St. George’s University Offers New Grants for January Med School Enrollees

 

Today, St. George’s University awarded scholarships to four applicants to the University’s medical school as part of its #SGUperspective program. The winners will each receive up to $10,000.

“We are delighted to honor Matthew DeLuca, Joseph Varvarigos, Adam Kirstein, and Laraib Sehrish with scholarships through the #SGUperspective program,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “These grants are helping us attract a January class with a passion for medicine and a wide range of viewpoints and experiences.”

#SGUperspective scholarships are available to new students who enroll in the January 2018 class. Students can apply by creating a 30-60 second video highlighting the aspects of medicine that inspire them, sharing it on social media with the hashtag #SGUperspective, and submitting it here for evaluation by the University’s admissions committee. St. George’s will award scholarships of up to $10,000 to as many as 30 students.

Mr. DeLuca chose to focus on leadership and service, while Mr. Varvarigos made his video about the importance of having an open heart. Mr. Kirstein sang about the need for doctors to connect with patients, and Ms. Sehrish homed in on the need for empathy in medicine.

This late-entry grant program will be accepting application for the January 2018 class until December 31.

Applicants to St. George’s January class will also be eligible for the newly established Humanitarian Scholarship, which is awarded to students who demonstrate a commitment to philanthropy and community service. Like the #SGUperspective grants, this scholarship is available only to students entering in January.

Students applying for admission in January will also be considered for CityDoctors Scholarships, which support students planning to work in urban hospitals in the New York metropolitan area.

“We look forward to welcoming a class of students this January who are committed to academic excellence,” Dr. Olds said. “Our video grant program has already led us to four future superstars who will bring innovative, unique perspectives to medicine—and we look forward to identifying many more.”

Remembering Professor Sir Kenneth Stuart, A Distinguished Doctor, Lecturer, Academic, and Advisor

St. George’s University today pays tribute to Professor Sir Kenneth Stuart, who died on November 11, 2017. A distinguished doctor, lecturer, academic, and advisor, Sir Kenneth was a founding member of the Board of Directors and Scientific Advisory Board of the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF), and was a Friend of St George’s University, where he sat on the Academic Board for more than 20 years. His illustrious career included crucial research on issues ranging from human rights and ethics to child safety and science education. Sir Kenneth left an indelible mark on SGU and all of his students and colleagues, and his contributions to medicine and research will continue to benefit many generations to come.

Born on June 16, 1920 in Barbados, he attended Harrison’s College before going on to obtain his MD from Queen’s University in Belfast, Ireland. In 1952, he joined the staff of the newly established University Hospital of the West Indies in Jamaica as its first senior registrar in medicine.  He was later promoted to Consultant, Lecturer, and became the first West Indian Professor (1966) and subsequently Dean of the Faculty of Medicine (1969) a post he held until his retirement from the University of the West Indies in 1976. He then served, for eight years, as Medical Advisor to the Commonwealth Secretariat in London.

In July 1977, Sir Kenneth received the distinction of Knight Bachelor from Her Majesty the Queen “for services to medicine in the Commonwealth in general and the Caribbean in particular.” His contribution was significant: During his work in Jamaica, he described two previously unknown medical disorders ‘acute toxic hypoglycaemia’, and ‘veno-occlusive disease of the liver.’ With his colleagues, these conditions were identified and nearly eliminated from the country in less than two decades.

Many international organizations were fortunate to benefit from Sir Kenneth’s expertise, who served in positions as diverse as Director of the International Medical Education Trust; Honorary Medical and Scientific Adviser to the Barbados High Commission in London; Founder Trustee and Patron of Students Partnership Worldwide, and board member of the Errol and Nita Barrow Education Trust.

In his capacity as a member of SGU’s Academic Board, Sir Kenneth played an important role in guiding the development  and evolution of the University, which has become a innovative and international center of academic excellence and a leader in global medicine. In recognition of his numerous scientific contributions to medicine, he was awarded an honorary DSc (1986) from Queen’s University, and for his contributions to St. George’s University, was awarded the Order of the Mace in 2008.

He leaves his wife, Barbara, and three children.

St. George’s University Launches Online Master of Public Health Program

In a first for St. George’s University, students will now be able to obtain a Master of Public Health online—widening the opportunity for students around the world to benefit from SGU’s teaching program. Launched to coincide with the University’s 40th anniversary, the move encapsulates SGU’s commitment to teach in innovative ways in the years ahead, while improving access to medical education.

SGU’s MPH graduate degree produces leading public health practitioners and researchers for the Caribbean and for the rest of the world. Those who opt to study the course online pursue a degree specialization in the Global Health Track, which is designed to help students gain insight into issues that impact public health on a global scale. Students will learn how to plan, design, and implement programs to benefit the overall health of communities across the globe.

Commenting on the launch, Dr. Calum Macpherson, Vice Provost for International Program Development and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, said: “SGU is a leading international university, and it is fitting that, in our 40th anniversary year, we are providing the opportunity for those interested in furthering their knowledge in global public health, to take our MPH program online. By taking our Master of Public Health course online, more students from around the world—many of whom live in areas with chronic shortages of public health professionals—will be able to obtain a qualification from St. George’s University’s School of Graduate Studies.”

The course will provide students with the background to address issues that impact global healthcare such as occupational health, preventative healthcare, as well as environmental health concerns including waste and water management, and air pollution control.

SGU’s MPH degree program is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), the US accrediting body for public health programs.

Off-Duty MD Grad Treats Casualties During Las Vegas Shooting Tragedy

Adiofel Mark Mendoza, MD SGU ’14 (right), with family in Las Vegas

First he witnessed two ambulances screaming down Las Vegas Boulevard, and over the next five minutes or so, three or four more zoomed past. Adiofel Mark Mendoza, MD SGU ’14, thought it unusual for a Sunday night—even in Las Vegas, where he was wrapping up a five-day vacation with family.

Dr. Mendoza checked the local dispatcher feed and pieced together information on an active shooter situation just four blocks south—at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival outside the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

That’s when he, like many off-duty service workers, sprung into action. Dr. Mendoza raced to the scene and helped set up a triage center for injured concert goers about 1,000 feet from the site of the tragedy. Over the next six to eight hours, he treated approximately 20 patients who had been injured during the massacre, which left 59 people dead and more than 500 injured.

Dr. Mendoza—who is a full-time hospitalist at Summit Medical Group in New Jersey—confessed that he feels fortunate to have been able to help, but upset that such an event required it.

“I was honored to be there,” he said. “I’m glad there was something that I could do, and that I had the training, unfortunately, that was needed.

“It was a group effort. It was amazing how people were just running up to us asking what they could do, how they could help – nurses who were off duty, EMTs, off-duty or retired law enforcement, ex-military. A lot of people saved a lot of lives and did more courageous things than I did.”

Upon learning of the active situation outside the Mandalay Bay, Dr. Mendoza took a cab as close to the site as he could get before approaching it on foot. En route, he encountered a young woman bleeding from her pelvis, and her boyfriend who had been shot in the shoulder. After providing immediate treatment, Dr. Mendoza flagged down two ambulances and directed the drivers to rush the couple to the nearest trauma center immediately.

He then boarded an ambulance and, amid the chaos, made his way to the main command center—a circle of approximately 30 ambulances and fire trucks on Las Vegas Boulevard that allowed medical personnel to safely treat casualties. Injured concert goers slowly began to trickle in, many on makeshift wheelchairs—office chairs that had been borrowed from nearby businesses. They were treated for both physical and mental trauma.

“Truthfully, it was like being in the emergency room, just on a mass scale,” he said. “It was like being on the job. I’ve gone through a range of emotions and when people asked me about what happened, I really didn’t know what to say. I’m just thankful that I was there and that could help out in some way.”

Dr. Mendoza had been exposed to high-level trauma cases during his clinical training in New York City, Newark, and Chicago. He joined Summit Health after completing his internal medicine residency at New York University Langone Medical Center in Brooklyn, NY this summer, and has his sights set on becoming a military doctor. He is currently in the middle of the review process to be commissioned in the United States Navy Reserves.

“During my training, I volunteered myself every time there was a trauma code because those are the cases I want to be involved in,” Dr. Mendoza said. I forced myself to be in those situations so I could desensitize myself and be in the right state of mind when I’m needed.”

“It’s very upsetting to see something like this,” he continued. “I don’t know how people could do this to each other. In the ER, you see accidents where people come in with broken bones and such, but this was intentional, and these were innocent people who just there on vacation. They in no way deserved this.”

Billionaire’s Yacht Escorts SGU Vet to 10-Day BVI Relief Mission

Dr. Kenrith Carter had to make a quick decision.

Three days after Hurricane Irma devastated the British Virgin Islands, a friend told him of an opportunity to volunteer his veterinary services to those impacted by the storm. And that the mode of transport—a yacht owned by business magnate Sir Richard Branson—was leaving in three hours.

Despite the short notice, the St. George’s University graduate jumped at the opportunity to provide much-needed aid to those affected, suspending his mobile veterinary practice in Grenada for two weeks.

“Although I left my practice and my own animals behind, I felt very much at home helping those in need and I knew I was meant to be there,” said Dr. Carter, DVM SGU ’15, BSc SGU ’11.

The yacht transported Dr. Carter and crew members to Barbados where they met up with Sir Richard’s son, Sam, and two friends. They then flew by plane to Puerto Rico and, with Sir Richard, by helicopter to the British Virgin Islands. Over the 10-day span, Dr. Carter performed countless procedures—everything from emergency surgeries on lemurs to rehabilitating flamingos and husbandry on tortoises and exotic birds. He also provided travel documents so that some pets could fly out with their owners to the United States, Puerto Rico, and United Kingdom.

Dr. Carter headed a four-man animal team on Necker Island, and performed work either solo or with an assistant at the other locations.

“It was really heartwarming to see that people who could’ve been somewhere else and doing something else left their lives at home behind to come to the rescue of other people,” said Dr. Carter. “It was quite an experience. There were people who lost their homes, people who lost everything, and yet were still worried about how

they were going to feed their beloved animals.”

They were worried despite widespread damage to the region caused by Irma. During the mission, Dr. Carter stayed with Sir Richard, who in addition to founding the Virgin Group is a well-known philanthropist, as well as family members and friends at the Branson home on Necker Island, which “took serious damage.”

“There was severe devastation everywhere,” Dr. Carter said. “No house made it through unscratched, and many were completely destroyed. Every tree was affected—most lost all of their leaves and had broken branches. The place was just brown and had debris everywhere until nine or 10 days after when the first rain fell.”

Hurricane Maria arrived shortly thereafter, forcing the group to evacuate—“I would have stayed at least another week at least otherwise.” Dr. Carter returned home to resume his role as practicing veterinarian and owner of Dr. Carter Vet Services, a private mobile practice that offers affordable veterinary care and first-response pet care throughout Grenada and Carriacou. He cherishes the experience he had in the BVI, but quickly was back on schedule upon arriving back in Grenada.

“I was coming from a disaster zone and all, but I had a few emergencies in the days when I got back,” Dr. Carter said. “I got back in the flow real fast.”

St. George’s University’s Primary Medical Qualification Receives GMC Approval

All graduate doctors from St. George’s University are from this month automatically eligible to apply for General Medical Council (GMC) registration, following the regulatory body’s decision to remove the medical school from their case-by-case list.

The move recognizes the quality of SGU’s graduates and teaching standards, and paves the way for SGU graduates to study and work in the UK following successful registration and completion of prerequisite exams.

Following a review of the university’s primary medical qualifications, the Council agreed that graduates from St. George’s University are now able to apply to sit the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB) test and GMC registration in the UK, without having their qualification individually assessed. Applicants had previously been approved on a case-by-case basis.

The PLAB test is the main route by which international medical graduates demonstrate that they have the necessary skills and knowledge to practice medicine in the UK.

Rodney Croft, Dean of Clinical Studies UK, explained the significance of the move. “That the GMC will now recognize the SGU MD degree without an individual examination of each qualification is a major step forward and will encourage more SGU graduates to come to practice in the UK. This is one of a number of recent positive changes to come from the GMC, including the revocation of the ‘50% rule.’ ”

For many years, SGU’s medical graduates were assessed on a case-by-case basis with the Case Registration Advisor at the GMC having a wide latitude for determining the parameters of the “50% rule.” Some were in jeopardy of being registered with the GMC if they joined an international selective, thereby having two more weeks on their  transcript “away from the country awarding the diploma” and therefore putting them on the wrong side of the “50% rule.”

The students in SGU’s Keith B. Taylor Global Scholars Program were particularly adversely affected by this rule since they spend the first year of their basic science program in the UK. As SGU’s clinical program takes place mainly in the US and the UK, students at the KBTGSP would not be able to be registered with the GMC, unless they returned to Grenada to do their final-year elective program. Now such students can benefit from doing their fourth-year attachments in the US and/or the UK.

“Another problem for our students has been the timing of the PLAB exams, which have meant our graduates have had to wait up to 18 months following graduation without a salary before beginning their first foundation year in UK hospitals,” Mr. Croft added. “In the near future, PLAB is being replaced with the Medical Licensing Assessment, which will be held more frequently throughout the year.

“It is hoped that, when taken together, these measures will help address the serious shortage of doctors in the UK, particularly in general practice, psychiatry, and emergency medicine.”

Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University, said, “Our students receive a world-class medical education and are able to take advantage of facilities in the UK, Grenada, Canada, and the USA as part of their formal training. As a result, our graduates benefit from a truly globalized training program, making them ideal candidates to work in healthcare systems with a diversity of patients, like the NHS.

“I am pleased that this has been recognized by the General Medical Council in the UK, and look forward to more doctors from SGU taking advantage of the rewarding career opportunities offered in the UK.”

DVM Grad Tackles Rabies at the Source in Malawi

At 10 minutes to eight in the morning, John Clark, DVM SGU ’12, and his crew pulled up to the village of Embangweni, located about 250 kilometers north of Malawi’s capital city, Lilongwe, where Dr. Clark grew up. In the weeks prior, the local radio station had advertised why Dr. Clark’s charitable organization, the Community Health Coalition, had come—to administer free rabies vaccines for area animals.

Dr. Clark discovered a line of people and animals several hundred deep. They encountered the same response days later at their second clinic in Mufwe, Zambia—citizen after citizen awaiting important health care for their pets.

“Everybody was there waiting even before we arrived,” he said of the crowds. “I couldn’t believe it.”

Across the two communities, Dr. Clark, his wife Rachel, and veterinary assistants administered more than 542 rabies vaccines to area animals, helping to address a dire public health problem that spreads across the country and the continent.

Dr. Clark, who operates the Community Veterinary Clinic in Vero Beach, Florida, hopes that it is his first step of many in helping to eradicate rabies in Malawi. His desire is in line with how he arrived at St. George’s University—courtesy of a Commonwealth Jubilee Scholarship, which are awarded to Commonwealth citizens who are committed to developing health care in their home country.

“It feels good to have spent the two days in Malawi and Zambia because it was an opportunity for us to give back to the community,” said Dr. Clark.

The 2012 SGU graduate modeled the mission after a vaccination program created by Dr. Guy Palmer, Founding Director of the Paul G. Allen School of Global Animal Health at Washington State University. The program aimed to create a rabies-free zone in Kenya and Tanzania that would encourage other regions to focus their attention on the disease as well.

Dr. Clark consulted with Dr. Palmer—who was also a keynote speaker at St. George’s University’s One Health One Medicine Symposium in October—and began to put together his own plan to vaccinate dogs in remote locations in Malawi and Zambia. While the vaccination mission was a step in the right direction, he even admitted it’s a small one. According to the WHO, it is necessary to vaccinate 70 percent of the dog population in an area to control rabies, which would require approximately 80,000 vaccines in northern Malawi alone per Dr. Clark.

However, plans are moving forward on a global scale. At a conference earlier this year in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Global Alliance for Rabies Control (GARC) established End Rabies Now, a framework strategy to eliminate the disease worldwide by 2030. The alliance hopes to attack the issue by providing affordable human vaccines and antibodies, prompt treatment of infected individuals, and widespread dog vaccinations.

Much of the focus is on Africa and Asia, where rabies causes tens of thousands of deaths each year. Since his mission, Dr. Clark has gained 501(c)(3) status for his organization and began laying the groundwork for SGU students to complete clinical rotations in Malawi. He plans to return there to provide many more rabies vaccinations in 2018.

“People are coming from the outside and trying to make a difference,” Dr. Clark said. “We made a dent. We will try again next year and just keep trying and trying. We hope to get bigger each year.”

St. George’s University Introduces Pay It Forward Program for Canadian Students

This week, St. George’s University launched the Pay It Forward program, which will allow Canadian students who enroll in SGU’s January MD entering classes, starting in January of 2018, to claim a refund of their tuition if they are accepted to and matriculate at a Canadian or US allopathic medical school for the subsequent fall term.

“Applying to medical school is stressful. Many students may not want to wait until the spring for an offer of admission from a Canadian medical school that may never come,” said Sandra Banner, SGU’s consultant for university relations in Canada. “Pay It Forward will allow Canadian students to jumpstart their medical educations without sacrificing the possibility of returning to Canada for medical school.”

“We’re confident that after one semester at St. George’s, they’ll decide to stay,” Banner added. “However, the beauty of this program is that if they want to go to the Canadian—or US—medical school, they have a term of top-quality integrated systems-based medical education under their belt. They will shine in their new medical school!”

Starting this January application cycle, anyone who enrolls for the Spring 2018 semester at SGU and is subsequently admitted to—and enrolled at—a Canadian or US allopathic medical school for the Fall 2018 term will receive a full refund of SGU’s tuition and fees, if they choose to accept their spot in Canada or the US.

This program is the latest in a series of efforts by St. George’s to bolster its offerings to Canadian students. This year, St. George’s hired Banner, the former CEO of the Canadian Resident Matching Service, and Charles Furey, a former elected official with years of experience in the Canadian government, to help strengthen the University’s network in Canada.

Banner and Furey will work to increase the number of clinical rotation spots available to St. George’s students and establish electives at new hospitals all over the country.

“Our Pay It Forward program demonstrates that we have the utmost confidence in the education and experience we provide at St. George’s,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “We have a long and storied tradition of educating Canada’s doctors of the future, and we believe that this program will help us attract even more of Canada’s best and brightest.”

St. George’s University Launches $10 Million Humanitarian Scholarship Fund

St. George’s University has announced the creation of a $10 million scholarship fund for students interested in humanitarian work. Students may receive individual partial-tuition awards averaging $30,000.

“Social outreach and humanitarian work are central to our mission here at St. George’s,” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “From Grenada to the thousands of hospitals and clinics worldwide where our graduates work, we’ve always sought to provide top-notch care to those in need. This scholarship fund will enable more students to pursue their passions for helping the underprivileged.”

All students applying for admission for the January sessions will be automatically considered for the Humanitarian Scholarship. Eligible applicants will be evaluated based on their backgrounds in humanitarian work, such as dedicated work in Vistra, the Peace Corps, Habitat for Humanity, medical missions, volunteer in community organizations—all activities that show a dedication to improving the general welfare of mankind and its communities.

The Humanitarian Scholarship is one of many awards currently available to St. George’s students. The Legacy of Excellence Scholarship Program, for example, offers partial-tuition scholarships to students with strong academic records. CityDoctors scholarships are awarded to students who intend to practice in urban communities after graduation.

“We work hard to make medical school a feasible option for each and every one of our applicants,” Dr. Olds added. “The more scholarships we can offer, the more diverse and well-rounded our student body will be.”

St. George’s University Awards Scholarships to 122 Incoming Students

Legacy of Excellence and Chancellor’s Circle Legacy of Excellence scholarship recipients gather for a group photo on the upper True Blue Campus.

St. George’s University has awarded more than $800,000 in scholarships to 122 members of the School of Medicine’s incoming class of 2021.

“Here at St. George’s, we aim to help talented students from around the world achieve their goal of becoming doctors, irrespective of their social or economic backgrounds” said Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George’s University. “Our scholarship recipients are enormously accomplished and we are excited to welcome them to school this fall.”

Seventy-nine incoming students received Legacy of Excellence Scholarships in recognition of their strong MCAT scores and records of academic excellence. St. George’s has offered these $60,000 scholarships for more than a decade.

Forty-three students received the Chancellor’s Circle of Legacy of Excellence scholarship, an $80,100 award for those with undergraduate GPAs of 3.7 or higher, science GPAs of 3.5 or higher, and MCAT scores of 506 or higher. St. George’s has offered these scholarships for the past eight years.

“We believe financial need shouldn’t stop aspiring physicians from serving their communities,” said Dr. Olds. “We hope that these scholarship recipients will graduate from St. George’s determined to bring their newfound medical expertise to areas most in need.”

This year’s recipients join more than 5,000 students who have received academic scholarships from the University. In total, SGU has granted more than $100 million in scholarships.