Medicine upon completion of a master’s program in biomedical sciences.

“Our new program will attract students with unique educational backgrounds who are passionate about medicine—and who will thrive at St. George’s,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “Doctors who have already earned a master’s in biomedical sciences will be well-positioned to become trailblazers in the scientific community.”

Founded in 2013 as Larkin Health Sciences Institute, Larkin is a graduate school that specializes in biomedical sciences and pharmacology. With this new agreement, students who express interest in the combined degree program are admitted to the St. George’s University’s Doctor of Medicine program with the requisite GPA and MCAT scores, a letter of recommendation, and an interview. Admitted students will enter the first year of the MD program immediately after completing their master’s degree.

This new partnership bolsters a network of collaborations between SGU and universities and hospitals throughout Florida. Since 2010, nearly 200 SGU students have matched for residencies in Florida. In 2017, 36 students began residencies in hospitals throughout the state.

“We look forward to welcoming these students,” said Dr. Olds. “We’re confident that they will bring new perspective to our classrooms and become dedicated physicians when they graduate.”

St. George’s University to Host Major International One Health One Medicine Symposium

Uniquely positioned to lead a discussion on collaborative, global health topics, St. George’s University is hosting a two-day One Health One Medicine Symposium on October 21 and 22. In addition to being a hub for international education across medicine, veterinary medicine, and public health, the University also holds the distinction of being a World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Environmental and Occupational Health. The speakers at the conference are pioneers and leaders in this field.

“One Health One Medicine is the convergence of human, animal, and ecosystem health, resulting in a joined-up approach between complementary sectors that, all too often, are practiced in a vacuum,” said Dr. Calum Macpherson, Vice Provost for International Program Development at SGU. “Each of these practices are inextricably connected, and by learning from each other and pooling resources, great progress can be made for the benefit of human and animal kind.”

St. George’s University’s OHOM initiative is aimed to help facilitate the further development of opportunities locally and, in collaboration with international institutions, to address global health challenges affecting the health of people, animals, and the environment. The initiative has evolved for 10 years, most recently to include a series of SGU-sponsored OHOM conferences, open access courses, and workshops, culminating in the upcoming symposium.

Students and faculty from the School of Medicine and School of Veterinary Medicine host free wellness check-ups at a One Health One Medicine clinic in Grand Anse, Grenada.

Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU, is also a professor in the Schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine as well as a tropical disease specialist who has worked on one health issues around the world. He views Grenada as the ideal location to examine issues related to the One Health One Medicine philosophy.

“It is fitting that SGU, an international center of excellence for medical training, is hosting a major conference on the importance of a global approach to human, animal, and ecosystem health,” said Dr. Olds. “Our student body, both past and present, come from all corners of the globe, and by creating a space for these experiences and ideas to come together, we will continue to drive progress in all areas of medicine.”

Distinguished international experts speaking at the event include:

  • Guy Palmer, DVM, PhD – Regents Professor of Pathology and Infectious Diseases, The Jan and Jack Creighton Endowed Chair & Senior Director of Global Health, Director of the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, USA
  • Fitzroy Henry, PhD – College of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Jamaica, West Indies
  • Sarah Cleaveland, BVSC, PhD, FRS – Professor of Comparative Epidemiology, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary, and Life Sciences, Glasgow University, Scotland, UK
  • Chulathida Chomchai, MD – Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Mahidol University International College, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Summon Chomchai – Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

A call for abstracts, to be considered by the symposium’s Scientific Advisory Committee, for oral and poster contributions to this symposium are now invited. More information and the template for the abstracts and poster presentations can be attained from Ms. Naomi Alexander.

To register for the symposium or to submit a research abstract for discussion, visit the One Health One Medicine webpage.

St. George’s University Welcomes Charles Furey as Consultant in Canada

Charles Furey

Before embarking on a long career in government, Charles Furey served as a high school English and history teacher in his native Newfoundland. Thirty years later, he will help guide Canadian students toward their career goals once more, this time with St. George’s University.

In August, SGU welcomed Mr. Furey as a consultant to Canada. He adds to an experienced staff that also includes Sandra Banner, the former Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Resident Matching Service, who joined St. George’s University in April.

“Any new challenge is always exciting, and I’m really happy about working with Sandra, who has done an outstanding job,” he said.

At SGU, Mr. Furey will concentrate on three areas in his new position: recruitment, hospital electives, and government relations. He comes from a political family—his older brother, George, is the Speaker of the Senate in Canada. Charles Furey spent 15 years in government himself, winning five consecutive elections in Newfoundland and Labrador’s House of Assembly. He held such positions as Chief Electoral Officer; Minister of Tourism, Culture, and Recreation; Minister of Mines and Energy; and Minister of Industry, Trade, and Technology.

For 10 years, Mr. Furey was an independent consultant on advisory services, government relations, and strategy planning for a wide array of clients.

“SGU has such a great history, and I want to get into the hallways of power and explain what we’re doing to satisfy the demand for physicians, particularly in rural areas,” Mr. Furey said. “There’s a high demand that Canada can’t fill right now, and we have a great pool of students who can help.”

Mr. Furey’s career has returned to the education realm, which is where it began. He earned his Bachelor of Arts and Education from St. Francis Xavier University and taught in Conche and Stephenville Crossing before turning his sights to politics. Recently, he learned about the medical landscape when his wife, Vanessa, now a neurologist at the University of Ottawa, pursued and obtained a Doctor of Medicine.

Mr. Furey also hopes to set up elective opportunities that will enhance the chances for Canadian students to receive clinical training in their home country. More than 180 SGU graduates are currently practicing in Canada, and Mr. Furey had the pleasure of meeting four of them at a recent information session in Toronto.

“I was absolutely floored by the quality of these graduates,” he remarked. “They were well-spoken, sharp on their feet, and transparent, and had all obtained fantastic residencies. They really lit up the room.”

Mr. Furey said he welcomes the opportunity to meet with more alumni, clinical students, and prospective students at upcoming SGU events, including in Vancouver, Halifax, Toronto, and Ottawa this fall.

“I look forward to opening the toolbox and seeing what we can do for students,” Mr. Furey said. “We’re providing exceptional teaching, and I want to tell the story about the many great Canadians who chose a different path.”

Faculty Members Present at International Medical Illustration Conference

Two faculty members in St. George’s University’s Department of Anatomical Sciences, Wes Price and Xochitl Vinaja, delivered a full-day digital sculpting course to professional scientific artists at the 72nd Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI) Conference held in Austin, TX, on July 23.

The workshop covered the basics of sculpting anatomical models in virtual digital clay using the software ZBrush. Once these models are created on the computer, an illustrator can use them to teach complex scientific concepts in a variety of ways, from turning them into book illustrations to creating a 3D print.

More than 20 medical and scientific artists from all over North America were in attendance, including illustrators for the Mayo Clinic, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Smithsonian Institution, and Scientific American.

In addition, Dr. Marios Loukas, the Dean of Basic Sciences and Professor in the Department of Anatomical Sciences, presented a plenary session titled “Common Anatomical Mistakes in Cardiac Anatomy” to the AMI, emphasizing the need for illustrators to draw directly from the source—the human body—in order to avoid mistakes and misconceptions.

SGU faculty members Xochitl Vinaja, Quade Paul and Wes Price organized a day-long digital sculpting course.

Department of Anatomical Sciences faculty attending the meeting included Jessica Holland, Marios Loukas, Xochitl Vinaja, and Katie Yost.

University of Munich Recognizes SGU Professor for Lung Function Research

One of the most prestigious universities in Europe, the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) annually offers the Prize of the Munich University Society for outstanding scientific work by students. Among the winners of the six coveted spots for exceptional doctoral works was St. George’s University professor Dr. Maia Smith, whose research titled, “Associations Between Physical Activity and Lung Function in a Cohort of German Adolescents” garnered her both a certificate of recognition and the corresponding prize money of Euro 3,000.

“I’m beyond pleased and somewhat surprised at this honor,” said Dr. Smith, an Assistant Professor at SGU’s Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. “Among such impressive candidates from such diverse backgrounds, I feel extremely proud to have my work recognized.”

Touted as the largest cross-faculty support organization in Germany, the Society of friends and sponsors of LMU offers an annual incentive for young academics to intensify their scientific work. Up to six doctoral works and three habilitations are awarded, with the goal of directing the attention of a broader scientific public towards the particular achievement of the scientist.

Dr. Smith joined SGU this April to teach epidemiology and biostatistics. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in human ecology from the College of the Atlantic, a Master of Science from Drexel University in biostatistics, and a research doctorate in human biology from LMU. During her studies at LMU, she served as a graduate research assistant for Helmholtz Center in Munich, which develops personalized medical approaches for the prevention and therapy of major common diseases such as diabetes, lung disease, and allergy.

“I believe a combination of research support and relevant teaching is what will make a difference to young MD students, and it’s what brought me to SGU,” said Dr. Smith. “Science has always seemed like a universal language, and it’s very gratifying to see that others feel that way too.”

Veterinary Student Acknowledged for Excellence in Small Animal Neurology

Dr. William Thomas, Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Tennessee (left) with Amelia Roos, 4th year School of Veterinary Medicine Student, St. George’s University

The University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine’s Rodney Award is given annually to one outstanding clinical student in small animal neurology. This year, the distinction went to St. George’s University fourth-year veterinary student Amelia Roos, whom the faculty recognized for her competency and passion exhibited during her clinical rotation in Knoxville.

“This particular award is an absolute honor to receive,” said Ms. Roos. “Yet, the greatest gift was being recognized for my capabilities by the Neurology Service that I admire so much. And I hope to continue to honor this recognition.”

The Rodney Award is named after a border collie belonging to Karen McLucas, a patient of the Neurology Service. In addition to receiving this year’s accolades, Ms. Roos also received a copy of Alexander de Lahunta’s Veterinary Neuroanatomy and Clinical Neurology 4th edition textbook and a Welch Allyn penlight.

Originally from a small town in Southern California, Ms. Roos has come a long way from those days in elementary school when she brought home and cared for injured birds and stray dogs. Currently completing her clinical year at U of T, Ms. Roos views this year’s Rodney Award as bringing her a step closer in fulfilling her dream of becoming a veterinarian.

“Since experiencing neurology in the clinical setting, I have actually been inspired to further my career in this field, which is a huge decision for me,” shared Ms. Roos. “In the future, I hope to pursue an academic small animal rotating internship and, if I’m fortunate enough, a residency in neurology. Once I’ve established myself as a veterinarian, I also hope to organize free exam/vaccine clinics for low-income communities in the interest of public health and education, a personal passion of mine.”

Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy Draws Rave Reviews

For the past year and a half, 17-year-old Marco Turner mulled the idea of becoming a veterinarian. Originally from the Bahamas, he had volunteered in a veterinarian’s office, where he helped nurse the community’s pets back to health, and then began researching opportunities that would help further his career in veterinary medicine.

Enter the St. George’s University Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy, which has welcomed nearly 900 aspiring physicians and veterinarians to Grenada to receive an insider’s view of their future careers since 2002. In the program’s 15-year history, 46 Academy graduates have gone on to enroll in the School of Medicine or Veterinary Medicine.

“This experience so far has been great,” said Mr. Turner. “Today, we had a suture clinic where we learned how to do three different kinds of suture patterns. While working at a vet’s office, I would see these sutures done, and I always wished that I could do it myself. Now I have the chance.

“This has been a valuable opportunity for my own learning and development that I would definitely recommend to anyone interested in a med or vet program.”

This summer, 74 students hailing from the United States, Canada, Trinidad, Bahamas, Bermuda, United Kingdom, and Puerto Rico successfully balanced a challenging academic program with extracurricular activities such as hiking, sailing, and snorkeling. Both the med and vet students engaged in courses that combined didactic lectures, small-group problem solving sessions, practical lab work in state-of-the-art facilities, and hands-on training through simulated and real-life situations.

This year’s class included Charlize Espinoza, who had undoubtedly been regaled with stories of SGU by her aunt, Cholene Espinoza, MD SGU ’15, now a PGY-3 OB/GYN resident at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. When asked in kindergarten what she wanted to be when she grew up, Charlize replied “a doctor.” A decade later, that answer still hasn’t changed.

“I jumped at the chance to attend the Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy because I really wanted the opportunity to plan out my future and get a glimpse of what attending medical school would be like,” Ms. Espinoza said. “However, as someone who suffers from anxiety attacks, I thought this might not be right for me—being in a different country, living in dorms, and being away from my parents. But since being here, I haven’t had any anxiety issues. Instead, I’m really enjoying this experience, and everyone has been so warm and welcoming. It’s been a very intensive program so far but the lectures are very interesting and the doctors are very accessible. The Academy is a great place to test the waters and get ready for medical school.”

In 2017, four Academy alumni—Kristen Sellar, DVM; Abigail Maynard, DVM; Lisa Dyke, MD; and Virginia Vazzana, MD—earned their degrees at commencement in New York City. Dr. Vazzana, daughter of SGU alumnus Thomas Vazzana, MD SGU ’85, attended the Med-Vet Summer Leadership Academy in 2010 after it received rave reviews from her older sister, who had attended three years earlier. She accepted a seat at SGU’s School of Medicine, where she met and married her classmate Hamfreth Shaul Rahming, MD SGU ’17. Dr. Vazzana began her pediatric residency at The Dwaine and Cynthia Willet Children’s Hospital of Memorial Health University Medical Center in Savannah, Georgia, this month.

“The Academy was truly the first experience that I had of what medical school and becoming a physician is really like,” stated Dr. Vazzana. “I still remember the first time I worked on a human cadaver, the first time I wore a white coat and shadowed doctors to see real patients, the first time I learned to use an ultrasound machine, and so much more. These things all happened at the Academy. For me, being exposed to these opportunities really was a perfect way to confirm what I wanted to do with my future and is a huge reason I became a doctor.”

St. George’s University Remembers Lloyd Noel

St. George’s University mourns the loss of Lloyd Noel, former Attorney General of Grenada (1979-1980), who passed away on Monday, July 3, 2017 in New York. An early advocate for the University, Mr. Noel served as Lead Grenadian Council of St. George’s University, playing an integral role in its government and labor relations.

A gifted lawyer, Mr. Noel joined SGU in 1984, diligently representing the University and working to protect its rights while striking an effective balance between the needs of the people of Grenada and the University. In 1986 he was appointed as an Assistant Professor in the department of Medical Jurisprudence at St. George’s University School of Medicine in September. Mr. Noel served on a number of committees which furthered the University’s presence in Grenada, including the Fund for Orphans and Elderly and the SGU Monitoring Committee.

As a fervent advocate for free speech, Mr. Noel also authored an editorial column in the local newspaper that provided critical analysis of the Government of Grenada, as well as addressing many social issues in the country and various parts of the world. Mr. Noel was a devout Roman Catholic who was active in his parish of St. John and the wider community. A devoted husband and father, he was compassionate, fair-minded and affable and could always be counted on.

“As General Counsel of SGU, I interviewed Lloyd and made the decision to hire him for the position of Lead Grenadian Council of St. George’s University”, said Patrick F. Adams, Esq., co-founder, Trustee, and former General Counsel. “With his no-nonsense style, Lloyd was a person whose “yes” meant “yes” and his “no” meant “no.”” “As a family man, he was a dedicated father and a husband who deeply loved his wife. Lloyd was a talented lawyer but more importantly, he was a great man. His invaluable impact on the growth and success of SGU will not be forgotten. I will greatly miss him as a colleague and friend.”

Mr. Noel is survived by his wife and children, including Mr. Larry Noel, Athletics Coordinator of Field and Facilities, Athletics and Activities Department, SGU. His outstanding contribution to St. George’s University is immeasurably appreciated and he will be greatly missed by his family, friends, and colleagues.

Banner: Addressing Canada’s Rural Doctor Shortage

Sandra Banner

An opinion piece by Sandra Banner, former director of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) and currently a consultant at St. George’s University, appeared in the Vancouver Sun on Sunday, June 25.

In it, Ms. Banner explained how medical schools such as SGU address the rural doctor shortage in Canada, citing a Canadian Institute of Health Information report that states that fewer than half of residents can secure same-day or next-day appointments with their family doctors.

“Canada’s leaders must act to reverse these shortages,” Ms. Banner wrote. “Doing so will require an aggressive effort by medical schools and governments to encourage more young people to consider careers in family medicine—careers that have an outsized impact on the health of Canadians.”

St. George’s University has graduated more than 1,300 Canadian doctors, more than 70 percent of which have entered a career in primary care. Read the entire opinion piece by visiting the Vancouver Sun website.