St. George’s University Hires Leading Canadian Medical Education Official

File Photo: Ms. Banner, third from left, during an April 2013 visit to SGU’s True Blue Campus.

St. George’s University has hired Sandra Banner, the former director of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS), as its new consultant for University relations in Canada.

“I’m thrilled to join the St. George’s University team,” Ms. Banner said. “I look forward to expanding the St. George’s presence in Canada and strengthening our relationships with the Canadian medical community.”

As a consultant, Ms. Banner’s focus will be on expanding St. George’s University clinical programs in Canada, which currently include partnerships with the University of Saskatchewan and Vancouver General Hospital. She will also assist in recruiting Canadian students and shaping SGU’s message to Canadian audiences.

Ms. Banner comes to SGU after serving for 29 years as Executive Director and CEO of CaRMS, the national organization that matches students with residencies in Canada. During her tenure, CaRMS also grew from 1.5 full-time staffers to more than 40. The Service now serves over 7,000 applicants and 650 programs across Canada.

Ms. Banner brings a wealth of medical and educational experience to St. George’s University. She has served as a Board Director on the Physicians Credential Registry of Canada and is an Honorary Member of the College of Family Physicians in Canada. She has also presented to government committees on the state of medical education, including the Advisory Committee on Health Delivery and Human Resources, established by the Deputy Ministers of Health in Canada. Banner collaborated and contributed to the Future of Medical Education in Canada, a groundbreaking report aiming to reform the medical education system in order to better address the health needs of Canadians.

“St. George’s University is committed to training the physicians Canada needs to address its nationwide doctor shortage,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President, St. George’s University. “Sandra is the perfect person to lead our efforts in pursuit of that mission.”

SGU Graduate’s Work to Appear in New York City’s Museum of Modern Art

Before Joanne Caring, MD SGU ’86, began her career as an award-winning psychiatrist, she was an art student at Cornell University. Almost 40 years since changing career paths, her life will come full circle.

Dr. Caring has been friends with Louise Lawler, now an internationally renowned artist and photographer, since their undergraduate years in Ithaca. Together, they created artwork under the joint pseudonym, The Roseprint Detective Club, after college. Their joint effort from 1972, “Untitled,” is considered a seminal piece in Ms. Lawler’s career and will be on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City from April 30 to July 30 as part of “Why Pictures Now,” the first New York museum survey for Ms. Lawler.

Dr. Caring, a St. George’s University graduate who is now an Attending Psychiatrist at Metropolitan Hospital and an Assistant Professor at New York Medical College, will join Ms. Lawler at the exhibit’s opening on April 25.

“I knew that Louise was going to have the show at MoMA, but I didn’t know how far back they were going to go,” Dr. Caring said. “When I found out our piece was going to be included, it was very exciting. We did a lot of this kind of work together.”

“Untitled” is a 24-page book that features a series of sayings printed on slips of paper, similar to those found in fortune cookies. Examples include “’If you don’t listen’ said the sheriff, ‘I’ll fall’” and “New shoes, blue shoes, red and pink and blue shoes, tell me what would you choose, if you were to buy.” According to MoMA, the “sly, self-effacing, oddly humorous book of misdirection and nonspecific readings … cunningly embodies how an artist’s book can be a locus for engagement between artists and readers.”

The Roseprint Detective Club’s work has been displayed at art shows in New York City, Washington DC, and Pamplona, Spain. Although Dr. Caring no longer creates art herself, she looks back fondly on her time as an art student at Cornell, where she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts before going on to obtain her master’s degree from Hunter College. She taught art in college for three years before accepting a media fellowship at a psychiatric clinic, which ended up being her segue to a career in medicine. Following the fellowship, she created video content at a psychiatric hospital and became fascinated by the research that doctors were conducting, leading her to enter into the field herself. She applied to and enrolled at SGU in the fall of 1982.

Since graduating, Dr. Caring has enjoyed a three-decade-long career in psychiatry, arriving at Metropolitan Hospital as a resident in 1987 before accepting an attending position in 1991. She was Unit Chief of the Community Support Services Psychiatric Day Treatment Program for 26 years. She has also been a Guest Editor of Psychiatric Annals and is board certified in psychiatry. For her work, she has received the Behavioral Health Best Practices Award and Behavioral Health Recognition Award from NYC Health + Hospitals.

“I couldn’t have had this career without SGU,” said Dr. Caring, who is also a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

She looks forward to welcoming friends from all over the country to New York for the exhibit. Tickets to view “Why Pictures Now” and other exhibits can be purchased on the MoMA website.

Nearly $2 Million in Scholarships Awarded to St. George’s University Students From NYC

Today, St. George’s University announced that 15 students from New York City will receive $1.8 million in scholarships to pursue degrees in medicine at the school as part of the CityDoctors Scholarship Program.

“St. George’s University has long addressed the U.S. doctor shortage by producing highly qualified physicians who are committed to their community and the practice of medicine,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President, St. George’s University. “We are proud to offer these CityDoctors scholarships because it helps pave the way for these students to practice in areas that are near and dear to them, and areas that need such physicians the most.”

CityDoctors scholarship recipients on campus at St. George’s University.

St. George’s University established the CityDoctors Scholarship Program to help address the city’s shortage of primary care physicians and to enable promising students who otherwise might not be able to afford medical school to attend. Twelve of this year’s scholarship recipients received awards sponsored by NYC Health + Hospitals and commit to serving in the New York City public health system after completing their residency. The remaining three CityDoctors honorees received awards sponsored by Brooklyn Methodist Hospital as part of a similar partnership.

Students commit to one year of service with NYC Health + Hospitals for each year of scholarship aid they receive. Since its inception, the program has awarded $11 million to 112 students from metropolitan New York.

This year, CityDoctors scholarship recipients hail from Queens, Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Manhattan, as well as Florida and Pennsylvania. They’re selected based on their academic qualifications and financial need. Recipients receive either partial or full scholarships to pay for medical school for up to four years. Some scholarships are valued at more than $200,000.

“We are very proud of our ongoing partnership with St. George’s University, as it provides students with strong ties to the New York City area with an opportunity not only to continue their education, but to have job security following graduation,” said Machelle Allen, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, NYC Health + Hospitals. “The program also helps bring more primary care physicians into the workforce and into communities across the city, where they are so desperately needed.”

The 2017 CityDoctors scholarship recipients are:

Name

Residence

Hospital Award

Lance Wobus

Florida

NYC Health + Hospitals

Edward Lee

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Daniel Dever

Pennsylvania

NYC Health + Hospitals

David Michael

Brooklyn

NYC Health + Hospitals

Maggie Yeung

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Fateha Ahmed

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Taikchan Lidar

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Sadik Uddin

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

Sneha Aidasani

Queens

NYC Health + Hospitals

GraceTackie

Bronx

NYC Health + Hospitals

Imran Baksh

Bronx

NYC Health + Hospitals

Tammy Jiang

Manhattan

NYC Health + Hospitals

Ashley Jack

Brooklyn

Brooklyn Methodist Hospital

Mena Awad

Brooklyn

Brooklyn Methodist Hospital

Paula Marie

Brooklyn

Brooklyn Methodist Hospital

St. George’s University Honors Clinical Studies Pioneer Morris Alpert

Back in its infancy, St. George’s University School of Medicine was guided forward by Dr. Morris Alpert, a hand surgeon and anatomist with a personality as unique as his expertise. The Founding Dean of Kingstown Medical College (KMC) in St. Vincent and a longtime member of the Board of Trustees for St. George’s University, Dr. Alpert built the foundation for SGU’s clinical studies program, creating a bridge between Grenada and the United States and the world that still exists today.

The University honored Dr. Alpert by unveiling a bronze plaque highlighting his accomplishments at a dedication ceremony on March 29 on the True Blue campus. Held outside Morris Alpert Hall, the ceremony was attended by University administrators, faculty, staff, and SOM alumni who knew and enjoyed the company of Dr. Alpert.

He came to SGU from Albany Medical College, where he had been Chair of Surgery. Dr. Alpert’s approach of using a modular system with leading specialists from the US, UK, and the world helped transform the School of Medicine in its early years.

“Starting off with not much—a lecture hall, a small dorm facility and two secretaries—Dr. Alpert single-handedly created the clinical program at KMC,” said Dr. C.V. Rao, Dean of Students. “He was a kind man but very strict and truly cared about all his students. And they also felt the same way, evidenced by the standing ovation he would receive when attending the SOM graduation ceremony in New York.”

“As SGU celebrates the first 40 years of its existence, what better way to do this than a formal dedication to Dr. Morris Alpert—honoring him for both his unique vision and leadership style which served our University well,” added Dr. Allen Pensick, Provost Emeritus. “For our students, there were at least 28 years of classes, twice a year, that went through St. Vincent. A great deal of our students and alumni met Dr. Alpert and got a real-life taste of medicine and how to conduct themselves in the real world.”

A member of the 1977 Charter Class, Dr. Emmett Cox II suffered a tragic bike accident early on in his studies at SGU. The first to treat Dr. Cox was Dr. Alpert, who saved his student’s life. Dr. Cox, has since become a successful orthopedic surgeon—and a hand surgeon like his mentor, Dr. Alpert.

“He was such a strong-willed person and yet so polite. He would tell us to respect our patients and learn our anatomy, and take time out to do a standard physical examination,” recalled Dr. Cox. “I feel so proud to have been trained and received my tutelage from Dr. Alpert. He taught us to never give up on your dreams no matter what. If he told you something, you could bank on it. And in my lifetime, he was a giant.”

The bronze plaque is only the most recent way in which St. George’s University has saluted Dr. Alpert’s impactful role in its growth and success. In addition to dedicating the building of Morris Alpert Hall to his memory, the Morris Alpert Scholarships exist in honor of the high moral and ethical standards he set for his students during his tenure on the faculty of St. George’s University. Dr. Alpert’s knowledge, dedication, and enthusiasm exemplified the University’s commitment to taking the practice of medicine to new and unanticipated heights.

New York City Council Honors St. George’s University’s CityDoctors Scholarship Program for Addressing Primary Care Shortage

NEW YORK (April 5) – Today, the New York City Council issued a proclamation honoring St. George’s University (SGU) for establishing the CityDoctors Scholarship Program, which covers tuition for SGU medical students who commit to working with underserved patients in the city’s public health care system.

“We are grateful for the New York City Council’s recognition of the good work that our CityDoctors scholarship recipients are doing in New York’s neediest neighborhoods,” said Charles Modica, Chancellor of St. George’s University. “And we at St. George’s look forward to educating the next generation of CityDoctors scholars, who are making an honorable commitment to serve the people of New York.”

St. George’s University established the CityDoctors Scholarship Program in partnership with NYC Health + Hospitals to support students from New York City who might otherwise be unable to afford medical school. Students commit to one year of service with NYC Health + Hospitals for each year of scholarship aid they receive.

This year, the program will award $1.5 million in scholarships to 12 recipients from New York City and its surrounding area, who will commit to practicing primary care medicine in the city’s public health care system after graduation. Since its start in 2012, the CityDoctors program has awarded full- and partial-tuition scholarships to 112 students, totaling more than $12 million in medical school scholarships.

“The collaboration with St. George’s University has enabled more than 80 students the opportunity not only to continue their education, but to have job security following graduation,” said Machelle Allen, MD, Chief Medical Officer, NYC Health + Hospitals. “The program also helps bring more primary care physicians into the workforce and into communities across the city, where they are so desperately needed. Thank you to the New York City Council for acknowledging this important program.”

“St. George’s is committed to educating the top-notch medical graduates that the United States needs to close its doctor shortage,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, president of St. George’s University. “The CityDoctors Scholarship Program stands out as a great example of how medical schools can work with hospitals to do just that.”

 

St. George’s University CME Examines Advances In Medicine Over Last 40 Years

Since opening its doors 40 years ago, St. George’s University has evolved from a mere idea into an international center for education. Health care, too, has witnessed significant advances that have changed the landscape of medicine. These innovations were examined and celebrated in concert with SGU’s milestone anniversary at March’s School of Medicine Alumni Association (SOMAA) continuing medical education conference in Grenada.

Titled “Advances in Medicine in the Last 40 Years,” the four-day conference was sponsored in part by Hackensack University Medical Center (HUMC) in New Jersey. It featured prominent SOM alumni and faculty presenters who presented on such topics as sepsis treatment, opioid abuse and solutions for health care providers, and the impact of infectious disease on society today.

In addition, SGU President Dr. G. Richard Olds delivered a presentation on “Building a Medical School Around Social Needs.”

“CME conferences are designed to educate physicians on what’s happening in practice, and in medicine. My presentation focused on what’s the latest we know in the education of physicians and how to design a medical to school to get a higher percentage in the future to better address the US health needs,” explained Dr. Olds. “This CME in particular was aimed at a broad group of physicians trying to give them updates in areas that are relevant to their practice but they may not individually be as up to date on.”

“As the academic sponsor, Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center is pleased to bring continuing medical education back to the island of Grenada,” said Dr. Joseph Feldman, MD SGU ’89, Chairman of Emergency Medicine, HUMC. “We look forward to partnering with SGU on this important initiative for many years to come and to expand the event, increasing the number of participants worldwide, to make it a truly international endeavor.”

More than 50 attended the CME, 44 of whom were SGU alumni, as well as 18 Grenadian physicians who practice locally. In addition to the seminars, the SOMAA provided plenty of opportunities to experience a taste of culture and hospitality on the island many of the attendees called home during their studies. The group enjoyed a sightseeing tour of Grenada’s natural beauty; lunch at Belmont Estate, a fully functional and historic plantation; a shopping tour of Grenada’s capital, St. George’s; a sunset barbecue; river tubing; and a Catamaran day cruise including snorkeling and a visit to the Underwater Sculpture Park and Hog Island; and lastly an alumni charity dinner with proceeds aiding the purchase of cardiology equipment for the SGU Physicians Network Program.

“Physicians are always looking for continuing medical education but this was also a chance for our graduates to come back to Grenada and celebrate 40 years of alumni achievements with their friends and colleagues,” said Dr. Bruce Bonanno, SOMAA President. “We are extremely pleased with the success of this event and can’t wait for the next CME in March 2018.”

Social Media Impact and Mixed Reality Explored at St. George’s University’s First-Ever Tech Day

The Educational Computing Team (ECT) at St. George’s University launched the Spring 2017 Series of its Teaching with Technology Tuesdays (TwTT) with its first-ever Tech Day on March 10, 2017 at Allen Pensick Hall. With the theme “Innovative Use of Technology in Teaching and Learning,” Tech Day centered on social media and video in education, 3D technologies, and the use of augmented/mixed reality in medical education.

“Tech Day provides an opportunity for participants to actually see, touch and play in what we call our sandbox,” explained Shereene Twum-Barimah, Educational Technology Specialist. “At our past TwTT launches and workshops, our audience expressed an interest in interacting directly with the various technologies our presenters were showcasing. With our introduction of Tech Day, everyone now has a chance to physically connect with a variety of different technologies on display before them, including 3D printing and several virtual and augmented reality devices.”

With the prevalence of mobile devices, students are learning anywhere and everywhere. According to Ms. Twum-Barimah, teachers all over the world can easily record their lectures and lessons and make them available for students to consume on multiple platforms and non-traditional classroom environments. As a result, students can come prepared to have more meaningful discussions in the classroom with their instructors and peers. Technology has been modifying and redefining the face of education for years now and is getting even more innovative. The classroom is no longer defined by the walls the students are sitting within. Today’s students will now need the knowledge and skills to navigate these new learning environments.

In his presentation, “Using Augmented/Mixed Reality for Medical Education,” guest speaker Ted Dinsmore, Business Technologist and Co-Founder of SphereGen in Connecticut, focused on the evolving work in applying technology to learning in the medical education arena. He covered the basics of understanding what is virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality, and how it is used throughout life currently and what the future of this technology looks like. Additionally, Mr. Dinsmore discussed how medical schools are using this technology and how it is being used in hospitals by doctors from surgery to collaboration boards. Lastly, attendees were given a demonstration of how the anatomy of a heart can be taught using a mixed reality device with the assistance of Dr. Mark Clunes, Assistant Dean of Basic Sciences.

“My presentation is all about getting people to try out the new technology. If you’ve played Pokémon Go, you’ve used augmented reality,” stated Mr. Dinsmore. “We live in a physical world, but today’s kids and students live in a virtual world in that game where they’re enjoying that experience of being in their environment. So when we overlay the virtual world over the physical world, that is what we call augmented reality.

“Mixed reality is the blending of physical reality with a virtual program, a see-through effect which can be achieved through the use of many different devices on the market today,” added Mr. Dinsmore. “Movies such as ‘Minority Report’ were designed off of this technology. And now the profits from these movies are funding a lot of this technology today. One such device, the HoloLens, provides an untethered full physical PC on your head with all the technology you need in one unit.”

In addition to his more than 20 years in the field, Mr. Dinsmore’s company has developed mobile and web-based applications for SGU. He is also the co-author of the book “Partnering with Microsoft.” Other Tech Day presentations featured were “Video in Education” by rich media team members Dari Twum-Barimah and Kellidon Niles, and “3D Technologies” by Jessica Holland and Wes Price; Alyssa Bierzynski, an Instructor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, also gave a lively presentation on Social Media in Education, illustrating how easy it is to enhance the learning experience by incorporating elements of social media into the classroom.

“For more and more of our students, virtual reality is becoming the only reality they know,” said Ms. Bierzynski. “Many of today’s students have no idea what it was like to go to an encyclopedia for information. For today’s students, their source of information is Google.”

St. George’s University Educational Computing Team is committed to providing quality training and support to the faculty, staff and students at the University. Tasked with improving methods of teaching and learning at SGU, it promotes greater utilization of cutting-edge technology, so that the highest quality of education can be provided to the students that attend this institution.

St. George’s University and WINDREF Launch Caribbean Center for Health Equity

St. George’s University and the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF) have partnered with a number of other local and international collaborators on a focused initiative for the Caribbean to increase awareness and efforts towards promoting health equity with the recent launch of the Caribbean Center for Health Equity (CCHE).

Determined to realize a vision of a Caribbean free from health inequities, the principal goal of the CCHE is to promote equity among the Caribbean society by reducing the impact of social determinants of health. For many in the region these include being denied access to health care because of deep discrimination, patient blaming, neglect, verbal or physical abuse, and disregard for traditional beliefs. By establishing a regional network of partners focused on promoting health equity, the CCHE will identify priority areas of health inequity across territories in the Caribbean and monitor and evaluate all community-based research programs towards informing sustainable efforts for promoting health equity.

According to the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO), persistent inequities across gender, race, and socioeconomic groups in the Caribbean compound every major health challenge facing the region. As inequality continues to be a major barrier to good health, the CCHE will serve as a Center of Excellence in education, research, and service towards addressing the social determinants of health and providing accessible and equitable health care for the Caribbean region.

“Through the education of physicians, veterinarians, and public health, business management, social science, and environmental professionals, SGU contributes towards the capacity building and human resource development to meet the need of addressing health inequities in both developed and developing countries,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of SGU. “Over the past 40 years, SGU has provided over $90 million USD in Caribbean scholarships, and trained over 400 physicians and 70 public health professionals. And many of these students have gone on to live and practice medicine in the region.”

“WINDREF and SGU have been involved over the last 20 years in many applied research projects related to health disparities. The creation of a Caribbean Center for Health Equity, as a program within WINDREF will continue to strengthen and focus these research activities,” added Dr. Calum Macpherson, Director of WINDREF. “The CCHE will serve to coordinate all efforts on the part of WINDREF in addressing challenges towards health equity. It will include a regional network of partner governmental, academic and community-based institutions, related researchers and practitioners, as well as support students in education, research and service work on health equity.”

Founded in 1994, WINDREF is an independent non-profit organization, which promotes health, well being, and sustainable development through multi-disciplinary research, education, and community programs across the Caribbean region. Additionally, WINDREF promotes collaborative relationships between leading internationally recognized scholars and regional scientists, and adheres to the highest ethical and academic standards in the design and conduct of research.

The CCHE will utilize the administrative capability and physical space provided by WINDREF. Additional centers and programs, which currently exist within WINDREF, include the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Regional Collaborating Center (UNFCCC, RCC), Sport for Health, Caribbean Ecohealth, Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, Bioethics, and Brain Initiative, among others.

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School Dean Delivers Annual Bourne Lecture at St. George’s University

Dr. Robert Johnson MD, Dean of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, delivers the 23rd annual Geoffrey H. Bourne Memorial Lecture.

The success of an institution and its personnel can hinge on the professional culture it creates, this according to Dr. Robert L. Johnson, The Sharon and Joseph L. Muscarelle Endowed Dean at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS) and keynote speaker at the 23rd Annual Geoffrey Bourne Memorial Lecture.

Dr. Johnson, who also serves as Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine at NJMS, gave the presentation titled “Professionalism in Health Care” at Charter Hall before dozens of hospital administrators who were attending SGU’s annual clinical meetings.

“I think that in these days, it is one of the most important things that we can do,” Dr. Johnson said. “We need to be in charge of that. Many of the things that we used to be in charge of, we aren’t in charge of anymore. Only the profession can adequately define professionalism, set the standards, and make sure that we all adhere to them.”

The Latin phrase “primum non nocere” – or “first, do no harm” – is still the bedrock of the profession, but increased attention is devoted to creating and maintaining a professional workplace, and teaching the principles outlined in “Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter,” a groundbreaking research study conducted by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation, the American College of Physicians (ACP)-American Society of Internal Medicine (ASIM) Foundation, and the European Federation of Internal Medicine in 2002. The Charter consisted of three fundamental principles – primacy of patient welfare, patient autonomy, and social justice – as well as 10 commitments ranging from honesty and confidentiality to professional competence and improving access to care.

Such commitments to the profession start at the top and are passed down to students not only through communication but observation, what Dr. Johnson called “the hidden curriculum.”

“What students really learn from their professors is not only based on what they say but what they do,” Dr. Johnson said. “They learn to be doctors as a result of mimicking what you do – how you talk to your patients, how you handle problems, how you handle mistakes, and how you talk to each other.”

He also stressed the importance of setting expectations for students through ceremonial events, written documents, and training, with assessments and remediation done based on their performance.

“People come to us with a variety of experiences and backgrounds that determine how they will acquire and administer new material,” Dr. Johnson said. “You must have a process for identifying problems and remediating them.”

In addition to his roles at NJMS, Dr. Johnson chairs the New Jersey Governor’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS and Related Blood-Borne Pathogens, as well as the Newark Ryan White Planning Council. He has previously served as the President of the New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners, the Chair of the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Council on Graduate Medical Education. Dr. Johnson joins a decorated list of Bourne speakers that includes Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and neurology pioneer Lord Walton of Detchant. The lecture series is named for St. George’s University’s first Vice Chancellor, Dr. Geoffrey H. Bourne, an educator, scientist, writer, and visionary who helped guide the University in its early development.

St. George’s University Approved by Georgia Composite Medical Board

The Georgia Composite Medical Board (GCMB) has approved St. George’s University, allowing its third- and fourth-year medical students to conduct their clinical training in the Peach State. In addition to the GCMB endorsement, SGU has created a partnership with DeKalb Medical Network, an agreement that facilitates clinical education opportunities at the organization’s three Atlanta-area hospitals.

“We are excited to continue expanding our network of affiliated hospitals in order to offer our students an array of clinical experiences,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President and CEO of St. George’s University. “This approval and this new partnership represent key cogs in our growing educational network.”

The Georgia Composite Medical Board licenses physicians and other medical professionals within the state. GCMB representatives visited the True Blue campus for four days in August, evaluating the University’s mission, programs, facilities and more. With its approval, Georgia becomes one of 12 US states in which SGU clinical students can obtain training, joining Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New York, and New Jersey, as well as Washington, DC. Outside the US, clinical rotations are available in Canada, the United Kingdom, and Grenada.

“SGU students can benefit greatly from rotating in a wide variety of locations and fields,” said Dr. Daniel Ricciardi, MD SGU ’81, Dean of Clinical Studies at St. George’s University. “By learning from leading physicians across several different state-of-the-art facilities, they can gain experience and perspective that, upon graduating, will only enhance the quality of care they provide in their own practice.”

In addition to its approval from the GCMB, SGU has created a partnership with DeKalb Medical Network, which opens up clinical education opportunities to the University’s third- and fourth-year students. DeKalb’s hospitals have more than 600 acute care beds and provide specialty care through an emergency department as well as cancer, orthopedic, and wellness centers.

“Our partnership with DeKalb Medical Network will provide hundreds of our students the opportunity to learn and practice medicine at a very high level,” said Dr. Stephen Weitzman, Dean of St. George’s University School of Medicine. “These hospitals are ideal environments for young doctors to take on their first responsibilities in the field.”

Through these clerkships, students can obtain hands-on exposure to all medical roles in a hospital. Each clinical center can accommodate as many as 100 students, who can enroll in sub-internships, up to five rotations, and elective courses.