St. George’s University’s Primary Medical Qualification Receives GMC Approval

All graduate doctors from St. George’s University are from this month automatically eligible to apply for General Medical Council (GMC) registration, following the regulatory body’s decision to remove the medical school from their case-by-case list.

The move recognizes the quality of SGU’s graduates and teaching standards, and paves the way for SGU graduates to study and work in the UK following successful registration and completion of prerequisite exams.

Following a review of the university’s primary medical qualifications, the Council agreed that graduates from St. George’s University are now able to apply to sit the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB) test and GMC registration in the UK, without having their qualification individually assessed. Applicants had previously been approved on a case-by-case basis.

The PLAB test is the main route by which international medical graduates demonstrate that they have the necessary skills and knowledge to practice medicine in the UK.

Rodney Croft, Dean of Clinical Studies UK, explained the significance of the move. “That the GMC will now recognize the SGU MD degree without an individual examination of each qualification is a major step forward and will encourage more SGU graduates to come to practice in the UK. This is one of a number of recent positive changes to come from the GMC, including the revocation of the ‘50% rule.’ ”

For many years, SGU’s medical graduates were assessed on a case-by-case basis with the Case Registration Advisor at the GMC having a wide latitude for determining the parameters of the “50% rule.” Some were in jeopardy of being registered with the GMC if they joined an international selective, thereby having two more weeks on their  transcript “away from the country awarding the diploma” and therefore putting them on the wrong side of the “50% rule.”

The students in SGU’s Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program were particularly adversely affected by this rule since they spend the first year of their basic science program in the UK. As SGU’s clinical program takes place mainly in the US and the UK, students at the KBTGSP would not be able to be registered with the GMC, unless they returned to Grenada to do their final-year elective program. Now such students can benefit from doing their fourth-year attachments in the US and/or the UK.

“Another problem for our students has been the timing of the PLAB exams, which have meant our graduates have had to wait up to 18 months following graduation without a salary before beginning their first foundation year in UK hospitals,” Mr. Croft added. “In the near future, PLAB is being replaced with the Medical Licensing Assessment, which will be held more frequently throughout the year.

“It is hoped that, when taken together, these measures will help address the serious shortage of doctors in the UK, particularly in general practice, psychiatry, and emergency medicine.”

Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University, said, “Our students receive a world-class medical education and are able to take advantage of facilities in the UK, Grenada, Canada, and the USA as part of their formal training. As a result, our graduates benefit from a truly globalized training program, making them ideal candidates to work in healthcare systems with a diversity of patients, like the NHS.

“I am pleased that this has been recognized by the General Medical Council in the UK, and look forward to more doctors from SGU taking advantage of the rewarding career opportunities offered in the UK.”

St. George’s University Introduces Pay It Forward Program for Canadian Students

This week, St. George’s University launched the Pay It Forward program, which will allow Canadian students who enroll in SGU’s January MD entering classes, starting in January of 2018, to claim a refund of their tuition if they are accepted to and matriculate at a Canadian or US allopathic medical school for the subsequent fall term.

“Applying to medical school is stressful. Many students may not want to wait until the spring for an offer of admission from a Canadian medical school that may never come,” said Sandra Banner, SGU’s consultant for university relations in Canada. “Pay It Forward will allow Canadian students to jumpstart their medical educations without sacrificing the possibility of returning to Canada for medical school.”

“We’re confident that after one semester at St. George’s, they’ll decide to stay,” Banner added. “However, the beauty of this program is that if they want to go to the Canadian—or US—medical school, they have a term of top-quality integrated systems-based medical education under their belt. They will shine in their new medical school!”

Starting this January application cycle, anyone who enrolls for the Spring 2018 semester at SGU and is subsequently admitted to—and enrolled at—a Canadian or US allopathic medical school for the Fall 2018 term will receive a full refund of SGU’s tuition and fees, if they choose to accept their spot in Canada or the US.

This program is the latest in a series of efforts by St. George’s to bolster its offerings to Canadian students. This year, St. George’s hired Banner, the former CEO of the Canadian Resident Matching Service, and Charles Furey, a former elected official with years of experience in the Canadian government, to help strengthen the University’s network in Canada.

Banner and Furey will work to increase the number of clinical rotation spots available to St. George’s students and establish electives at new hospitals all over the country.

“Our Pay It Forward program demonstrates that we have the utmost confidence in the education and experience we provide at St. George’s,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “We have a long and storied tradition of educating Canada’s doctors of the future, and we believe that this program will help us attract even more of Canada’s best and brightest.”

St. George’s University Awards Scholarships to 122 Incoming Students

Legacy of Excellence and Chancellor’s Circle Legacy of Excellence scholarship recipients gather for a group photo on the upper True Blue Campus.

St. George’s University has awarded more than $800,000 in scholarships to 122 members of the School of Medicine’s incoming class of 2021.

“Here at St. George’s, we aim to help talented students from around the world achieve their goal of becoming doctors, irrespective of their social or economic backgrounds” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “Our scholarship recipients are enormously accomplished and we are excited to welcome them to school this fall.”

Seventy-nine incoming students received Legacy of Excellence Scholarships in recognition of their strong MCAT scores and records of academic excellence. St. George’s has offered these $60,000 scholarships for more than a decade.

Forty-three students received the Chancellor’s Circle of Legacy of Excellence scholarship, an $80,100 award for those with undergraduate GPAs of 3.7 or higher, science GPAs of 3.5 or higher, and MCAT scores of 506 or higher. St. George’s has offered these scholarships for the past eight years.

“We believe financial need shouldn’t stop aspiring physicians from serving their communities,” said Dr. Olds. “We hope that these scholarship recipients will graduate from St. George’s determined to bring their newfound medical expertise to areas most in need.”

This year’s recipients join more than 5,000 students who have received academic scholarships from the University. In total, SGU has granted more than $100 million in scholarships.

St. George’s University to Host Council for Education in the Commonwealth Annual Conference in 2019

Long a hub for international education, St. George’s University has been selected to host the Council for Education in the Commonwealth (CEC) Annual Conference in 2019. Hundreds of educators, policy makers, and education experts from around the world will gather in True Blue to discuss current issues and developments in the field of education and to identify ways to foster educational cooperation.

Glen Jacobs, Professor and Vice Provost for Educational Services at SGU, presented to more than 200 delegates at last month’s CEC conference in Windhoek, Namibia, and also delivered a keynote address.

The conference—titled “Leading the Elephant Out of the Bush: Education and Business Together Bridging the Gap”—focused on a variety of topics including ways to create business alliances that promote innovation, enterprise, and 21st century workplace skills; the ever-increasing role of digital learning and teaching; and strengthening the bridge between schools, tertiary education, and industry.

When the CEC comes to True Blue, Grenada will become the first Caribbean site to host the CEC conference in the organization’s 50-year history.

“We are delighted to be hosting the CEC’s annual conference in 2019,” Dr. Jacobs said. “Our university is at the center of international medical education, and it is fitting that we can provide a platform for an organization that conducts such vital work in promoting education across the Commonwealth. The theme ‘Student Success’ is directly relevant to our mission, and we are excited to provide engagement and collaboration on this topic with key constituents in the region and across the Commonwealth.”

Dr. Jacobs served as a keynote speaker on day two of the Namibia conference, presenting on the topic “Building Capacity Through Tertiary Education: The Role of Quality and Relevance in Best Practice.” He joined SGU’s Department of Educational Services (DES) in 1997, and it now welcomes close to 100 percent of the University’s students to participate in its innovative programs that assist with enhancing skills in time management, note-taking, the utilization of technology effectively in teaching and learning, as well as reading efficiency, writing, and oral communication. In addition, the Department’s faculty development program introduces new and evolving methods of instruction to faculty across all schools.

“If we accept students to an institution, it is our moral obligation to give them the academic support they need to be successful,” Dr. Jacobs said. “By implementing best practices in academic student support, it also helps institutions be sustainable.”

DES’s efforts have garnered three awards from the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA). Most recently, its Academic Enhancement Program (AEP) received NACADA’s Outstanding Institutional Advising Program Certificate of Merit Award in 2015.

Located Below the Hurricane Belt, St. George’s University Aids Its Northern Neighbors in Need

St. George’s University students, faculty, and staff are collaborating to lend a hand to citizens of Caribbean islands impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Grenada is, thankfully, south of the usual hurricane path and can assist its northern neighbors. The recent wave of storms has personally affected the friends and families of many students and staff members from the Caribbean.

“The people and the infrastructure in these countries have been dramatically affected by these storms, and it’s important that we band together to do what we can to assist in the relief efforts,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University.

On Wednesday and Thursday, SGU rallied together to make significant contributions to those in need, donating everything from non-perishable food and gently used clothing to toiletries and water to drop-off locations at Charter Hall and Bourne Hall. Representatives from the University’s Student Government Association will take inventory of donated items in preparation of delivery next week through Grenada’s National Disaster Management Agency (NaDMA), which is working with the Red Cross and other organizations to coordinate relief efforts in the region.

In addition, individuals have made monetary contributions to NaDMA through the Grenada Cooperative Bank. The Dean of Students office and Psychological Services Center have also been open to all those in need of assistance.

“In their time of need, we need to be an institution and a community that they can lean on,” Dr. Olds said. “We preach compassion and altruism in everything that we do and in day-to-day life, and this is a prime example of when we need to be here for people who need us.”

Next month, the undergraduate student organization ECO (Education Conservation Outreach) is planning a faculty and student talent and fashion show, with models wearing clothing made entirely of recycle goods and/or local, natural products. All funds generated from the event—set for October 27—will be given to relief organizations providing aid in Antigua, Barbuda, and Dominica.

Tickets will be on sale at the Student Center beginning on October 19. Individuals interested in participating in the event can email ECO President Michelle Taylor at

Brooklyn Hospital Foundation to Honor St. George’s University Founders Charles Modica and Patrick Adams

On September 27, the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation will honor St. George’s University founders Charles Modica and Patrick Adams for their substantial contributions to the hospital and the broader medical education community at its 29th annual Founders Ball.

“As a native New Yorker, I feel particularly fortunate to be honored by the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation,” Modica said. “St. George’s University and The Brooklyn Hospital Center have been friends and partners for years, and we’re grateful for the high-quality residency training that the hospital has provided to hundreds of our graduates.”

From left to right, St. George’s University founders Edward McGowan, Louis Modica, Patrick Adams and Charles Modica.

Modica serves as Chairman of St. George’s Board of Trustees and Chancellor; Adams is a Trustee and officer. Over the past 40 years, St. George’s has developed into an international education center, graduating over 15,000 physicians who have gone on to practice in all 50 states and over 50 countries.

St. George’s University is the fourth-largest source of licensed physicians to the United States, and the number-one provider of doctors into U.S. first-year residencies. In 2017, more than 900 of its graduates took residencies in the United States, three-quarters of them in primary care. The Brooklyn Hospital Center will host 32 St. George’s University graduates for first-year residencies this year.

“Charles and Patrick have helped open up opportunities for our graduates in hospitals worldwide,” said St. George’s University Chief Executive Officer Andrew Sussman, MD. “That is exemplified by St. George’s relationship with The Brooklyn Hospital Center. Many SGU students have gained valuable experience at TBHC by training alongside top-notch doctors and nurses, and caring for local patients.”

Modica and Adams are two of the four honorees at this year’s Founders Ball, which will feature football legend Joe Namath as a special guest.

“Our mission in founding St. George’s was to change the status quo in medical education, and we’ve been doing that for 40 years,” Adams said. “Our graduates have made a difference in countless communities around the world—including Brooklyn. I share the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation’s recognition with them and with the entire St. George’s community.”

Chancellor Charles Modica and Patrick Adams cut the ribbon to officially open SGU’s largest auditorium, Patrick F. Adams Hall, in March 2011.

St. George’s University Partners with Larkin University for Combined Degree Program

St. George’s University has partnered with Larkin University in Miami to create a program that will grant qualified Larkin students admission to SGU’s School of Medicine upon completion of a master’s program in biomedical sciences.

“Our new program will attract students with unique educational backgrounds who are passionate about medicine—and who will thrive at St. George’s,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “Doctors who have already earned a master’s in biomedical sciences will be well-positioned to become trailblazers in the scientific community.”

Founded in 2013 as Larkin Health Sciences Institute, Larkin is a graduate school that specializes in biomedical sciences and pharmacology. With this new agreement, students who express interest in the combined degree program are admitted to the St. George’s University’s Doctor of Medicine program with the requisite GPA and MCAT scores, a letter of recommendation, and an interview. Admitted students will enter the first year of the MD program immediately after completing their master’s degree.

This new partnership bolsters a network of collaborations between SGU and universities and hospitals throughout Florida. Since 2010, nearly 200 SGU students have matched for residencies in Florida. In 2017, 36 students began residencies in hospitals throughout the state.

“We look forward to welcoming these students,” said Dr. Olds. “We’re confident that they will bring new perspective to our classrooms and become dedicated physicians when they graduate.”

St. George’s University to Host Major International One Health One Medicine Symposium

Uniquely positioned to lead a discussion on collaborative, global health topics, St. George’s University is hosting a two-day One Health One Medicine Symposium on October 21 and 22. In addition to being a hub for international education across medicine, veterinary medicine, and public health, the University also holds the distinction of being a World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Environmental and Occupational Health. The speakers at the conference are pioneers and leaders in this field.

“One Health One Medicine is the convergence of human, animal, and ecosystem health, resulting in a joined-up approach between complementary sectors that, all too often, are practiced in a vacuum,” said Dr. Calum Macpherson, Vice Provost for International Program Development at SGU. “Each of these practices are inextricably connected, and by learning from each other and pooling resources, great progress can be made for the benefit of human and animal kind.”

St. George’s University’s OHOM initiative is aimed to help facilitate the further development of opportunities locally and, in collaboration with international institutions, to address global health challenges affecting the health of people, animals, and the environment. The initiative has evolved for 10 years, most recently to include a series of SGU-sponsored OHOM conferences, open access courses, and workshops, culminating in the upcoming symposium.

Students and faculty from the School of Medicine and School of Veterinary Medicine host free wellness check-ups at a One Health One Medicine clinic in Grand Anse, Grenada.

Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU, is also a professor in the Schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine as well as a tropical disease specialist who has worked on one health issues around the world. He views Grenada as the ideal location to examine issues related to the One Health One Medicine philosophy.

“It is fitting that SGU, an international center of excellence for medical training, is hosting a major conference on the importance of a global approach to human, animal, and ecosystem health,” said Dr. Olds. “Our student body, both past and present, come from all corners of the globe, and by creating a space for these experiences and ideas to come together, we will continue to drive progress in all areas of medicine.”

Distinguished international experts speaking at the event include:

  • Guy Palmer, DVM, PhD – Regents Professor of Pathology and Infectious Diseases, The Jan and Jack Creighton Endowed Chair & Senior Director of Global Health, Director of the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, USA
  • Fitzroy Henry, PhD – College of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Jamaica, West Indies
  • Sarah Cleaveland, BVSC, PhD, FRS – Professor of Comparative Epidemiology, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary, and Life Sciences, Glasgow University, Scotland, UK
  • Chulathida Chomchai, MD – Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Mahidol University International College, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Summon Chomchai – Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

A call for abstracts, to be considered by the symposium’s Scientific Advisory Committee, for oral and poster contributions to this symposium are now invited. More information and the template for the abstracts and poster presentations can be attained from Ms. Naomi Alexander.

To register for the symposium or to submit a research abstract for discussion, visit the One Health One Medicine webpage.

St. George’s University Welcomes Charles Furey as Consultant in Canada

Charles Furey

Before embarking on a long career in government, Charles Furey served as a high school English and history teacher in his native Newfoundland. Thirty years later, he will help guide Canadian students toward their career goals once more, this time with St. George’s University.

In August, SGU welcomed Mr. Furey as a consultant to Canada. He adds to an experienced staff that also includes Sandra Banner, the former Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Resident Matching Service, who joined St. George’s University in April.

“Any new challenge is always exciting, and I’m really happy about working with Sandra, who has done an outstanding job,” he said.

At SGU, Mr. Furey will concentrate on three areas in his new position: recruitment, hospital electives, and government relations. He comes from a political family—his older brother, George, is the Speaker of the Senate in Canada. Charles Furey spent 15 years in government himself, winning five consecutive elections in Newfoundland and Labrador’s House of Assembly. He held such positions as Chief Electoral Officer; Minister of Tourism, Culture, and Recreation; Minister of Mines and Energy; and Minister of Industry, Trade, and Technology.

For 10 years, Mr. Furey was an independent consultant on advisory services, government relations, and strategy planning for a wide array of clients.

“SGU has such a great history, and I want to get into the hallways of power and explain what we’re doing to satisfy the demand for physicians, particularly in rural areas,” Mr. Furey said. “There’s a high demand that Canada can’t fill right now, and we have a great pool of students who can help.”

Mr. Furey’s career has returned to the education realm, which is where it began. He earned his Bachelor of Arts and Education from St. Francis Xavier University and taught in Conche and Stephenville Crossing before turning his sights to politics. Recently, he learned about the medical landscape when his wife, Vanessa, now a neurologist at the University of Ottawa, pursued and obtained a Doctor of Medicine.

Mr. Furey also hopes to set up elective opportunities that will enhance the chances for Canadian students to receive clinical training in their home country. More than 180 SGU graduates are currently practicing in Canada, and Mr. Furey had the pleasure of meeting four of them at a recent information session in Toronto.

“I was absolutely floored by the quality of these graduates,” he remarked. “They were well-spoken, sharp on their feet, and transparent, and had all obtained fantastic residencies. They really lit up the room.”

Mr. Furey said he welcomes the opportunity to meet with more alumni, clinical students, and prospective students at upcoming SGU events, including in Vancouver, Halifax, Toronto, and Ottawa this fall.

“I look forward to opening the toolbox and seeing what we can do for students,” Mr. Furey said. “We’re providing exceptional teaching, and I want to tell the story about the many great Canadians who chose a different path.”

Faculty Members Present at International Medical Illustration Conference

Two faculty members in St. George’s University’s Department of Anatomical Sciences, Wes Price and Xochitl Vinaja, delivered a full-day digital sculpting course to professional scientific artists at the 72nd Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI) Conference held in Austin, TX, on July 23.

The workshop covered the basics of sculpting anatomical models in virtual digital clay using the software ZBrush. Once these models are created on the computer, an illustrator can use them to teach complex scientific concepts in a variety of ways, from turning them into book illustrations to creating a 3D print.

More than 20 medical and scientific artists from all over North America were in attendance, including illustrators for the Mayo Clinic, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Smithsonian Institution, and Scientific American.

In addition, Dr. Marios Loukas, the Dean of Basic Sciences and Professor in the Department of Anatomical Sciences, presented a plenary session titled “Common Anatomical Mistakes in Cardiac Anatomy” to the AMI, emphasizing the need for illustrators to draw directly from the source—the human body—in order to avoid mistakes and misconceptions.

SGU faculty members Xochitl Vinaja, Quade Paul and Wes Price organized a day-long digital sculpting course.

Department of Anatomical Sciences faculty attending the meeting included Jessica Holland, Marios Loukas, Xochitl Vinaja, and Katie Yost.